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Puyallup Tribe aims to open pot shop on tribal land in Fife
PUYALLUP, Wash. (AP) - The Puyallup Tribe of Indians is planning to sell recreational marijuana on tribal land in Fife. Tribal spokesman John Weymer says the tribe is eyeing a marijuana shop where it now runs Stogie's Cigar & Sports Lounge in Fife, about 30 miles south of Seattle. The ...
-1 points by The Washington Times | Tacoma Washington Cannabis Pierce County Washington Recreational drug use Hemp Washington Puyallup The News Tribune
YouTube video shot inside medical pot grow raises questions
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) - One of New Mexico's licensed marijuana producers is under fire after a YouTube music video featured the facility's marijuana as a backdrop. The Albuquerque Journal reports (http://bit.ly/2bZatL3 ) that a Sept. 1 letter from the state's Medical Cannabis Program asks New Mexico Top Organics - Ultra ...
1 points by The Washington Times | Albuquerque New Mexico New Mexico United States Cannabis
Addictive painkiller profiteer donates $500k to fight cannabis legalization in Arizona
Insys Therapeutics, which profits off of a painkiller 50 times more potent than heroin, has donated $500,000 to a campaign opposing marijuana legalization in the US state of Arizona. Read Full Article at RT.com
7274 points by Russia Today | Opioid Cannabis Legality of cannabis by country Psychoactive drug Cannabis Pharmacology Drug addiction Prohibition
Stanford engineers develop roadside marijuana test
It’s similar to a breathalyzer for alcohol, but uses saliva to test for marijuana intake.         
284 points by Arizona Republic | Drug addiction Cannabis Cannabis Measurement Tetrahydrocannabinol Psychoactive drug Hashish Smoke
Philly420: Medical marijuana could be thriving business in Philly

-1 points by The Philadelphia Inquirer | Cannabis Medical cannabis Tetrahydrocannabinol Dispensary Cannabis sativa Legality of cannabis by country Chemotherapy Pennsylvania
Donald Trump, ahead in new Ohio poll, swings through Cleveland: Ohio Politics Roundup
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump visits a Cleveland charter school to talk education. The billionaire leads Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton in Ohio by 4 points, according to a new Quinnipiac University poll. Read more in today's Ohio Politics Roundup. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump visits a Cleveland charter school to talk education. The billionaire leads Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton in Ohio by 4 points, according to a new Quinnipiac University poll. Read more in today's Ohio Politics Roundup. Trump's Throwback Thursday: During a visit to a charter school on Cleveland's East Side, Trump looked to the past while continuing to make his case for an urban agenda, cleveland.com's Andrew J. Tobias reported. "If we can put a man on the moon, dig out the Panama Canal and win two World Wars, I have no doubt that we can provide school choice to every disadvantaged child in the country," Trump said during his 40-minute speech, which focused on education issues. The scene at Trump's visit: Trump fans and detractors peacefully faced off before the billionaire's appearance at the Cleveland Arts & Social Sciences Academy charter school, cleveland.com reporter Henry Gomez writes. "Fans of the Republican nominee for president outnumbered the foes. Their encounter was mostly peaceful, but hardly polite," writes Gomez, who posted a video of the encounter. "Most of those outside demonstrating against Trump were abortion-rights advocates who are upset with the New York businessman's shifty, but ultimately anti-abortion stance." Background on Trump's charter school visit: The owner of the charter school Trump visited, Ron Packard, is a "major figure in the national charter school community for years," Plain Dealer reporter Patrick O'Donnell writes. "He's also made several moves in the last two years to be a significant charter school force in Ohio." Packard said he did not offer his school to Trump because he is a supporter. "My position is irrelevant," he said. "I wouldn't say I am a supporter or I'm not. I support school choice and what's relevant is the attention for high quality charter schools." Trump's visit to CASSA was not without controversy, O'Donnell writes. Critics "blasted the choice of CASSA for Trump's speech today, pointing to the school's poor grades on Ohio's 2014-15 school report cards," O'Donnell writes. "CASSA, located at 10701 Shaker Blvd., received a D for Performance Index, a composite of scores across multiple grades and subjects that Ohio uses to summarize results." Things are looking up for Trump in Ohio:  The billionaire leads Clinton in the Buckeye State by 4 points, according to a new Quinnipiac University poll. "The Quinnipiac University survey marks the first time Trump has led an Ohio presidential poll since May," cleveland.com reporter Jeremy Pelzer writes. "The survey found that Trump leads Clinton 41 percent to 37 percent among likely Ohio voters. Libertarian nominee Gary Johnson polled 14 percent, while the Green Party's Jill Stein had 4 percent support. In a head-to-head matchup, the poll found that Trump is ahead of Clinton 46 percent to 45 percent. "The results show that Ohio's presidential election may ultimately be decided by supporters of Johnson, the former governor of New Mexico, according to Peter A. Brown, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University poll." Ohio generals support Clinton: Two Ohio generals stressed their support for Clinton in Cleveland on Tuesday, ahead of Trump's visit. "Four Star Retired Gen. Johnnie Wilson, who grew up in Lorain, emphasized Clinton's commitment to the military and their families -- and said he was hurt by Trump's criticism of a Khizr Khan, a Muslim American military father who lost his son in Iraq," I write in my report. "Hillary has been a staunch supporter of the military her entire adult life," Wilson said.  "She understands what a military family endures."  Higher taxes? Ten school districts across Cuyahoga County plan to ask voters in this November for more money. "Four of those issues ask voters to approve more tax dollars for expenses. Another two are bond issues that would raise money for school construction and renovation," cleveland.com reporter Robert Higgs writes. "The remaining four issues are a combination of the two - issues that would allow the district to sell bonds for construction and improvement projects and levy a tax to pay off those bonds. They also would levy an additional tax for further improvements." Protecting victims: People who survived domestic abuse can now vote in Ohio without having their address becoming public, cleveland.com reporter Emily Bamforth writes. "The Safe At Home program aims to protect Ohioans whose abusers might seek out their public information," Bamforth writes. "Its launch comes a month before the deadline for voter registration for this year's presidential election." Marijuana and Ohio: Medical marijuana became legal in Ohio on Thursday -- but patients won't be able to purchase the drug in the Buckeye State for another year or two, cleveland.com reporter Jackie Borchardt writes. "Starting today, patients who would qualify for the program have an 'affirmative defense' against prosecution for possessing marijuana and paraphernalia that would be legal under the law, if a doctor signs off," Borchardt writes. "The affirmative defense only protects patients using one of the forms described in the law: Marijuana-infused edibles, tinctures, oils, patches and plant material. The law prohibits smoking marijuana and allows vaping, but the final list of approved forms and methods will be decided by the Ohio State Board of Pharmacy." The law doesn't make it clear how patients are supposed to procure the drug. It's illegal to grow in Ohio, and it's against federal law to bring marijuana from a legal state into Ohio. Meanwhile: A state lawmaker is asking Ohio municipalities to not ban or restrict medical marijuana. "In an open letter, Sen. Kenny Yuko acknowledged the concerns communities have about Ohio's new medical marijuana law but reminded them it will be months or even years before businesses will be growing or selling marijuana," Borchardt writes. "The Richmond Heights Democrat issued the letter on Wednesday, the day before Ohio's medical marijuana took effect." "I understand the urge to act, but keep an open mind," Yuko wrote. "Please consider all the good that this medicine can do for the citizens of your communities." Other parts of the country watching Ohio: Medical marijuana observers in Colorado, a state that helped pioneer the drug, see potential in Ohio's future marketplace. "Medicine Man was among the first medical marijuana companies in Colorado, and it plans to help Ohio businesses get off the ground. Carrie Roberts, a licensing consultant with the company's consulting arm, Medicine Man Technologies, said the law's medical conditions and allowed forms should encourage a healthy market," Borchardt writes. "The rules we've seen so far are very robust and it looks like Ohio could be a very good marketplace both for patients and business operators," Roberts told Borchardt.  Ohio Senate race: Democratic U.S. Senate nominee Ted Strickland's campaign is criticizing a new Rob Portman TV ad, which touts the senator's work on behalf of an Ohio company previously accused of delivering faulty helmets to the U.S. Army, cleveland.com reporter Jeremy Pelzer reports. The ad, seen on the air in Cleveland, highlights the Republican senator's efforts to ensure Hebron-based ArmorSource was able to successfully bid to make the Army's lightweight advanced combat helmet, securing more than 200 jobs. But earlier this year, ArmorSource paid $3 million to settle allegations that a different kind of helmet, sold to the U.S. military between 2006 and 2009, failed ballistic safety tests. Strickland campaign spokesman David Bergstein said in a statement that Portman should apologize to Ohio's military families and take down the ad. "It's hard to know what's worse: that Senator Portman would champion a company that was endangering the lives of our military service members by producing faulty helmets, or that Portman is using this same company to try and win his political campaign," Bergstein said. Portman campaign spokeswoman Michawn Rich said in a statement that the Republican incumbent is "proud" to have helped ArmorSource secure the contract. An ArmorSource spokesman didn't return a phone call Wednesday seeking comment. Beautiful politicos: Bay Village native and Rep. Tim Ryan legislative aide Samantha Fay made The Hill's 50 most beautiful list. How exciting for her. In a short profile, the 25-year-old reveals her feelings about makeup. We learn that, for Fay, "having a polished look is just as important in her professional life as having refined policy chops," The Hill writes. "Wearing makeup is like putting on your war paint," Fay told the Hill. "It calms me down, I can relax into it, and at the end of it, I feel like I am ready for anything." She also likes to dance. Get Battleground Briefing, our FREE politics newsletter, delivered to your inbox: Sign up here. Tips or links? Send here. Follow along on Twitter: @_marykilpatrick.
254 points by The Plain Dealer | Ohio Charter school Cannabis President of the United States Legality of cannabis by country Charter Hillary Rodham Clinton United States presidential election 2008
Q+A: Ex-law enforcement officer explains why he works to legalize marijuana
Jason Thomas helped carry out the war on drugs, but what he saw convinced him it wasn’t always a just cause. During his two and a half years in law enforcement ...
-1 points by Las Vegas Sun | Law Recreational drug use Decriminalization Prohibition Cannabis Cannabis Police Prison
Law officers may seek marijuana bills' veto
Marijuana activists mostly cheered Thursday’s long-awaited approval by the state Senate of bills legalizing key aspects of medical marijuana in Michigan.        
-1 points by Detroit Free Press | Cannabis United States Senate Legality of cannabis by country Veto Cannabis Mike Cox
Vote clears way for medical pot dispensaries
The bills will regulate dispensaries, the growing and distribution of medical marijuana and allow for non-smokable weed.        
-1 points by Detroit Free Press | Cannabis Legality of cannabis by country United States Senate Hashish Global Marijuana March Legal and medical status of cannabis Legality of cannabis Hemp
MI Senate OKs medical marijuana reform bills
Eight years after voters approved marijuana for medical use, the Senate OK’d a package of bills to regulate the industry        
-1 points by The Detroit News | Cannabis United States Senate Legality of cannabis by country Hashish Tetrahydrocannabinol Medicine Physician Global Marijuana March
Law officers may seek Snyder veto of medical pot bill
Marijuana activists mostly cheered Thursday’s long-awaited approval by the state Senate of bills legalizing key aspects of medical marijuana in Michigan.        
76 points by Detroit Free Press | Cannabis United States Senate Legality of cannabis by country Veto Cannabis Mike Cox
Mich. Senate OKs medical marijuana reform bills
Eight years after voters approved marijuana for medical use, the Senate OK’d a package of bills to regulate the industry        
-1 points by The Detroit News | Cannabis United States Senate Legality of cannabis by country Hashish Tetrahydrocannabinol Medicine Physician Global Marijuana March
More than 18,000 people want Gov. Christie to sign marijuana PTSD bill
For more than a month, Gov. Christie has not taken any action on a widely touted bipartisan bill that would allow people with post-traumatic stress disorder to use medical marijuana.
107 points by The Philadelphia Inquirer | United States Department of Veterans Affairs Veteran Posttraumatic stress disorder Medical cannabis Cannabis
Advocates press case for legal recreational marijuana
Legalizing marijuana for recreational use in Nevada would create thousands of jobs, reduce black market sales and generate millions of tax dollars for ...
688 points by Las Vegas Sun | Las Vegas metropolitan area Nevada Clark County Nevada Las Vegas Nevada Recreational drug use Cannabis Medical cannabis Law
New study reveals what makes marijuana edibles most attractive to young kids
Colorado's new rules for marijuana-infused edibles -- which prohibit products made in animal or fruit shapes -- take an important step to curb edibles' appeal to young children but they also may not go far enough by not regulating color, taste and smell, a recently released study suggests.
164 points by The Denver Post | Food Eating Cannabis Regulation United States Washington Hashish Appeal
Marijuana could replace tobacco as sin-tax jackpot
With fewer people smoking, cigarette tax revenue is declining. So it isn't far-fetched to imagine that pot could one day soon overtake tobacco as the better cash cow.
23 points by The Denver Post | Indirect tax Decriminalization Legalization Value added tax Regressive tax Victimless crime Cannabis Recreational drug use
Ohio lawmaker urges cities not to ban medical marijuana before state sets rules
Sen. Kenny Yuko on Wednesday urged local governments not to ban medical marijuana businesses ahead of the state's rulemaking process. COLUMBUS, Ohio -- One of the biggest medical marijuana supporters at the Ohio Statehouse is asking local governments to take a breath before banning or restricting marijuana businesses. In an open letter, Sen. Kenny Yuko acknowledged the concerns communities have about Ohio's new medical marijuana law but reminded them it will be months or even years before businesses will be growing or selling marijuana. The Richmond Heights Democrat issued the letter on Wednesday, the day before Ohio's medical marijuana took effect. A handful of Ohio communities have banned marijuana cultivators, processors and dispensaries and dozens more have enacted temporary bans of six months or longer. Leaders in those communities say they need more time to study the law and decide if they want to impose further regulations on marijuana businesses. But licenses are unlikely to be issued in the next six months. Three state regulatory agencies have until May to finish the rules and regulations for cultivators and until next September for all other businesses. "I understand the urge to act, but keep an open mind," Yuko wrote. "Please consider all the good that this medicine can do for the citizens of your communities." Yuko said medical marijuana entrepreneurs live in urban and rural areas and urged local leaders to consider the economic opportunities for their residents. He encouraged communities to seek public comment before enacting marijuana regulations. (Read the letter below.) Ohio's medical marijuana law allows people with about 20 medical conditions to buy and use marijuana if recommended by a doctor. The law prohibits smoking but allows vaping. The law does not allow people to grow their own. Dispensaries won't likely open for a year or two as state regulators work through many of the details, including how many business licenses will be available and how people will apply to get them. Yuko wrote that local governments will have plenty of time to act once the rules are written. Ohio legalized medical marijuana: Here's what you need to know Until then, some patients will be able to assert an "affirmative defense" against prosecution for possessing marijuana and paraphernalia that would be legal under the law, if a doctor signs off. Local governments cannot ban medical marijuana use. They cannot ban or limit marijuana research conducted at a state university, academic medical center or private research and developmentorganization. But cities can regulate marijuana businesses in three ways: Limit the number of cultivators, processors or retail dispensaries licensed within the municipal corporation or unincorporated territory of the township. Prohibit cultivators, processors or retail dispensaries. Regulate the location of cultivators, processors or retail dispensaries through zoning boards. A few communities have rejected bans, saying such a move would be premature. At least one Ohio community has said it would welcome medical marijuana businesses. Mobile readers, click here to read Yuko's letter. // DV.load("https://www.documentcloud.org/documents/3104602-Yuko-letter-to-local-governments-09072016.js", { width: 600, height: 800, sidebar: false, container: "#DV-viewer-3104602-Yuko-letter-to-local-governments-09072016" }); // ]]>
76 points by The Plain Dealer | Law Cannabis Legality of cannabis by country Regulation
Vote clears way for Mich. pot dispensaries
The bills will regulate dispensaries, the growing and distribution of medical marijuana and allow for non-smokable weed.        
-1 points by Detroit Free Press | Cannabis United States Senate Legality of cannabis by country Hashish Lansing Michigan Global Marijuana March Bill Clinton United States Constitution
Vote clears way for Michigan medical pot dispensaries
The bills will regulate dispensaries, the growing and distribution of medical marijuana and allow for non-smokable weed.        
2848 points by Detroit Free Press | Cannabis United States Senate Legality of cannabis by country Hashish Lansing Michigan Global Marijuana March Bill Clinton United States Constitution
Primary survey: Chichester, Pembroke has four-way GOP race for three House seats
Peter Gagyi Party: Republican Age: 64 Town of residence: Pembroke Occupation: self-employed, tool and die maker Incumbent? No Do you support . . .Commuter rail funding? I don’t support commuter rail funding; it will require a huge amount of taxes to keep running.Providing more state money for high...
11 points by Concord Monitor | New Hampshire Legal and medical status of cannabis State income tax Minimum wage Cannabis Sales taxes in the United States
Katz Boutique to pay $1.75 million in Kush settlement with state
A Houston-area smoke shop and adult novelty store have agreed to pay nearly 2 million dollars to the state after an undercover sting operation showed the business sold synthetic marijuana.
94 points by The Houston Chronicle | Cannabinoid Psychosis Violence Schizophrenia HU-210 Deception Injunction Cannabis
Primary survey: Two-term Democratic state rep in Concord Ward 10 faces challenger
Christy Dolat Bartlett Party: Democrat Age: 65 Town of residence: Concord Occupation: retired Incumbent? If so, how many terms? Two terms Do you support . . .Commuter rail funding? I am leaning in favor but would like more information about the ongoing projected costs and benefits to the state.Provi...
7 points by Concord Monitor | Minimum wage Cannabis Rail transport New Hampshire Legality of cannabis by country Democracy Tetrahydrocannabinol Legal and medical status of cannabis
Colorado hits another cannabis 1st with certified hemp seed
FRUITA, Colo. (AP) - Colorado is expected to reach another national first on cannabis Wednesday when state agriculture officials show off the first domestic certified hemp seeds. The Colorado Department of Agriculture has been working for years to produce hemp seeds that consistently produce plants low enough in the chemical ...
-1 points by The Washington Times | Hemp Cannabis Cannabis Plant Colorado Hemp oil U.S. state Certification
Philly420: How Pennsylvania can decriminalize marijuana

-1 points by The Philadelphia Inquirer | Crime Criminal law Criminal justice Misdemeanor Prison Cannabis Police August Vollmer
Questions remain as Ohio marijuana law takes effect
Ohio has yet to outline how exactly its new medical marijuana law will work even as it takes effect Thursday        
-1 points by The Detroit News | Law USA PATRIOT Act Cannabis United States Congress Supreme Court of the United States Physician Federal Bureau of Investigation United States
Colorado marijuana businesses optimistic about Ohio medical marijuana law (video)
Marijuana companies from Colorado and other states have been following Ohio's medical marijuana law. Carrie Roberts from Medicine Man Technologies explains why the consulting company is interested in Ohio's medical marijuana market. Watch video DENVER, Colorado -- When Ohio lawmakers voted to legalize medical marijuana earlier this year, the rest of the country was watching.  Ohio has twice the population of Colorado, considered the pioneer for state-regulated medical and recreational marijuana programs. And Ohio's list of acceptable medical conditions includes chronic pain, which usually means a larger patient pool and thus larger market for marijuana businesses.  Ohio's market could produce between $200 and $400 million in annual sales, according to an analysis by trade publication Marijuana Business Daily.  But the details of Ohio's program have yet to be worked out. Three regulatory agencies could take up to two years to complete them. Ohio legalized medical marijuana: Here's what you need to know Still, marijuana businesses and industry leaders are optimistic about Ohio's law.  Medicine Man was among the first medical marijuana companies in Colorado, and it plans to help Ohio businesses get off the ground. Carrie Roberts, a licensing consultant with the company's consulting arm, Medicine Man Technologies, said the law's medical conditions and allowed forms should encourage a healthy market.  "The rules we've seen so far are very robust and it looks like Ohio could be a very good marketplace both for patients and business operators," Roberts said.  Shawn Coleman, a lobbyist for marijuana company Terrapin Care Station, said Ohio was more progressive than other states in some areas.  Ohio's law bars people from getting a marijuana business license if they've been convicted of a felony or certain other crimes within the past five years, compared to 10 years in Colorado, Coleman said. Ohio's law also mandates 15 percent of marijuana business licenses must go to minority business owners. It's a first, and its constitutionality could be challenged in court.  Coleman said state lawmakers should look to Colorado's legislature for an example of how to work on the issue in a bipartisan way. He said Ohio regulators should keep patients in mind when crafting rules and avoid burdensome restrictions. "We can't legislate to the people who shouldn't have it," Coleman said. "We should legislate to the people who actually need it."
56 points by The Plain Dealer | Law Medicine License Cannabis Victimless crime Tetrahydrocannabinol Business Legalization
Cops: Mom smoked pot to celebrate 1st day of school
When cops pulled over a car speeding in a school zone on Tuesday morning, a telltale scent wafted from the window,       
251 points by USA Today | Cannabis Cannabis Smoke Driving Psychoactive drug Automobile English-language films American films
Montel Williams launching new medical marijuana line
TV personality Montel Williams is kicking a new weed-based business venture into high gear.
5261 points by Daily News | Multiple sclerosis Medical cannabis Neuropathic pain Cannabis Pain Medicine Tetrahydrocannabinol Cannabis sativa
Congress could be changing its tune on marijuana
Stephanie Akin, Roll Call Congress is leaning toward decriminalizing marijuana at the federal level -- and it's going to happen soon.
450 points by UPI | Cannabis Legality of cannabis by country United States Congress Hashish Global Marijuana March Legal and medical status of cannabis Legality of cannabis Hemp
More medical marijuana delays possible as officials seek diversity
The head of the state's medical marijuana commission said Tuesday the panel has not ruled out further delay to the program to ensure racial diversity among cannabis business owners. "Nothing is off the table," Maryland Cannabis Commission Chairman Paul Davies said after meeting with Attorney General...
-1 points by Baltimore Sun | Dispensary Medical cannabis Cannabis
Why marijuana legalization in liberal Mass. might be a tough sell
Deep-blue Massachusetts has a recent history of marijuana-friendly votes. In 2008, voters turned out in droves at the ballot box to decriminalize possession of less than an ounce of pot. Four years later, advocates were rewarded with a landslide victory to legalize medical marijuana in the state. The third act is set for November, when Massachusetts voters will […]
374 points by The Boston Globe | Elections Election Referendum Initiative Voting Marijuana Policy Project Ballot Cannabis
Primary survey: Three Republicans vie for chance to face House incumbents
Joseph M. AlibrandiParty: Republican Age: 54Town: Hillsboro Occupation: scientist/ product development engineer Incumbent? No, first time running for any office. Do you support . . .Commuter rail funding? I do not support taxpayers funding the commuter rail. I am for creating jobs in N.H. and this...
9 points by Concord Monitor | Minimum wage Decriminalization Cannabis United States Constitution Legalization Legal and medical status of cannabis Legality of cannabis by country Education
Primary survey: Three Republicans vie for Epsom, Pittsfield House seat
David J. PalfreyParty: RepublicanAge: 78Town of Residence: EpsomOccupation: retired from a career in bankingIncumbent? Served in House of Representatives from 2008 through 2012Do you support . . .Commuter rail funding? I do not support commuter rail funding as studies have shown it would require a...
3 points by Concord Monitor | United States House of Representatives Cannabis Law Legality of cannabis by country Legal and medical status of cannabis United States Congress Public transport United States Constitution
Primary survey: Franklin Ward 3, Northfield sees three-way race for two House seats
Deborah H. Wheeler Party: Democrat Age: 72 Town of residence: Northfield Occupation: retired Incumbent? Yes. Three terms; running for my fourth.Do you support . . .Commuter rail funding? Yes Providing more state money for higher education? Yes Pro-gun legislation, such as constitutional carry? I wou...
7 points by Concord Monitor | Minimum wage New Hampshire Disability Cannabis Drug addiction Addiction Merrimack County New Hampshire Funding
Medical marijuana is now legal in Ohio but not much changes for patients
Ohio's medical marijuana law takes effect Sept. 8, but little will change for patients, law enforcement officials and physicians. COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Medical marijuana is now legal in Ohio, but -- and it's a big but -- patients won't be able to legally buy it here for at least a year, maybe two.  Until then, Ohio's new medical marijuana law gives patients an "affirmative defense" against a drug charge, if they have a doctor's note and meet other criteria. But patients haven't had much luck obtaining such notes ahead of the law's effective date today, another example to add to the law's long list of unknowns.  Also on that list: How many growers and dispensaries will be allowed? What will doctors have to do in order to recommend medical marijuana?   So although today has been on the calendars of many Ohio advocates, it's a largely symbolic date that most consider the starting line in what could be a complicated path to a working medical marijuana program.  What happens today  Starting today, patients who would qualify for the program have an "affirmative defense" against prosecution for possessing marijuana and paraphernalia that would be legal under the law, if a doctor signs off. The patient's physician must certify in writing that a bona fide relationship exists, the patient has one of about 20 qualifying conditions and that they have discussed the benefits and risks to using medical marijuana. Ohio legalized medical marijuana: Here's what you need to know Nicole Scholten of Cincinnati, whose 12-year-old daughter Lucy has cerebral palsy and epilepsy, said the majority of patients she knows have not had success obtaining an affirmative defense note. Scholten is hopeful Lucy's doctors and other health care professionals will support medical marijuana use but said more education is needed.  "I encourage patients to be cautious because the affirmative defense is really a theory," Scholten said. "It's not a tested theory and it's a theory no one wants to test. Patients should not think all is accepted and well."  June: Ohio medical marijuana law allows limited possession, use on Sept. 8 but doesn't say where people can get it The affirmative defense only protects patients using one of the forms described in the law: Marijuana-infused edibles, tinctures, oils, patches and plant material. The law prohibits smoking marijuana and allows vaping, but the final list of approved forms and methods will be decided by the Ohio State Board of Pharmacy. The law is silent on where patients are supposed to get their marijuana and doesn't allow people to grow their own. Bringing marijuana into Ohio from a legal state would violate federal law.  And the affirmative defense is just that, a defense in court that would come into play after arrest. It won't protect patients from being fired for marijuana use -- employers' right to do so is explicitly protected in the law. What doctors are doing Most Ohio physicians are waiting for the rules and regulations or at least some guidance from the Ohio State Medical Board.   The board plans to issue some guidance, spokeswoman Tessie Pollock said, but not this week.  The Ohio State Medical Association, which represents thousands of Ohio physicians, has recommended its members not act at this time. Association spokesman Reggie Fields said the affirmative defense part of the law has caused a lot of confusion among patients and doctors.  "The affirmative defense piece allows a doctor to certify a person has a condition but there's no real system in place to outline exactly what that certification process is," Fields said. "There's still not a formal standard of care for using medical marijuana in Ohio."   Physicians might be more willing to talk about marijuana with their patients after Thursday. The law grants immunity to doctors from civil liability, criminal prosecution and discipline from the state medical and pharmacy boards for advising patients use medical marijuana, discussing the drug with them or monitoring a patient's treatment with marijuana. What police are doing Ohio Fraternal Order of Police President Jay McDonald said the law won't likely change what law enforcement officers do. McDonald, a Marion police officer working on a county-wide drug task force, said that could change after the rules are written.  Until then, McDonald said, officers are likely to take into account an affirmative defense note before making an arrest.  "While it's a defense to be applied in the courtroom, in most cases for affirmative defenses written in state law, the officers take that and apply it on the scene," McDonald said.  What prospective patients are doing Tara Cordle has the start of the marijuana law marked on her calendar with the importance of a family birthday. Cordle hopes cannabis will help her 10-year-old son Waylon, who has intractable epilepsy. Waylon suffers numerous seizures a day despite taking five different medications.  Cordle has collected signatures for every marijuana measure since 2012, including last year's recreational measure, Issue 3. She said she's relieved she won't have to work on yet another failed ballot initiative and the new law is better than nothing. "A lot of people hate the law and think it's not good enough but it's something," Cordle said. "Just having the legislators speaking about it -- that's a huge thing."  Cordle said Waylon's doctors aren't on board yet, but she will try to obtain an affirmative defense note. "When you've been told your son's not going to make it, you do whatever you need to do," Cordle said. "Two years is a life or death situation to a lot of people including my son and I can't justify waiting." What happens next  Sept. 8 starts the clock for several deadlines in the new law:  Oct. 8: The governor and legislative leaders from both parties must appoint 14 members to a new medical marijuana advisory committee by this date. Speaker Cliff Rosenberger issued a call for people interested in representing mental health professionals or patients to send a resume to his office at [email protected] May 6, 2017: The Ohio Department of Commerce must complete rules and regulations for marijuana cultivators, including how many cultivation licenses will be available and how people apply for them.  Sept. 8, 2017: The Ohio Board of Pharmacy must complete rules and regulations for marijuana dispensaries and develop the process for registering patients in the program. The Ohio State Medical Board must decide how Ohio physicians can obtain a certificate to recommend medical marijuana. The Department of Commerce must finish rules and regulations for marijuana processors and testing labs.  Sept. 8, 2018: The program must be "fully operational." Two of the three agencies are staffing up in preparation for the new law and plan to spend about $1.8 million setting up the program.  The state has set up a website, medicalmarijuana.ohio.gov, to provide updates on the regulatory process. Qualifying medical conditions Patients qualify if they have the following conditions: HIV/AIDS; Alzheimer's disease; Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); cancer; chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE); Crohn's disease; epilepsy or another seizure disorder; fibromyalgia; glaucoma; hepatitis C; inflammatory bowel disease; multiple sclerosis; pain that is chronic, severe, and intractable; Parkinson's disease; post traumatic stress disorder; sickle cell anemia; spinal cord disease or injury; Tourette's syndrome; traumatic brain injury; and ulcerative colitis. 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1041 points by The Plain Dealer | Physician Law Cannabis Ulcerative colitis Inflammatory bowel disease Affirmative defense Defense Posttraumatic stress disorder
Ohio's medical marijuana program has to be operational within 2 years (timeline)
Find out more about how Ohio's medical marijuana law came to be and when the various pieces should take effect in the timeline below. COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Ohio's new medical marijuana law takes effect Thursday but it could be years before patients can legally buy marijuana here. That's because the new law leaves much of the details for Ohio's medical marijuana program to three regulatory agencies. The law gives them two years to set everything up, with a few other deadlines along the way. Find out more about how Ohio's law came to be and when the various pieces should take effect in the timeline below.
21 points by The Plain Dealer | Law Cannabis Legality of cannabis by country Regulation Administrative law LAW The Various Legal research
Colorado marijuana industry finds veterans as protectors
It’s nighttime at the Herbal Cure, a south Denver marijuana shop and grow house tucked into a parking lot beside the highway. Inside is a marijuana bounty: thousands of dollars’ worth of ...
-1 points by Las Vegas Sun | Cannabis Police Cannabis cultivation Security guard Theft Denver Police Department Cannabis
The Latest: Alaska delays on pot use in marijuana stores
JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) - The Latest on actions by Alaska marijuana regulators (all times local): 11:40 a.m. Alaska marijuana regulators have delayed by at least another month a decision on allowing people to buy marijuana products to smoke, inhale or consume in food in authorized stores. The Marijuana Control Board ...
-1 points by The Washington Times | Retailing Consumer protection Smoke Regulation Cannabis Management Hashish Global Marijuana March
Marijuana clients prompt recusal of Ohio medical board chief
The head of Ohio's state medical board says he won't participate in establishing rules for certifying doctors under Ohio's new medical marijuana law after taking on lobbying clients associated with the budding industry. COLUMBUS, Ohio -- The head of Ohio's state medical board says he won't participate in establishing rules for certifying doctors under Ohio's new medical marijuana law after taking on lobbying clients associated with the budding industry. Records reviewed by The Associated Press show Mike Gonidakis recently acquired two out-of-state marijuana-related clients, Denver-based Marijuana Policy Group and Scottsdale, Arizona-based Pharm LLC, a medical marijuana grower. Gonidakis, who also serves as president of the anti-abortion group Ohio Right to Life, confirmed his recusal in an interview with the AP. He said neither client has business before the medical board, but he wants to avoid even the appearance of a conflict. Mike Gonidakis  "The only thing that the medical board's doing is setting rules for doctors, and I'll be recusing myself on that," he said. Ohio's medical marijuana law takes effect Thursday. It's the second time in a month Gonidakis has said he'll step aside to avoid any appearance of a conflict on the 12-member board. He also said he won't vote on any abortion clinic-related complaints before the board. In August, groups representing doctors, consumers and women sought Gonidakis' removal as president, citing his alleged conflicts. The request has so far gone nowhere. Under Ohio's new medical marijuana law, the medical board will have one of its highest profile roles in recent memory. The law empowers the panel to determine procedures for doctors to get certified to recommend cannabis to patients, to set conditions for eligibility and determine how often certifications must be renewed. The commission also will set reasons a certification might be revoked or suspended, standards under which those actions could be lifted and minimal standards of care when recommending treatment with medical marijuana. Gonidakis, an attorney, said recusals on the physician-dominated board -- and on most state boards and commissions, for that matter -- are commonplace. Under guidance from the Ohio Ethics Commission, recusals include not only abstaining from votes but also from discussions or deliberations on the matter in which a board member seeks to avoid a conflict. Gonidakis was appointed to a five-year term on the medical board by Republican Gov. John Kasich in 2012 as a representative of consumers.
44 points by The Plain Dealer | Associated Press Cannabis Legality of cannabis by country Cannabis Tetrahydrocannabinol Cannabis sativa Hashish Conflict of interest
National pot group plots Michigan legalization plan
The Marijuana Policy Project is working on a legalization ballot plan in Michigan but faces early criticism        
-1 points by The Detroit News | Cannabis Legality of cannabis by country Cannabis Hashish Global Marijuana March Marijuana Policy Project Michigan Legal and medical status of cannabis
DEA approves synthetic marijuana for big pharma company against legalization
A synthetic marijuana product could be available for commercialization after the DEA gave a newly approved drug a schedule II classification. Read Full Article at RT.com
850 points by Russia Today | Controlled Substances Act Drug control law Tetrahydrocannabinol Cannabis Morphine Drug Enforcement Administration Drug addiction Recreational drug use
Tunisia's proposed drug law spurs debate
Amid rising prison numbers, legislators are considering a contentious new law to abolish sentences for some offenders.
-1 points by Al Jazeera English | Prison Human rights Law Illegal drug trade Crime Drug Zine El Abidine Ben Ali Cannabis
Police: Five arrested in ongoing heroin investigation
Howard County police detectives arrested five people in Elkridge over the weekend accused of distributing heroin in connection to an ongoing investigation. The arrests were made following search warrants at two separate locations in the 6700 block of Deep Run Parkway, police said. During the first...
-2 points by Baltimore Sun | Police Cocaine Criminal Investigation Department Drug addiction Detective Cannabis Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution Criminal law
More medical marijuana licenses would be awarded in deal reached by Maryland legislative leaders
General Assembly leaders have coalesced around a plan to issue an additional five medical marijuana growing licenses and increase the likelihood that several of those lucrative deals go to minority-owned companies. The consensus emerging in Annapolis about how to revamp the state's fledgling medical...
-1 points by Baltimore Sun | Medical cannabis Cannabis
License of pot-friendly Illinois doctor placed on probation
CHICAGO (AP) - An Illinois physician has reached an agreement with the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation that limits his ability to make pot recommendations. In 2015, Illinois regulators contended Dr. Bodo Schneider charged patients for pot recommendations at offices in southern Illinois and suburban Chicago without a ...
-1 points by The Washington Times | Physician Cannabis Patient Health care provider Tetrahydrocannabinol Cannabis sativa Legality of cannabis by country Medicine
DA's new plan would keep low-level pot smokers out of jail, save officers time
Thousands of casual pot smokers will keep clean records and Harris County will save more than $25 million a year under the district attorney's new "pre-charge diversion" program for those caught with small amounts of marijuana.
5 points by The Houston Chronicle | Crime Criminal law Police Cannabis Hashish Legal and medical status of cannabis Global Marijuana March Prohibition
Research: Although known for stomach-calming properties, smoking pot can make you throw up
Just as every story has at least two sides, it turns out that marijuana has some properties with opposite effects. According to research at Temple University in Philadelphia, increased use of marijuana has led to the recognition of a condition known as Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome.
3 points by The Houston Chronicle | Nervous system Vomiting Central nervous system Cannabis Neurology The Colbert Report Stephen Colbert Cannabis
Patrick blasts Ogg's pot policy, but other lawmakers more supportive
Harris County officials' move to decriminalize low-level possession of marijuana to unclog jails and courts drew immediate blowback from Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, while other lawmakers said they support it.
12 points by The Houston Chronicle | Police Crime Cannabis Criminal law Legality of cannabis by country Law Criminal justice Lieutenant
Colorado warms to pot clubs despite federal uncertainty
DENVER — At risk of raising the ire of the White House, Colorado is on the brink of becoming the first state with licensed pot clubs. But the details of how these clubs will operate are as hazy as the underground clubs operating already.Denver officials are working on regulations to open a one-year pilot of bring-your-own marijuana clubs, while state lawmakers are expected to consider measures to allow either marijuana "tasting rooms" run by marijuana dispensaries, or smoke-friendly clubs akin to cigar bars.
-2 points by Boston Herald | Cannabis Legality of cannabis by country Hashish Global Marijuana March Legal and medical status of cannabis Hemp Denver Legality of cannabis
New policy to decriminalize marijuana in Harris County will save time, money, DA’s office says
Houston and Harris County are poised to decriminalize low-level possession of marijuana in a sweeping move that puts the area at the forefront of efforts in Texas to halt minor drug arrests that clog jails and courts.
7172 points by The Houston Chronicle | Crime Police Arrest Criminal justice Prison Cannabis Criminal law Legality of cannabis by country