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SWAT team responds to man barricaded inside Parma home
The SWAT team is on the scene after a man barricaded himself inside a Parma home Friday morning, police said. PARMA, Ohio -- The SWAT team is on the scene after a man barricaded himself inside a Parma home Friday morning, police said. About 10:15 a.m., Parma police Lt. Kevin Riley confirmed the SWAT team was at a home in the area of Broadview Road and Panorama Drive. Police did not know if the man had a weapon or was holding hostages, Riley said. An emergency alert sent out by Cuyahoga County around the same time said a male was ejected from a vehicle during a crash in the 6500 block of Broadview Road. Rescuers could not get to the crash victim because of the man barricaded in the home, the alert said. Riley said he did not know if the crash was related to the standoff. This is a developing story. A cleveland.com reporter is en route to the scene. If you wish to discuss or comment on this story, please visit our crime and courts comments section. Like Chanda Neely on Facebook. Follow me on Twitter: Follow @ChandaNeely // !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+'://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js';fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document, 'script', 'twitter-wjs'); // ]]>
212 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Police Parma Ohio Broadview Heights Ohio North Royalton Ohio SWAT Ohio Brecksville Ohio
View photos submitted for Best High School Marching Band contest; send yours from tonight's game
Check out some of the photos that have been submitted by readers as part of a nomination for cleveland.com's Best High School Marching Band contest. CLEVELAND, Ohio - As nominations for cleveland.com's Best High School Marching Band contest continue to come in, so do the photos and videos. More than 100 parents, students, faculty, alumni and community members have shared a glimpse of their favorite marching band in Greater Cleveland. Dozens of area schools have been nominated for inclusion in the contest. Click through the gallery above to see some of the many photos we've received as part of nominations. And while you're out at a football game this week or next week, send your nomination along with a picture and/or video to [email protected] or use the comments section below. Nominations are being accepted until Monday, Sept. 19 at 5 p.m. Be sure to include a short description on what makes the band so great, memorable moments and why it should be chosen to be included in the contest. We welcome pictures and/or videos of the band in action to help us decide if the band should advance to the first round of online voting. Or send a link to the band's Twitter page or links to Tweets or other social media posts we should check out. The only limitation is the high school must be located within our seven-county coverage area, which consists of Cuyahoga, Summit, Medina, Lorain, Lake, Geauga and Portage counties. Best Band contest dates: Here is a rundown on how the Best High School Marching Band contest will work. Now-Sept. 19: Nominations accepted from schools, bands, students, parents, fans -- you name it. Sept. 22-28: The bands that have been selected for the first round of the contest will be announced and the opening round of online voting will be held to determine the eight finalists. Voting totals in this round will also determine the eight seeds for the remainder of the contest. Sept. 29-Oct. 5: Voting in the quarterfinals round. Oct. 6-12: Voting in the semifinals round. Oct. 13-20: Voting in the final round to determine the winner of Greater Cleveland's Best High School Marching Band contest.
20 points by The Plain Dealer | High school Cuyahoga County Ohio The Band Remainder Candidate Greater Cleveland Nomination Education
Hundreds of Verizon customers are battling data over-limit fees: Money Matters
In the last week, I've heard from about 400 Verizon customers, mostly in Ohio but some from other states too. Most have iPhones. Some have Droids. All have seen their data use through Verizon jump significantly -- doubling or tripling since the spring in many cases, even though their cell phone habits haven't changed. Data costs money. It's been an interesting week. Last weekend, I wrote about a sudden surge in my family's cell phone data through Verizon. In my unscientific survey that lasted one week, every friend and acquaintance I asked said they were having the same problem: Their monthly data use had been soaring in recent months for no apparent reason. In some cases, using more data meant hefty over-limit fees. Well, well, well. Since my column ran a week ago, I've heard from about 400 Verizon customers, mostly in Ohio but some from other states too. Most have iPhones. Some have Droids. All have seen their data use through Verizon jump significantly -- doubling or tripling since the spring in many cases, even though their cell phone habits haven't changed. Data costs money. If you're getting hit by data over-limit charges, you might take comfort knowing you're not alone, no matter what Verizon tells you. And you may be encouraged by a couple of things: I've gotten a few answers this week. And I'm not done yet.   To check your phone's Wi-Fi settings: On an iPhone, go to Settings, then Cellular. Go all the way to the bottom. Make sure the Wi-Fi Assist toggle is off (not green). On a Droid, the button is called Avoid Bad Wi-Fi or Smart Network Switch or something similar, depending on the phone. Go to Settings, then Wi-Fi, then Menu, then Advanced. You should see some sort of Wi-Fi connection option that you can turn off. Like me, many Verizon customers' data use is soaring even when they're on their home Wi-Fi the majority of the time. Even when their phone settings are changed to prevent the phone from switching to data if the Wi-Fi is weak. Verizon is logging data on people's accounts when they are sleeping and not using their phones.  Or being used when their phones are off. Or when the phone's owner has died. A typical person who uses his phone a lot while not on Wi-Fi for things like email, GPS, or checking Facebook might use 2 GB a month. If you watch a lot of videos, or stream, or download things while not on Wi-Fi, you'll use a lot more. One unhappy Verizon customer is Barb McCullough of Parma Heights. She has an old flip phone that can't use data. Data is blocked on the line. But Verizon says her phone is using data. Granted, the amounts are minuscule -- 1.02 MB a month (not GB, but MB). But this ridiculous "data usage," which seems impossible, makes her skeptical of her entire bill from Verizon. McCullough noticed this data use on her flip phone after digging into her bill. The bigger problem is that she and her husband four months ago decided to cut their phone bill by $40 a month by downsizing from unlimited data to a 6 GB plan. Her husband had been using only about 4 GB, so 6 GB seemed like more than enough. But since changing plans in April, he keeps getting alerts every month that he's near his limit, even though he's almost always on their home Wi-Fi. And Verizon hasn't been able answer why McCullough's "dumb" phone with no data or internet capability is using data, she said. Then there's Ron Staso of Cleveland. His family's use has jumped from 30 GB a month to almost 60 GB, according to Verizon. Staso can't figure out why. He just knows Verizon says he racked up over-limit fees of $1,600. After two decades with Verizon, Staso changed to T-Mobile. "I have not had any problems since I switched to T-Mobile," he said. But he refuses to pay the $1,600. Julie Wilson's over-limit charges are less dramatic but she's just as ticked off. Her family's usage has more than doubled in the last four months, from 2.5 GB to about 6 GB, again with no change in cellular habits. When the New York resident complained to Verizon about her $15 over-limit fee, they suggested she change plans. But that would cost her $40 more a month, above the $104 she's paying right now.  She refuses to change from her grandfathered, lower-priced plan.   To file a complaint about Verizon with the FCC Online: https://consumercomplaints.fcc.gov/hc/en-us By phone: 1-888-225-5322. (888-CALL-FCC) When Theresa Cancila of Baltimore called Verizon recently to complain about her family's head-scratching increase in data, she got talked into increasing her plan to save money. Verizon assured her she could get 8 GB a month for the same cost as her current 6 GB. But instead of her bill remaining the same, she got charged a $15 over-limit fee for going over 6 GB, plus $10 more for the new plan that was supposed to be the same cost. She's furious and thinks Verizon is squeezing customers.  "They keep changing the data plans so you keep getting sucked into higher plans," she said. "It's funny because I have been asking people, 'Have you noticed you are blowing through a lot of data lately?' And every time I am getting, 'Yes!' " Perhaps few cases are more stunning than Joyce Shinn's. Her son Stephen is almost always on Wi-Fi, but a few months ago, he started exceeding his 18 GB per month plan. That's more than a lot of families use combined. But her son ran over, racking up $75 in over-limit fees last month. He swears he hasn't changed his cell phone habits. "I talked to Verizon and they gave me some bull about his turning off some setting or another," said Shinn, of Highland Heights. "My son, like most young adults, is pretty phone savvy so I was sure he knew what to do." The troubling part of Shinn's data usage woes is this: Her husband died 18 months ago. "I kept his phone active until recently so I could deal with any business or other calls that might come in that needed to be addressed. " His phone suddenly started using small amounts of data. Shinn insists her late husband's phone isn't used for anything other than looking at phone numbers of missed calls or dealing with incoming calls. How, she asks, is her late husband's phone using data? Overall, she's upset about the over-limit fees -- $75 on her son's account and $30 on hers. But more than that, she's upset that she's being deceived. "We are definitely being ripped off," Shinn said. Karen Savena of Broadview Heights feels the same. Her oldest son has a 6 GB per month plan, and usage has been inexplicably soaring since spring. When he reaches his data limit each month, he immediately shuts off his data. Yet every month for the last four month, his data exceeded his limit. The totals: 6.00900; GB 6.00200; GB 6.01100 GB; and 6.00400 GB. How did he exceed 6 GB? Verizon notified him when he reached his limit. It's the notification that Verizon sent that pushed him over. Yes, the alert is what caused the $10 over-limit fee. If that doesn't make you irate, chew on a few things I learned this month when I talked with Stephen Van Dinter, a manager for Verizon's Great Lakes region. Verizon insists that many customers' problems hinge on the infamous "Wi-Fi Assist" button, Van Dinter said. With iPhones, this is automatically "on" under iOS9, which was introduced a year ago. This allows the phone to switch to costly data if the phone decides the internet connection is poor. What's the definition of "poor"? Dunno. Right now, that's a secret. But it racks up data. With Droids, the default on this Wi-Fi function is off. However, even customers with Droids are seeing surges in data.  Verizon says that when my phone records, and those of hundreds of other people, show data usage in the middle of the night, that's not really accurate. If the records show you used data at 1:47 a.m., for example, when you were fast asleep, that may not be accurate. Verizon reports data in six-hour windows, Van Dinter said. So data usage at 1:47 a.m. may not really have been at 1:47 a.m., he said. "It could be at any hour in that six-hour time frame."  I believe Verizon realizes it has a problem with over-limit charges. That must be the reason the company just this week rolled out its "safety mode" feature for all new plans at no extra charge. It works like this: When you reach your data limit, whatever level you're paying for, Verizon will allow you to continue using data -- but at a much slower speed of 128 kbps for the rest of the billing cycle. So you'll go over your limit, but you won't pay extra, Van Dinter said. Until this past week, "safety mode" cost $5 a month unless you had a new plan of 16 GB or more. So if you were a normal family with 2 or 4 or 8 GB, which is enough for most households, you had to pay extra for "safety mode." Until now. So back to my account. My family's use has basically doubled from 8 GB to 16 GB a month. The Verizon manager, Van Dinter, said that a supervisor in customer service could dig into the specifics of my account and answer a lot of the questions about my usage. That should help me answer other people's questions and we can all get to the bottom of this mystery that is dipping into our wallets. I'm still waiting for that follow-up call. I have a long list of questions for Verizon, and a few for Apple. Here they are: Why are people's phones using data at times when they're on their home Wi-Fi and the Wi-Fi Assist button is off? If there's any truth to that six-hour window thing, consider this: I walked my dog at 8 a.m. Tuesday. I walked him again at 8:30 a.m. Wednesday. In between that time, I didn't leave my house except to take out the trash and to check the mailbox. (It was too darn hot!) I didn't leave my property for about 24 hours. I was on my home's very strong Wi-Fi. My Wi-Fi Assist button is off. Why did my phone ping cellular data 11 times during this period? Why are people's phones using data in the middle of the night when the phones aren't being used and are turned off or on do-not-disturb?  Why do people still go over their data even if they totally turn off their data as soon as they're notified that they're at their limit? How can phones with the data function blocked use data? Do new (replacement) phones use data differently? Like if you get a new 6s to replace your old 6s? If Safety Mode is such a great customer service, why was it just offered as a free option this week for all customers with new plans? If Safety Mode is such as great customer service, why isn't it available for all customers?  If Verizon has known for a year that the Wi-Fi Assist button was causing many customers to use data without their knowledge, why not send a push text to all customers or include an alert with people's bills?  If the Wi-Fi Assist or Avoid Bad Wi-Fi features have been a problem for a year, why did customers start encountering data surges only four or five months ago? And the data use has continued to increase every month for many customers without explanation. When customers call Verizon to complain about data usage, why is the default response from customer service to recommend that they switch their plans and increase their data usage? Why aren't all customers encouraged to look at their Wi-Fi Assist or Avoid Bad Wi-Fi buttons, or their Background App Refresh button, or their Location Services, or other things that could drive up data use? Instead, the customary response given to customers is often: Buy more data. If the times of the data pings aren't necessarily accurate and are really only within a six-hour window, how is it that the phone call time stamps are accurate to the minute?   For people who have their Wi-Fi Assist/ Avoid Bad Wi-Fi buttons turned on, what's the definition of "poor" Wi-Fi? Who makes that determination? Apple or another phone manufacturer? Verizon?  I'd rather be the one to make that decision rather than allow my phone to decide what Wi-Fi strength is acceptable. Some people say that Verizon has told them that their phones sleep when they're not used for long periods. Supposedly, during this time, the phones revert to the LTE data network instead of Wi-Fi. Is this true?   Some people say that Verizon has told them their phones are pinged in the middle of the night to make sure they're working. Is this true? Will customers who were harangued into increasing their data usage be able to switch back to their old plan at the same price? I expect to get answers from Verizon, Apple, regulators and others. Stay tuned.
211720 points by The Plain Dealer | Data Cuyahoga County Ohio Laptop AT&T Telephone Mobile phone Bill Nintendo DS
See the Ohio and U.S. State of the Climate overview for August
NOAA has released the August 2016 regional, statewide, and nationwide climate analysis.
5 points by The Plain Dealer | United States Cuyahoga County Ohio Cleveland Ohio Climate Drought Cuyahoga River Temperature
Mother says special needs son forcibly baptized; robber calls judge 'slave master'; infant dies at homeless shelter: Overnight News Links
Also, Donald Trump leads Hillary Clinton in latest Ohio poll; Cleveland Beer Week director accused of stealing $40,000 in scholarship money; Avon police sergeant admits having one beer before drunken-driving arrest Featured stories Mother says special needs son was forcibly baptized at Geauga County church (WKYC Channel 3) Bank robber who acted as own attorney calls Lake County judge 'slave master' at sentencing (News-Herald) Infant who died at Dayton homeless shelter was a twin (Dayton Daily News) Crime Cleveland Beer Week director accused of stealing $40,000 in scholarship money (cleveland.com) 'Extremely delusional' North Olmsted youth pastor sentenced for sexual relationship with teen (cleveland.com) Two accused of causing crash while fleeing Eastlake police (photos) (cleveland.com) Berea man sentenced for rape of Soviet-era labor camp survivor (cleveland.com) Garfield Heights detectives arrest suspect in restaurant robberies (video) (cleveland.com) North Ridgeville abduction case may be linked to Elyria, Cleveland (WKYC Channel 3) Lorain County couple arrested in connection with alleged child abuse case (Lorain Morning Journal) Cleveland / Cuyahoga County Cleveland police's proposed use-of-force policy designed to address past issues (cleveland.com) Donald Trump proposes expanded 'school choice' during visit to Cleveland charter school (cleveland.com) No water in a hot Cleveland school? Depends who you ask (cleveland.com) Cleveland artist to live inside giant wooden sphere made from demolished houses (cleveland.com) 10 Cuyahoga County school districts have new taxes on the November ballot: Here's the list (cleveland.com) Local news East 20 Lake County restaurants, other food places with most health inspection violations (cleveland.com) Man worth millions says he needed food stamps (WKYC Channel 3) Vietnam Veterans Memorial traveling wall comes to Geauga County (News-Herald) Local news West Avon police sergeant admits having one beer before drunken-driving arrest (video) (cleveland.com) Florida man dies after crash on Ohio Turnpike (Lorain Morning Journal) Willard man struck, killed on Ohio 61 (Sandusky Register) Akron / Canton area Death of man at Brandywine Falls in Cuyahoga Valley National Park ruled suicide by medical examiner (cleveland.com) Akron awarded $5 million to reimagine civic spaces, bring diverse communities together (cleveland.com) State Donald Trump leads Hillary Clinton in latest Ohio poll (cleveland.com) Retired generals from Ohio stress their support for Hillary Clinton ahead of Donald Trump's Cleveland appearance (cleveland.com) Medical marijuana is now legal in Ohio but not much changes for patients (cleveland.com) Ohio lawmaker urges cities not to ban medical marijuana before state sets rules (cleveland.com)  Ohio mine workers seek pension relief on Capitol Hill (photos and video) (cleveland.com) How to build a highway: A tour of an Ohio Turnpike construction zone (cleveland.com)
1 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Greater Cleveland Lorain County Ohio Summit County Ohio Akron Ohio Ohio Lake County Ohio Elyria Ohio
Death of man at Brandywine Falls in Cuyahoga Valley National Park ruled suicide by medical examiner
The death of a man found at Brandywine Falls Tuesday has been ruled a suicide by the Summit County Medical Examiner's Office. Watch video AKRON, Ohio -- An elderly man found dead at Brandywine Falls Tuesday took his own life, according to the Summit County Medical Examiner's Office. The office identified the man as 71-year-old August C. Voight, of Brecksville. Voight died of multiple blunt force injuries, Gary Gunther, chief investigator with the medical examiner's office, said Thursday. Voight was found at the base of a cliff overlooking a 65-foot waterfall on the eastern edge of the Cuyahoga Valley National Park in Sagamore Hills. Previous coverage: Elderly man found dead at Brandywine Falls in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park Voight's death is the third in the area since the falls became part of the national park. In 1995, a man fell over the boardwalk fence and died. There wasn't another death there until May 2011 when a 31-year-old Canal Fulton man died after falling from the top of the falls.    If you wish to discuss or comment on this story, please visit our crime and courts comments section. Like Chanda Neely on Facebook. Follow me on Twitter: Follow @ChandaNeely // !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+'://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js';fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document, 'script', 'twitter-wjs'); // ]]>
45 points by The Plain Dealer | Ohio and Erie Canal Cuyahoga Valley National Park Summit County Ohio Akron Ohio Death Brecksville Ohio Cuyahoga County Ohio Life
Cleveland Beer Week director accused of stealing $40,000 in scholarship money
Christine Montague, 48, is accused of stealing more than $40,000 from Cleveland Beer Week's scholarship funds. Christine MontagueBedford City Jail  CLEVELAND, Ohio -- The program director of Cleveland Beer Week is accused of stealing $40,000 in charitable donations that the organization uses to fund scholarships. Christine Montague, 48, is charged with grand theft and forgery. She is scheduled for arraignment Sept. 21 in Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Court. Montague stole $44,849 from Cleveland Beer Week during a two-year span from January 2014 to the end of 2015, according to court records. Montague, who served as the program's director since 2009, siphoned funds donated to the organization for the Malone Foundation scholarship program, according to court records. She earned a $10,000 yearly salary to serve as the program's director and the public face of the event giving interviews to media outlets promoting the event. But instead of sending the payments to the scholarship fund, she paid herself, according to a Bedford Heights police investigation. Montague was arrested Aug. 8 and is free on a $25,000 surety bond. She did not immediately return a call seeking comment. John Lane, of the Winking Lizard, who is one of four operating board members for Cleveland Beer Week, said he couldn't elaborate on the charges or how the organization found out about the missing money. Bedford Heights police did not provide a copy of the police report on Thursday. "We absolutely can't do as much for the charity," Lane said. "We're trying to keep our momentum going forward and just move on." Another board member, Ed Thompkins of Heinen's, said the theft has not impacted this year's Beer Week, set for Oct. 14 through Oct. 22. "Basically, we're still going full steam ahead," Thompkins said. To comment on this story, please visit our crime and courts comments section.
394 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Scholarship Corporate governance Crime Fiduciary Board of directors Scholarships Bedford Ohio
'Extremely delusional' North Olmsted youth pastor sentenced for sexual relationship with teen
North Olmsted youth pastor Brian Mitchell, 31, was sentenced Thursday for carrying on a sexual relationship with a 16-year-old girl. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A North Olmsted youth pastor will spend a decade in prison for carrying on a sexual relationship with a 16-year-old member of his church. Brian Mitchell, 31, sat Thursday with his brow furrowed for most of the 90-minute hearing where Cuyahoga County Judge Patrick Corrigan sentenced him to 10 years in prison. Mitchell -- a husband and father of three children under the age of 8-- was the youth pastor at Columbia Road Baptist Church in North Olmsted when he met the victim. He pleaded guilty to four counts of sexual battery. "I'm so sorry to (the) family," Mitchell said. "I can't imagine the work and effort you've had to put into fixing your family." The girl in a letter to the judge that she looked up to Mitchell, and that she sought him out to learn how to live a more spiritual life through religion. Mitchell began sending her text messages that became more and more frequent. Someone brought it to the attention of church leaders and the texting stopped for a time. He started up again, and the girl said the tone of the messages quickly turned from innocent and fun to serious. She said he complained about his wife and their marital problems. She wrote that she wanted the texts to stop but felt scared to say anything because he was a powerful figure in the church and in her life. One day, he drove to her home and told her to come out to his car. He kissed her and told her he wanted to see her again. The next time he drove out to her home, he had sex with her in his car. Another time he had sex with her at her home while his wife was out of town, Assistant Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Kristen Karkutt said. "I did not give him permission," the girl wrote. "I clearly said 'no, didn't want to.' I felt like he tricked me." Mitchell directed her to delete text message exchanges between the two and told her never to tell anyone. He picked her up during her lunch break from school. He sent her flowers for her birthday, then asked her mother at church if she knew who sent them. Normally an outgoing teen who played sports and worked two jobs while going to school, she found herself unable to get out of bed. She struggled in school. Once the relationship came to light, the church reported the accusations to Fairview Park police. The girl's mother said in court that church officials told her their family couldn't return to the church until she apologized to Mitchell's wife. Defense attorney Ian Friedman said Mitchell was never aware of that. The family has since left the church. The girl wrote that she still has nightmares and displays what Corrigan called textbook symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. "This is a perfect example of the psychological damage caused by these types of crimes," Corrigan said. Friedman said Mitchell acknowledges that he betrayed the girl, her family, his own family and the church. "The whirlwind two or three months of Snapchats and texts and the secrecy involved created an adrenaline- and lust-filled situation where he felt like there could be a future," Friedman said.   Mitchell, who received about three-dozen letters of support given to the judge, apologized to the girl's family and said he was sorry for what he did, not that he got caught.  He said that he dreamed of being a father and asked for leniency in order to take care of his kids. Corrigan, who had the option to sentence him anywhere between one and 20 years in prison, did not adopt Friedman's recommendation for house arrest. "Your delusional excuse -- that there were emotions and love involved -- is troubling," Corrigan told Mitchell. "That's extremely delusional." To comment on this story, please visit our crime and courts comments section.
4572 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Text messaging North Olmsted Ohio Fairview Park Ohio SMS Marriage Olmsted Township Cuyahoga County Ohio Mother
Two accused of causing crash while fleeing Eastlake police (photos)
Two Cleveland residents are accused of causing a car crash during a short police chase Sunday in Euclid. Brandy TillettEastlake police  Joshua Bailey.jpgEastlake police  EASTLAKE, Ohio -- Two Cleveland residents are accused of causing a car crash following a short police chase Sunday in Eastlake. Officers tried to stop a 2006 Ford after learning the people inside were suspected of shoplifting at Walmart on Vine Street. The driver refused to stop and crashed into a van on Euclid Avenue, police said. The crash pushed the Ford into a street sign and several trees and caused it to overturn. Officers arrested a passenger in the car and arrested the driver hiding nearby, police said. The driver, Brandy Tillett, 32, of Cleveland, is charged with theft, receiving stolen property, failure to comply, reckless operation and driving without a valid license. Her passenger, Joshua Bailey, 32, of Cleveland, is charged with theft, receiving stolen property, resisting arrest and assaulting a police officer. Tillett and Bailey pleaded not guilty during their arraignments Tuesday in Willoughby Municipal Court. Both are scheduled to appeared at preliminary hearings Sept. 13, records show. A Walmart employee reported just after 8:45 p.m. that two people loaded a cart full of merchandise into their car and drove away. An Eastlake officer spotted the car turning onto SOM Center Road from Vine Street. The driver ignored the officer's order to stop and kept driving onto the Lakeland Freeway toward Interstate 90. The van hit the Ford's passenger side at Euclid Avenue, police said. The van's passengers were taken to Hillcrest Hospital for treatment of non-life-threatening injuries. At least one person in the van suffered a broken shoulder, court records show. Officers arrested Bailey in the overturned Ford. They found Tillett hiding in a recycling bin outside a house on East 267th Street, police said. Neither Bailey nor Tillett was injured. Investigators later learned the Ford had been reported stolen in Elyria, records show. To comment on this story, please visit our crime and courts comments section.
2 points by The Plain Dealer | Crime Arrest English-language films Resisting arrest Cuyahoga County Ohio Theft Greater Cleveland Cleveland
Free hot dog offered with a ticket to "Sausage Party"
Regal Cinemas is offering a voucher for a free hot dog to everyone who buys a ticket to "Sausage Party." CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Theatergoers have a chance to get free food the next time they see the summer's hit R-rated comedy "Sausage Party." In what is likely an attempt to boost lagging ticket sales, Regal Cinemas is offering a hot dog voucher to everyone who buys a ticket to see the raunchy farce about anthropomorphic foodstuffs between Friday and Sunday. Northeast Ohio has eight Regal Cinemas theaters located in Willoughby, Richmond Heights, Middleburg Heights, North Olmsted, Westlake, Medina, Hudson and Akron. Sausage Party has made more than $100 million at the box office so far -- against a modest $19 million budget -- but tickets sales have fallen off since its August 12 premiere. It brought in a pedestrian $5.2 million in ticket sales last weekend, finishing fifth behind "Don't Breathe," "Suicide Squad," "Kubo and the Two Strings," and "Pete's Dragon."
21 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Cities in Ohio Movie theater Greater Cleveland Box office Akron Ohio Brook Park Ohio Ticket
Berea man sentenced for rape of Soviet-era labor camp survivor
Jason Farmer, 30, was sentenced to 25 years in prison for breaking into an 81-year-old woman's apartment and raping her. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A Berea man will spend the next quarter-century in prison for the rape of an 81-year-old woman who survived a Soviet-era labor camp as a child. Jason Farmer, 30, stood and watched Thursday as the woman described the gruesome incident and how it has affected her in the twilight of her life, which included watching as a young child as Nazis kill her father and her time spent as a teenager in a Siberian labor camp.  Cuyahoga County Judge Deena Calabrese sentenced Farmer, who previously pleaded guilty to rape, kidnapping and aggravated burglary in the Feb. 11 attack. Farmer is now a Tier III sex offender, meaning he must report his address to the county sheriff every 90 days for the rest of his life once he's released from prison. "In all my years as a county prosecutor and now judge, this is one of the most brutal rapes I've ever seen," Calabrese said. The woman said during the hearing that she knew Farmer who often took walks around her neighborhood. She used to give him a $1 or $2 when he asked because she felt sorry for him. Farmer knocked on the woman's door at her Berea apartment. The woman opened the door, but refused to let him inside. He forced his way into the apartment, cutting the woman's forearm as she tried to slam the door shut. Farmer picked her up and threw her over his shoulder "like potatoes," the woman said. He carried her to her bedroom and raped her. The woman offered Farmer all her money to stop. He did, and took $7. Farmer then told the woman to not tell anyone about the incident. The woman said she was too scared to report the incident but eventually told a neighbor, who convinced her to go to the hospital. Berea police interviewed Farmer, who denied responsibility. DNA from the sexual-assault kit matched Farmer, whose DNA was in the national database because of three prior theft-related felony convictions. Police confronted him with the new evidence and he confessed. The woman said the rape left her unable to stay at her apartment and scared she'll be attacked again. She also said she's bewildered by the attacked. "I could be his great-grandmother," the woman said in broken English. "Why would you want to touch an old lady like that?" Calabrese replied: "No woman should be touched like that." The woman grew up in Slovenia until Nazis stormed into her home at about age 10, hit her father with the butt of a rifle, dragged him out of the home and shot him, according to St. Paul Lutheran Pastor Tom Henderson. He said she was given to a pig farmer, who also ran a bar. The man would allow his bar patrons to rape her in an attic above where the pigs were kept. She was then taken to a Siberian labor camp, and later to a camp in Bosnia, Henderson said. She ended up in the U.S. in 1952. She lived in the Broadway-Fleet neighborhood until gunfire became too regular for her taste. Despite being a poor widow, she moved to the apartment in Berea. "Berea was so beautiful," she said. "I could leave my windows open all the time and I didn't lock my doors sometimes. He would have to be not normal to do this." Farmer suffers from bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, defense attorney Patrick DiChiro said. Farmer's IQ is estimated at 72 and has a first-grade reading ability, DiChiro said.  "I didn't mean to cause that much harm," he said during the hearing. "I want to say I'm sorry."  To comment on this story, please visit our crime and courts comments section.
974 points by The Plain Dealer | Labor camp Cuyahoga County Ohio Felony Rape
Brecksville Dam demolition the focus of public hearing tonight in Peninsula (photos)
The public will receive its first look this evening at what the Cuyahoga River will look like after the Brecksville Dam is removed next year or the year after. PENINSULA, Ohio - The public will receive its first look this evening at what the Cuyahoga River will look like after the Brecksville Dam is removed next year or the year after. The open house will be from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Happy Days Lodge, 500 West Streetsboro Road (Ohio 303) just East of Peninsula. The presentation is sponsored by the Ohio EPA and the National Park Service. Conservationists and friends of the Cuyahoga River generally support the dam demolition plan and the environmental benefits the plan will bring to the water quality and wildlife habitat in the river. No organized opposition is expected. "We're excited," said Pam Barnes, a spokeswoman for the Cuyahoga Valley National Park. "This is really a good thing for the river." "This project is exactly what we need for the Cuyahoga," said Peter Bode, watershed coordinator for Cuyahoga River Restoration. "It is ridding a major barrier for our migratory species to spawn upriver ... and nothing but a positive for the ecology of the region." Any grumbling about the dam's removal likely will be limited to steelhead trout anglers who enjoy casting their lines into the base of the dam's spillway, where the game fish congregate, unable to proceed upstream. "That is the shooting-fish-in-a-barrel place to be," said Jane Goodman, Cuyahoga River Restoration's executive director. "But it's a small dam. Most people don't even know it's there. I don't expect anyone except the steelhead anglers to have any objections." The EPA and parks officials will present the results of an environmental assessment conducted on the eight-foot tall, 183-foot long dam which spans the river just north of the Station Road bridge trailhead along the Towpath Trail. The assessment identifies an ecological restoration strategy to improve water quality while preserving the Ohio and Erie Canal's cultural integrity as a National Historic Landmark. The EPA and national park officials have proposed completely removing the dam, thus restoring the river to its natural flow conditions. They plan to install a pump to supply as much as 13 million gallons of water a day to the adjacent canal. By removing the dam, state environmentalists would move a step closer to returning the Cuyahoga to a free-flowing river, leaving the 57-foot high Gorge Dam between Akron and Cuyahoga Falls as the only impediment from its source in Geauga County to its mouth at Lake Erie. Removing the Gorge Dam, however, could cost as much as $70 million.
73 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga River Ohio and Erie Canal Ohio Cuyahoga Valley National Park Lake Erie Greater Cleveland Cuyahoga County Ohio National Park Service
Greater Cleveland Volunteers: Opportunities for the week of September 7, 2016
September 18th - Party in the Parklands! Volunteer at an annual Shaker Lakes Hike and Run. 7:00-10:30 a.m. at the water station and 10:30-1:30 with arts/crafts, activities and food/beverage attendants. Contact Jan at 216-391-9500. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Greater Cleveland Volunteers enriches the community and individuals through volunteer services. We recruit individuals age 18 years+ to volunteer at over 100 nonprofit organizations throughout Cuyahoga County. We offer one-time, ongoing and short-term volunteer opportunities. Connect with us at greaterclevelandvolunteers.org, Facebook and Twitter @CLEvolunteers. We have volunteer coordinators available at 216-391-9500. Here are a few featured volunteer opportunities. Have an interest and don't see it? Call us and a volunteer coordinator will assist. One-time Event: Party in the Parklands! Volunteer at an annual Shaker Lakes Hike and Run on Sunday, September 18th. 7:00-10:30 a.m. at the water station and 10:30-1:30 with arts/crafts, activities and food/beverage attendants. Contact Jan at 216-391-9500 x 124 or [email protected] On-Going Literacy Tutoring: We have several partner agencies that seek before, during and after school tutoring needs. Tell us what school district is close and when you are available. 216-391-9500 [email protected] Hospice of the Western Reserve needs a volunteer to help out at its resale shop on Mayfield Road. A retail background would be great, but is not necessary.  The volunteer would be trained to run the cash register and  assist the full-time manager. An "employee" discount is given to all who volunteer in the shop.  Shop hours are Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and closed on Sundays. The shop sells furniture, household goods, jewelry, collectibles, some clothing, purses, etc. Call Sue at 216-391-9500 x 120 for more information Lunchtime Mentoring: If you have a lunch hour available once a week, during the school year, consider serving as a positive role model to a student in the 4th grade. Contact Carol at 216-391-9500 x 125 or [email protected] Theatre Usher: The Maltz Performing Arts Center (MPAC) in University Circle is a wonderful new venue for music, lectures and cultural enrichment in Cleveland. If you have an interest in adding this to your volunteer efforts contact Cecille at 216-391-9500 x 122 or [email protected] Senior Living Facility: Assist transporting resident to/from their outings. Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays 10:30 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Training and supervision is provided. Contact Lynette at 216-391-9500 x 123 or [email protected]
2 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Greater Cleveland Cleveland Week-day names Cuyahoga River Connecticut Western Reserve Lunch High school
10 Cuyahoga County school districts have new taxes on the November ballot: Here's the list
Four districts want more money for expenses. Another two want the OK to sell bonds that would raise money for school construction and renovation. The remaining four propose combination issues that would allow a district to sell bonds and levy a tax to pay for them while also allowing an additional tax for maintenance and further improvements.
13 points by The Plain Dealer | High school Tax Middle school Levy Taxation in the United States Finance Cuyahoga County Ohio College
9-11 memorial service planned for Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument
A ceremony of remembrance of those who lost their lives in the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and an open house for first responders and their families will be held Sunday at the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument on Public Square. CLEVELAND, Ohio - A memorial service to mark the 15th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks will be held Sunday, 11:30 a.m., at the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument on Public Square. The event will open with a welcome by Tim Daley, monument executive director, and remarks by Ted Prasse, monument commission president. An invocation will be offered by Rev. Gloria Chaney, Cleveland Police chaplain and associate minister of the Olivet Institutional Baptist Church. A presentation of wreaths will be made in honor of those who lost their lives as a result of the attacks in New York City, Washington, D.C., and Somerset County, Pennsylvania. Following the service a special community open house will be held for first responders and their families from noon to 6 p.m. as a way of thanks for their continuing efforts to serve and protect the community. Light refreshments will be served. The monument, dedicated in 1894, honors the Union soldiers and sailors of Cuyahoga County who served in the Civil War.
7 points by The Plain Dealer | American Civil War New Jersey New York City Ohio Democratic Party Cuyahoga County Ohio September 11 New York
Country LIving Fair in Columbus and migrating monarchs: Home and Garden News
Country LIving Fair in Columbus and migrating monarchs: Home and Garden News. Fair-goers line up for down-home tastes during the Country Living Fair, coming to Columbus in September. The fair brings the magazine's pages to life with booths filled with vintage items, antiques, handmade crafts and great music. Country Living Magazine  COUNTRY LIVING FAIR: The pages of Country Living magazine come to life during the Country Living Fair, returning to Columbus Friday through Sunday, Sept. 16-18. Special guests and Country Living editors will demonstrate how to make delicious recipes and fun crafts, and talk about beekeeping, creating a personalizes space, gardening and more. The fair offers antiques sellers, furniture makers and crafters, as well as book signings, cooking, crafting, and DIY demonstrations. Madcap Cottage founders Jason Oliver Nixon and John Loecke will talk about how they designed their Catskills home and how to use color and pattern to create a personalized space at 2 p.m. Friday. Nancy Fuller from the Food Network will lead a guided shopping trip through the fair on Saturday, Sept. 17 at 2 p.m. You'll find the complete schedule here. Country Living Fair is 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday through Sunday, Sept. 16-18. Gates open for Early Bird ticket holders at 8:30 a.m. Friday and Saturday. Ohio Village is located at 800 E. 17th Ave., Columbus. One-day admission is $13 in advance and $16 at the door; three-day weekend passes are available for $15 in advance and $20 at the door. An Early Bird three-day weekend pass, $40, lets you enter at 8:30 a.m. on Friday and Saturday. Admission is free for children ages 16 and under. MILKWEED FOR MONARCHS: This fall, you can collect milkweed seed pods to help the Cuyahoga Soil & Water Conservation District's effort to expand the habitat for monarch butterflies throughout Ohio. The Ohio Pollinator Habitat Initiative - a partnership of the Ohio Division of Wildlife and other organizations -- will process the seed pods and establish new plantings of milkweed. During these times the Monarch breeds and lays their eggs on milkweed plants. Milkweed is the only plant that Monarch caterpillars will feed and lay their eggs on. The Ohio Pollinator Habitat Initiative works to educate the public and trying to gain more awareness of the milkweed decline, according to a press release from the conservation district. If you would like to join in this effort, harvest milkweed pods that are dry and gray or brown in color. The pod's seam should pop easily under your thumb. Store pods in a paper bag, placed in a dry, cool place. Mark your bags with the county they were picked in, and the date and time when they were collected. Collected seed pods from Common Milkweed can be dropped off at the Cuyahoga Soil & Water Conservation District's office from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays, or left in the collection bin outside the office after those hours. The office is located at 6100 West Canal Road, Valley View. The collection drive continues through Sunday, Oct. 30. Click here for more information. MONARCH MIGRATION: Monarch butterflies are beginning their amazing migration, and their path leads them over Northeast Ohio on the way to their wintering grounds in Mexico. Tag and release monarchs as part of the Monarch Watch program during a session titled Monarch Migration, 2 to 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10 at the Brecksville Nature Center in the Cleveland Metroparks. The session is free and advance registration is not required. Expect to walk about 1 1/2 miles in prairies and meadows. The nature center is located at 9000 Chippewa Creek Dr., Brecksviille.
1 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga Valley National Park Greater Cleveland Cuyahoga County Ohio Columbus Ohio Ohio Saturday Cleveland Metroparks Illinois
Man shot dead in Cleveland was threatening people at two gas stations, police say
Maurice Hough, 21, was fatally shot in Cleveland's Forest Hills neighborhood less than two hours after threatening people at two gas stations. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A man shot dead in Cleveland's Forest Hills neighborhood threatened people at two nearby gas stations shortly before he was killed, according to police reports. Maurice Hough, 21, was found dead of a gunshot wound in his stomach Aug. 27 in the backyard of a home in the 600 block of East 123rd Street, according to the Cuyahoga County Medical Examiner. The medical examiner ruled his death a homicide. No arrests have been made. The threats started about 10:30 p.m. Aug. 26 when Hough went to the Quick-N-Easy convenience store in the 12300 block of St. Clair Avenue, police said. Store owner Samih Mustafa told police that he knew Hough since he was a kid. Mustafa said it seemed like Hough was intoxicated and agitated. Hough grabbed two coffee empty cups off a coffee machine and went to take them. Mustafa said he regularly takes the cups, even though he's not allowed.  Mustafa told Hough to put the cups back and locked the doors so Hough wasn't able to leave the store, according to police reports.  Hough yelled profanities and told Mustafa that he was going "bring my .357," police reports say. A friend opened the door from the outside and Hough left. He returned a short time later and told Mustafa "I'm gonna kill you," police reports say. "I know what time you leave." He left the store and Mustafa called 911. Hough went to another gas station, the Gas USA, a few blocks away about 45 minutes later. An off-duty Cleveland detective working security at Gas USA reported Hough was threatening people outside the gas station, including workers who were trying to fix a gas leak after a car hit one of the pumps. The off-duty officer noted that Hough had a gun with him. Hough left the gas station and walked down East 123rd Street. Samuel Cunningham said that he was sitting outside when Hough, who is known in the neighborhood as "Cookie Face" because of his freckles, told him to go back in his house because something bad was going to happen. Cunningham said that Hough had a gun and was alone. Cunningham went inside his house. He said he heard several gunshots a few minutes later. On-duty officers driving to Gas USA reported hearing three gunshots. The off-duty officer reported hearing three to four gunshots about four houses north of the gas station. Police searched the area and eventually found Hough about 12:05 a.m. Aug. 27 behind an abandoned home on his back with a gunshot wound to his lower right stomach. The back part of the home is littered with alcohol bottles and beer cans. Neighbors said people regularly go behind the house to drink. Hough was unconscious and not breathing when police found him, police reports say. He was pronounced dead at the scene.  If you wish to discuss or comment on this story, please visit our crime and courts comments section.
252 points by The Plain Dealer | Convenience store Filling station 7-Eleven Coffee Fuel dispenser St. Clair Avenue Natural gas Cuyahoga County Ohio
Strongsville takes up medical marijuana issue
Strongsville fell in line with the three other Ohio 82 cities in Cuyahoga County on Tuesday night and established a moratorium on medical marijuana. STRONGSVILLE, Ohio - On Tuesday night, Strongsville fell in line with three other Ohio 82 cities in Cuyahoga County and established a moratorium on medical marijuana. The moratorium, which City Council approved, will prohibit the growing, processing and selling of marijuana for six months. New Ohio legislation allows patients, starting this week, to use medical marijuana prescribed by doctors, but the state has not nailed down the law's details. "The moratorium gives us the ability to see what the state is going to do and decide if the city needs to introduce its own zoning legislation," Law Director Neal Jamison said Tuesday night. Last week, Broadview Heights City Council voted unanimously to establish a 12-month moratorium on medical marijuana. Brecksville and North Royalton city councils were expected to approve six-month medical marijuana moratoriums, and may have done so Tuesday night. Broadview Heights establishes one-year moratorium on medical marijuana Several other Cuyahoga County communities, including Lakewood, and municipalities throughout Ohio, including Beavercreek, Troy and Piqua, have also approved medical marijuana moratoriums. Rocky River has introduced legislation that would ban the growing, processing and selling of medical marijuana. The new state law - House Bill 523, which Gov. John Kasich signed in June - already provides some restrictions on medical marijuana. For example, no one can grow, process or sell marijuana within 500 feet of a school, church, library, playground or park. Also, no one is allowed to grown marijuana in their homes. HB 523 authorizes municipal governments to establish their own medical marijuana regulations. Local governments can restrict locations where marijuana is cultivated, processed or sold, or they can ban the growing and selling of marijuana altogether. However, municipalities can't stop patients from using medical marijuana. Strongsville Councilman Joe DeMio said council hasn't yet decided whether the city should ban the growing and selling of medical marijuana here. He said such a debate is premature. But DeMio did express concern that HB 523 might contradict federal law, which still lists marijuana as an illegal drug. He asked Jamison to prepare a memo on the state versus federal laws. This story has been updated. 
120 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio North Royalton Ohio Broadview Heights Ohio Municipality Parma Ohio United States Congress United States Local government in the United States
Infant abducted, left in church; suspect jumps deputy; ITT Tech closes campuses: Overnight News Links
Also, Cuyahoga County hindered by $1 billion in debt, report says; Mentor psychic deceived clients out of $1.5 million in cash, jewelry and cars, records say; Strongsville takes up medical marijuana issue Featured stories Infant abducted, left in Akron church (WEWS Channel 5) Suspect jumps deputy, tries twice to steal cruiser (Sandusky Register) ITT Tech closes, including campuses in Warrensville Heights, Strongsville and Akron (cleveland.com) Crime Mentor psychic deceived clients out of $1.5 million in cash, jewelry and cars, records say (cleveland.com) Akron police officer cited for OVI (WEWS Channel 5) Boy found shaking as parents overdosed on heroin in Cleveland park, police say (WJW Channel 8) Man accused of looking up students' skirts at Hathaway Brown School (WJW Channel 8) Amherst Township man gets five years for firefighter hostage situation (Lorain Morning Journal) Euclid man gets probation for egging onslaught on his former neighbor's house (cleveland.com) Dozens of headstones vandalized at historic Cleveland cemetery (cleveland.com) Man shot dead in Cleveland was threatening people at two gas stations, police say (cleveland.com)  Parma man guilty of sex trafficking of child, paying 14-year-old for sex (cleveland.com) Accused gunman fired 27 shots into North Ridgeville home, striking teen in ongoing dispute (cleveland.com) Cleveland man charged in St. Rocco's Fest carjacking, mother's fatal crash appears in court (cleveland.com) Drug agents seize more than 70 kilos of cocaine in Cleveland bust (cleveland.com) Berea family finds drunken stranger asleep in their home (cleveland.com) Sexual predator accused of being part of Cleveland smash-and-grab ring (cleveland.com) Police ask for public's help in finding suspect in Canton double homicide (WEWS Channel 5) District says Brookside High transgender students can use any bathroom (WEWS Channel 5) Cleveland / Cuyahoga County Cuyahoga County hindered by $1 billion in debt, report says (cleveland.com) Local news East Ohio 44 North ramp to Ohio 2 West to close (cleveland.com) Water main break closes Richmond Heights Elementary Wednesday (WKYC Channel 3) Bus driver leaves students unattended in Euclid (WEWS Channel 5) School in Euclid dismisses early because of temperatures (WJW Channel 8) Local news West Strongsville takes up medical marijuana issue (cleveland.com) Oberlin College president to step down in 2017 (Lorain Morning Journal) No charges in hot air balloon incident (Sandusky Register) Akron / Canton area Four injured, including child, in Akron highway crash (cleveland.com) Medical examiner called to scene after person fell at Brandywine Falls in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park (cleveland.com) Fire crews evacuate Akron business after 'hazardous materials release' (cleveland.com) Akron Zoo hosts job fair for Boo at the Zoo, Wild Lights (cleveland.com) Ohio Federal judge erred in last-minute order to keep Cincinnati polling places open in March primary, appeals court says (cleveland.com) Ohio's endangered species: Black bear, rattlesnake, hellbender and more (cleveland.com) State says releasing autopsies in Pike County killings threatens case (cleveland.com) National Democrats pull another $3 million from Ohio's U.S. Senate race (cleveland.com)
-1 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Greater Cleveland Lorain County Ohio Ohio Akron Ohio Cuyahoga River Cities in Ohio Cleveland
Millionaire collected food stamps, prosecutor says; proposal would make abortion murder; officer's neck broken by teens: Overnight News Links
Also, shooting in parking lot of Cleveland police station wounds 1; Tamir Rice 911 call taker disciplined for 'rude, unprofessional' behavior in recent incident; Northeast Ohio schools closed Thursday due to heat Watch video Featured stories Raid targets Geauga County millionaire on food stamps (WKYC Channel 3) Proposal would brand abortion as aggravated murder in Ohio (cleveland.com) Corrections officer's neck broken during teens' breakout (Canton Repository) Crime Shooting in parking lot of Cleveland police station wounds 1 (cleveland.com) Cuyahoga County Jail sergeant disciplined in excessive force case (cleveland.com) Avon police officer on leave after drunken-driving arrest (cleveland.com) Cleveland woman accused of forcing homeless woman into prostitution (cleveland.com) One injured in afternoon shooting near University of Akron (cleveland.com) Cleveland Heights police officer accused of holding gun to his wife's back during domestic dispute (audio) (cleveland.com) Cuyahoga Falls man gets five years in prison for shaking infant (cleveland.com) Cleveland hip-hop artist on house arrest taken into custody after someone shot up his house (cleveland.com) Death penalty trial begins for man charged in Warrensville Heights barbershop slayings (cleveland.com) Felon tied to Cleveland smash-and-grab ring (cleveland.com) Three teens charged in separate robberies in Cleveland Heights (cleveland.com) Detroit-area trucking company owner sentenced to nine years for dealing club drugs (cleveland.com) Two charged after Cleveland federal agents seize more than 200 pounds of cocaine (cleveland.com) Four shot in three hours in Cleveland, including teen (cleveland.com) FBI expands search for man they believe abducted one girl, tried to snatch another (WEWS Channel 5) Sheffield Township man arrested after Lorain shooting (Lorain Morning Journal) Cleveland / Cuyahoga County Tamir Rice 911 call taker disciplined for 'rude, unprofessional' behavior in recent incident (cleveland.com) Northeast Ohio schools closed Thursday due to heat (cleveland.com) How hot is too hot for school when there's no air conditioning? (cleveland.com) Donald Trump to appear at Cleveland charter school Thursday (cleveland.com) Monument company to review vandalism damage at historic Cleveland cemetery (cleveland.com) Cleveland paints over accidental bike lane on Ontario (cleveland.com) Jack Cleveland Casino revenue rebounds in August (cleveland.com) More RTA service cuts go into effect Sunday (cleveland.com) Local news East John Carroll University closes 2 dorms because of power outage (cleveland.com) Local news West Elderly man found dead at Brandywine Falls in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park (cleveland.com) Akron / Canton area Newly merged Cleveland Clinic Akron General names president (cleveland.com) State Sen. Rob Portman launches investigation into EpiPen pricing (cleveland.com) The most famous person from each county in Ohio (cleveland.com)
2 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Greater Cleveland Akron Ohio Ohio Cleveland Summit County Ohio Cuyahoga River Cuyahoga Valley National Park
Cuyahoga County Jail sergeant disciplined in excessive force case
Cuyahoga County Sheriff's Department corrections sergeant was removed from a special assignment after he admitted he did not review surveillance footage of two uses of force that resulted in the firing of corrections Cpl. Brendan Johnson. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A Cuyahoga County Jail sergeant was disciplined after he failed to review jail surveillance video that showed an officer under his command pepper spraying two female inmates. Corrections Sgt. Mark Thevenin, a 22-year veteran, was written up and removed from the county's special response team after his bosses found that he willfully violated department policy and failed to review the video of the May incidents, according to disciplinary records provided by the Cuyahoga County Sheriff's Department. Cpl. Brendan Johnson was fired in July after the department found that he used excessive force against the two inmates on May 8 and May 10. Thevenin knew about the incidents the day they happened, which under department policy should have triggered him to review surveillance footage of the incident. He did not review it, or submit his own report detailing the investigation. In a written statement given to his bosses in response to the internal charges, his union attorney wrote that Thevenin "did not purposefully not review the footage." Rather, that shift was busy and the footage had not been downloaded, the attorney wrote. Thevenin also said that he found no reason to review the footage based on Johnson's explanation of the incidents, the statement says. The first incident happened May 8 when Johnson sprayed a woman in the face without warning after she refused to talk to him, according to a disciplinary letter. Two days later, Johnson kicked an inmate's legs out from beneath her and knocked her to the ground while she undressed, records say. He pepper sprayed her in the face despite the fact that she posed no threat, according to the the letter. Previous: Jail supervisor fired for excessive force Johnson was suspended for three days in August after he dragged an inmate across a room without giving him a verbal order. That incident is now the subject of a federal lawsuit against Johnson and the department. A month after that incident, Thevenin gave Johnson a glowing review. Thevenin suggested that Johnson should take a promotional exam to become a sergeant and "take more of a role in working with the junior Corporals." Thevenin was hired as a corrections officer in July 1994. After some minor attendance issues early in his career, Thevenin's supervisors gave him high remarks in his reviews. He was promoted to corporal in 2010, and sergeant in 2012.   If you'd like to comment on this story, visit our crime and courts comments section.
11 points by The Plain Dealer | Sergeant Corporal Non-commissioned officer Police Cuyahoga County Ohio Face Writing Incident
Detroit-area trucking company owner sentenced to nine years for dealing club drugs
A Detroit-area trucking company owner was sentenced Wednesday to nine years in prison for leading an operation that included two Rocky River sisters and brought large amounts of club drugs to the Cleveland area. Rinald TurhaniFBI  CLEVELAND, Ohio -- The owner of a Detroit-area trucking company was sentenced Wednesday to nine years in prison for leading an operation along with two Rocky River sisters that brought large amounts of club drugs to the Cleveland area. Rinald Turhani, 37, used his trucks to bring MDMA and marijuana from Canada to Ohio. He pleaded guilty in June to a conspiracy charge. U.S. District Judge Dan Polster said Turhani would have to be punished for "selling a great deal of poison into the community." Under a deal Turhani reached with prosecutors, Turhani could have faced more than 11 years in prison, but Polster said he felt nine years was sufficient. Turhani was arrested in March along his mistress Denisa Alicka, her sister Jonida Alicka and truck driver Leka Konini. All have pleaded guilty. Ian Friedman, Turhani's attorney, worked hard Wednesday to present Turhani as a family man who, despite letting his family down, was still a good father and husband. Turhani's loved ones sat in the viewing area. Ilva Turhani, Rinald's wife, said her husband has apologized to her every day. And Rinald Turhani said his actions were because he got addicted to drugs. "I promise you this is the first time and the last time I do wrong in my life," Turhani told Polster. Assistant U.S. Attorney Robert Corts questioned how good of a family man Turhani was "when he was out dealing drugs with his paramour." He noted that Turhani was arrested in California in December with nearly 20 pounds of MDMA, yet was let go after the Cleveland FBI wanted to continue its investigation. Even though many would take that as a warning, Turhani continued to deal with drugs, Corts said. Prosecutors said some of the drugs were dealt out of the Rocky River apartment complex where Denisa Alicka lived. She and Jonida Alicka, a former Linndale police officer, routinely traveled from New York and Michigan with drugs, according to court records. Prosecutors have described the two as having a lavish lifestyle, complete with plastic surgery, luxury cars and trips to Miami. The FBI also said Turhani could be a violent man. An agent testified in March that Turhani punched the dealer who owed him drugs in the face so hard that a tooth went through his lip. More: Judge cites 'unexplained wealth' in detaining Rocky River sisters accused of dealing club drugs If you would like to comment on this story, please visit Wednesday's crime and courts comment section.
-1 points by The Plain Dealer | Federal Bureau of Investigation English-language films United States Department of Justice Court Cuyahoga County Ohio Judge Family Greater Cleveland
Three teens charged in separate robberies in Cleveland Heights
Three teenagers are facing juvenile charges in a pair of robberies that happened in Cleveland Heights. CLEVELAND HEIGHTS, Ohio - Three teenagers face juvenile charges in a pair of robberies that happened in Cleveland Heights. The incidents happened within a three-hour period Saturday but do not appear to be related, police said. Two 17-year-old boys are accused of attacking a 19-year-old man just before 4 p.m. outside Gas USA on Noble Road near Monticello Boulevard, according to a police report. The victim had just left the gas station when the teens pushed him into a parked car and began hitting him. They stole a pack of cigarillos and other items before leaving in a black Oldsmobile Alero, the report says. The victim, who had several cuts and bruises on his face, identified two of the attackers as the 17-year-old boys. Detectives are still working to identify the third attacker. Police filed robbery charges against the 17-year-old boys in Cuyahoga County Juvenile Court. A 15-year-old boy is also accused of stealing a 12-year-old boy's bicycle shortly before 8 p.m. near the Noble Elementary School playground, according to a police report. The victim said several boys threw him off his Huffy bicycle and began hitting and kicking him. The victim was not hurt but was distraught when officers arrived, the report says. Officers found the 15-year-old boy at the playground. He first denied being involved in the attack and provided a fake identity to the officers. The boy then tried to run, but officers caught him near the intersection of Noble and Montevista roads, the report says. The 15-year-old boy is charged with robbery and obstructing officials business in Cuyahoga County Juvenile Court. Detectives are working to identify the other teens involved in the robbery.
32 points by The Plain Dealer | Attack Crime Cuyahoga County Ohio Cleveland Oldsmobile Alero Oldsmobile Theft Cleveland Heights Ohio
Cleveland Browns 2016: A football fan party guide (photos)
Never say die: Cleveland Browns fans are prepared for 2016. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Expectations haven't been so low nor has optimism been so high. This, you see, this just another Cleveland Browns season, which opens at 1 p.m. Sunday when the Browns travel to Philadelphia to meet the Eagles. (1 p.m.; WOIO Ch. 19). Yes, the fans will watch the games and no doubt tailgate - after all, it's the latter that helps you get through the former. But Browns fans are taking a sober approach to the season, if not the beer cooler. "It's going to be a rough year, but I'm still going to be the Browns No. 1 cheerleader," says superfan Gus Angelone. "Because, finally, they're building something for the future." You might know this 40-year-old forklift driver from Parma by his big orange head. You mean, Pumpkinhead - the leader of the Pumpkin Patch Browns Backers? A season ticket holder for 14 years, he's cheered on the Browns through good times and bad. And while he doesn't expect many wins this season, he will host a tail-gate party for all Browns home games at Barley House -- 1261 West Sixth Street, Cleveland; 216-623-1700; barleyhousecleveland.com. Pumpkinhead will pull his customized Pumpkinmobile up to the bash and lead the party, join in with some brewskis and give away T-shirts, Even demolish a car. "We're smashing up a car when the Patriots come to town," says Angelone, who will be joined at the tailgates by sports talkers from WKRK FM/92.3, which will broadcast from the event. "We'll decorate it with some Belichick stickers and deflated balls and give fans sledgehammers and let 'em go at it." At home for away games Lest you think the party will only go down when the team is at home, a number of spots will hosting away-game viewing parties. Are you ready to party with The Bone Lady? Yes, that one - the one in the orange skirt and top, buttons, bones, long white gloves and a funky beehive that looks like a cross between Carmen Miranda and the B-52s, The Browns superfan will host a couple of shindigs this Sunday to mark the opening of the season: Noon to 2 p.m., at the Winking Lizard Tavern Bedford Heights, 25380 Miles Road; 216-831-3488; winkinglizard.com/locations/bedford-heights; and 2-4 p.m., at the Jack Thistledown Racino, 21501 Emery Road, North Randall; 216-662-8600; jackentertainment.com/thistledown. "It's obvious they're starting all over again and rebuilding - and they won't be winning many games," says Darnall, an artist whose zany get-up was inspired by movie director John Water as the Browns. "But finally they're rebuilding the right way." The Bone Lady will host a tailgate bash for the home opener - 1 p.m. Sept 18 vs. the Baltimore Ravens - at the Winking Lizard in the Galleria at Erieview, 1301 East Ninth Street, Cleveland; 216-297-4490; winkinglizard.com/locations/galleria. For more on The Bone Lady, go to facebook.com/bone.lady.5/. Bernie, Bernie The Hard Rock Rocksino at Northfield Park is more than a party pad for Browns fans. It's home to a high-end shrine to the team's beloved quarterback, Bernie Kosar. The casino -- 10705 Northfield Road, Northfield - is home to Kosar's Wood Fired Grill. The restaurant-bar is akin to a fine-dining spot you might find in Las Vegas, from the wide-ranging drink list to a menu that focuses on steaks but is eclectic throughout. ("The 19" headlines the steak options, but seafood entrees such as Shrimp and Salmon Duo stand up to any offerings in high-end seafood restaurants.) The vibe is homey and the decor is hometown - a collection of Browns memorabilia from Kosar's heyday with the team. Kosar's will be doing Browns viewing parties, as will the casino's Club Velvet - which will host pregame brunches. For more info, go to hrrocksinonorthfieldpark.com or call 330-908-7625. Bring on the games Here are a number of spots that host Browns viewing parties, brunches, lunches and drink specials when the team is at home and away: Around the Corner, 18616 Detroit Ave.; Lakewood, 216-521-4413; atccafe.com: This ol' dame has been hosting Browns parties since, well, anyone remember when Mike Phipps was QB? The vibes are happy-go-lucky and brunch (9:30 a.m.) is a popular stop before  the game. Corner Alley, 402 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, 216-298-4070; thecorneralley.com: Whoa, it's the like the United Nations of Sports Bars. The main room will no doubt have the Browns game playing, but the bowling alley and side rooms televise a variety of other games - which has made it the go-to spot for transplants looking to follow their home teams. Gillespie's Map Room, 1281 West Ninth St., Cleveland, 216-621-7747; maproomcleveland.com: This spot has the vibe of a bar in some previous time, like when the Kardiac Kids played. Bonus: The joint is a five-minute walk to the stadium. So you won't need directions to the game, even if you're loaded. Magnolia, 1167 Front Avenue, Cleveland, 216-282-6970; facebook.com/Magnolia-Cleveland-1131876270169032: The just-opened donut shop in the Flats East Bank project is also a "secret speakeasy" and night club in the back. Alas, it will also double as a hang out on Sundays, when it hosts Browns parties. Maple Grove Tavern, 14832 Pease Road, Maple Heights, 216-475-4224: The tailgate continues even when the team is on the road. That's how it's been since the Browns returned at this comfy, casual spot that always feels like a home game. Action often starts around tailgating time and runs through the fifth, sixth and sometimes seventh quarter. Good vibes. Nuevo Modern Mexican, 1000 East Ninth Street, Cleveland, 216-737-1000; cleveland.nuevomodmex.com: This just-opened spot serves up Mexican-American fare, margaritas and tequila - not to mention stellar views of North Coast Harbor and Voinovich Park. Bow wowwow, it will also host Browns parties before games, complete with a Sunday brunch. Old Angle Tavern, 848 West 25th St., Cleveland, 216-861-5643; facebook.com/The-Old-Angle-Tavern-120991484581558: While it's regarded as another kind of football bar -- where the game is played with a round ball -- it's homey but lively place to watch NFL action. Nauti Mermaid, 1378 West Sixth St., 216-771-6175; thenautimermaid.com:  This Warehouse District institution serves a brunch for all seasons, one that features traditional offering to go with unique takes on seafood. It's usually jammed on Browns games - regardless whether it's a home or away game. It opens at 9 a.m. for home games; 10 a.m. for away. Velvet Dog, 1280 West Sixth St.; 216-664-1116; velvetdogcleveland.com. Yes, there's the rah-rah vibe, cheerleaders and beer at this Warehouse District spot, which will host pre- and post-game parties throughout the year. But soak up the rooftop patio while the weather is good. VSP Lounge (aka Skeets' VSP Lounge and Restaurant), 3551 East 93rd St., Cleveland, 216-441-2904: This happy-go-lucky East Side bar-eatery is the spot where the dawgs bark the loudest. Yes, the fans are boisterous. It's also a favored spot for Steelers fans.
41 points by The Plain Dealer | Cleveland Browns Cuyahoga County Ohio Bernie Kosar Game Gary Danielson Road Home Denver Broncos
Snapchat, Facebook Live coverage of Stipe Miocic's UFC workout: Follow along Wednesday
Add cleveland.com on Snapchat and Facebook for coverage from Stipe Miocic's workout Wednesday. CLEVELAND, Ohio - In a few days, Euclid native Stipe Miocic will try to defend his UFC Heavyweight Championship against veteran Alistair Overeem. Follow cleveland.com on social media Wednesday as Miocic prepares. UFC 203 takes place at The Q on Saturday and represents the first official UFC event to be held in Northeast Ohio. Both Miocic and Overeem are in Cleveland to prepare for their showdown. The heavyweights have open workouts Wednesday afternoon. Social media coordinator Hayden Grove will cover Miocic's workout on Facebook Live and Snapchat around 3 p.m. Here's how you can follow along: Add cleveland.com on Snapchat. Our username is clevelanddotcom Follow cleveland.com on Facebook here. For more information on UFC 203, check this out. Tickets to the fight are still available.
1 points by The Plain Dealer | Ultimate Fighting Championship Greater Cleveland Alistair Overeem Cleveland State University Akron Ohio Cleveland Ohio Cuyahoga County Ohio
Cleveland man arrested in deadly shooting of man found in Kamm's Corners neighborhood
A 38-year-old man was arrested Friday in connection with the fatal shooting of Joseph Timko, 35, of Cleveland. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A 38-year-old man was arrested Friday in connection with the fatal shooting of a man found dead outside a car in the city's Kamm's Corners neighborhood, police reports say. The Cleveland man was arrested on suspicion of aggravated murder and obstructing justice, according to city jail records and police reports. He is being held in the jail until prosecutors determine what charges to file against him. The man has not yet been formally charged, and Cleveland.com does not generally name uncharged suspects in crimes. Joseph Timko, 35, of Cleveland, was killed in the shooting, according to police reports and the Cuyahoga County Medical Examiner. The shooting happened about 1 a.m. Friday at a home in the 7200 block of Lawn Avenue, just south of Madison Avenue in the city's Detroit-Shoreway neighborhood, police said. Timko wasn't found until about 20 minutes later. His girlfriend called 911 and told police they were outside a white 1997 Chevrolet Lumina in front of Timko's home in the 4100 block of Rocky River Drive, in Kamm's Corners. Timko was on the ground with a gunshot wound to his neck. He was unconscious with blood coming from his mouth and nose, police reports say. The woman gave CPR to Timko until an ambulance arrived. Cleveland EMS workers gave him medical treatment and took him to Fairview Hospital, where he died, police reports say. Police have not said what led up to the shooting.  To comment on this story, please visit our crime and courts comments page.
-1 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Crime Criminal law Murder Assault Chevrolet Chevrolet Lumina Emergency medical services
Indictment accuses guard of smuggling heroin into Cuyahoga County Jail
The Cuyahoga County Jail guard charged with smuggling heroin into the downtown jail for an accused rapist has been indicted. Kamara AustinCuyahoga County Jail  CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A Cuyahoga County Jail guard was indicted Thursday on charges that accuse him of smuggling heroin into the jail for an accused rapist. Kamara Austin, 43, is charged with drug trafficking, drug possession and possessing criminal tools, according to court records. He is scheduled to appear at an arraignment Tuesday in Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Court. Austin is being held on $250,000 bond at the county jail. Austin smuggled 16 grams of heroin and 32 unidentified yellow pills into the jail for Anthony Lett, who is accused of raping a woman during a home invasion and stealing guns from the Berea gun show, according to court records. Federal agents arrested Austin on Wednesday in a parking lot on East 131st Street near Miles Avenue in Cleveland. Investigators found the heroin and pills with him. They also seized Austin's cellphone, court records show. Austin was hired as a corrections officer at the jail in 1998. He was placed on unpaid leave after his arrest. Lett, 40, is jailed on $250,000 bond in connection with an April 24, 2016 home invasion and rape in Cleveland. He has pleaded not guilty to attempted murder, rape and other charges in that case. To comment on this story, please visit Thursday's crime and courts comments page.
-1 points by The Plain Dealer | Crimes Criminal law Rape Cuyahoga County Ohio Illegal drug trade Crime Penology Prison
Perceptions of Cleveland continue to rise; Destination Cleveland sets goal of 20 million visitors by 2020
At Destination Cleveland's annual meeting Thursday, Gilbert announced an ambitious new goal for the organization: 20 million annual visitors by 2020, which would amount an increase of 14 percent over the next four years. Watch video CLEVELAND, Ohio - How can Cleveland top a year like 2016? The head of the region's tourism agency says it can't -- instead, city boosters need to build on the year's success. "We have to work our tails off to sustain that momentum," said David Gilbert, president and CEO of Destination Cleveland. "It's not about working for the next big thing." Instead, he said, it's about working toward many smaller things: more meetings and conventions, more leisure travelers and an overall better visitor experience. At Destination Cleveland's annual meeting Thursday, Gilbert announced an ambitious new goal for the organization: 20 million annual visitors by 2020, which would amount an increase of 14 percent over the next four years. "We talk about this notion of being an 'It' city," said Gilbert, a place with a reputation like Austin or Nashville. "That's what we aspire to." The agency released some data on visitor perceptions of the city that made the goal seem possible: * 38 percent of potential visitors from nearby states said they would definitely or probably consider a leisure trip to Cleveland, up from 33 percent a year ago. The recent figure puts Cleveland on par with Columbus and Pittsburgh, two cities that in recent years have fared much better than Cleveland in perception surveys. * National meeting planners, too, have improved their impressions of the city. In 2012, Cleveland was included on a list of cities that planners would "hardly consider" as a meeting host, due to concerns about cleanliness, safety and a lack of hotel rooms. In 2015, the city was included on a list of the top 15 most improved meeting destinations by Watkins Research Group. * And, perhaps, best of all: The percentage of Clevelanders who say they would recommend their hometown as a visitor destination jumped dramatically in the past year, from 54 percent in 2015 to 77 percent in 2016. Related: Watch Destination Cleveland's new video celebrating city's success Gilbert said the dramatic shift in perception - both among Clevelanders and outsiders -- is the result of many factors: the successful Republican National Convention last summer and the positive media coverage it generated, the success of the Cavaliers and Indians, and more. "I think people are finally proud of their own community,'' he said. Destination Cleveland, too, deserves some credit, he said. The organization's advertising campaign in 2016 alone helped drive 1.2 million visitors to Cleveland, according to a recent study by Longwoods International, a market research firm. Destination Cleveland, with an annual budget of about $15.5 million, spends about $1.5 million on advertising, according to Gilbert. The agency is funded primarily through the Cuyahoga County's bed tax. Longwoods also reported that every dollar spent on advertising by Destination Cleveland generated $195 in visitor spending and $5 in tax revenue. And that visitor spending translates directly into jobs for Clevelanders, said Dan Walsh, chairman of Destination Cleveland's board of directors. The tourism industry, he said, sustains 66,000 jobs in Cuyahoga County, up from 61,000 five years ago. "It truly is an industry," said Walsh. "This isn't about cheerleading. It's about creating jobs." The agency last year hired the travel consulting team from Ernst & Young to help develop a strategic plan for the next five years. Among the new strategies: Destination Cleveland plans to evolve from a traditional destination marketing organization, responsible primarily for marketing a destination, to a destination marketing and management organization, with responsibilities for improving a visitor's experience once they're here. The agency's funding of pedestrian-focused signage around town is one example of that shift in philosophy. The installation of 54 signs before the RNC was among numerous accomplishments cited at the annual meeting, held at Severance Hall. Other achievements include: * 744 convention leads in 2016, up 17.4 percent over a year before; and 228,500 hotel room nights booked. * 4.4 million visits to the organization's website, thisiscleveland.com, up 36 percent over the year before. * 209 million people reached via the agency's social media campaigns. Also on Thursday, Destination Cleveland honored two local residents key to the city's tourism success: * Jay Casey, a bartender at the Music Box Supper Club, won the Hospitality Star Award, given annually to a frontline employee who provides excellent customer service to Cleveland visitors. Nominated by his manager, Casey was described as an employee who "shines a unique love and light on not just the Music Box or the Flats, but the entire city of Cleveland." * Ginenne Clark, events and publications coordinator for the Society for Photographic Education, received the agency's Cleveland Champions Award, for helping to bring her group's annual conference to Cleveland in 2019. The group, based in Cleveland, will bring 1,500 attendees to the city in March 2019, an event that will generate about $1.8 million in economic impact.
-1 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Cleveland Hotel Akron Ohio Tourism 2015 Greater Cleveland 2010s
Izzie through Jobu: See photos of kitties entered in Cutest Cat contest 2017
Check out this photo gallery to see the cutest cat contenders named Izzie to Jobu. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- It's time to meet the cats named Izzie to Jobu in cleveland.com's contest to find the Cutest Cat in Greater Cleveland. With about 3,500 kitties entered in the contest by their owners, cleveland.com is publishing all the pictures over a 5-week period, organized in alphabetical order by the cats' first names. In the photo gallery above are cats named Izzie to Jobu. One photo gallery will be posted daily at cleveland.com/best through March 14. The Top 100 Cutest Cat finalists will be announced on March 15. The galleries contain one photo of each feline entered in the contest through email or by attending the free photo shoot that was held at cleveland.com's office in January. Meanwhile, a five-person selection committee from cleveland.com is pouring over the photos to decide the 100 finalists. From there, readers will determine the Top 10 -- as well as the order of the Top 10 finish -- through voting in online polls. Here's links to all the other cat photo galleries that have been published: Aaloo through Azusa: See contest photos of cats named Aaloo-Asusa Photo gallery #1 BaBa through Bellah: See contest photos of cats named BaBa-Bellah Photo gallery #2 Bellatrix through Boo: See contest photos of cats named Bellatrix-Boo Photo gallery #3 Boo Boo Beefcake through Buttons: See contest photos of cats named Boo Boo Beefcake-Buttons Photo gallery #4 C.C. through Charley: See contest photos of cats named C.C.-Charley Photo gallery #5 Charlie through Chumbee: See contest photos of cats named Charlie-Chumbee Photo gallery #6 Chumly through Cuddles: See contest photos of cats named Chumly-Cuddles Photo gallery #7 Cupcake through Dolly: See contest photos of cats named Cupcake-Dolly Photo gallery #8 Domino through Ethel: See contest photos of cats named Domino-Ethel Photo gallery #9 Eva through Frankie: See contest photos of cats named Eva-Frankie Photo gallery #10 Frankie through Gio: See contest photos of cats Frankie-Gio Photo gallery #11 Giorgio through Harriet Tubman: See contest photos of cats Giorgio-Harriet Tubman Photo gallery #12 Harry through Ivy: See contest photos of cats Harry-Ivy Photo gallery #13 Throughout February and March we will also publish special category winners such as the cats with the Prettiest Eyes, Best Mustaches and Cats We Most Want to Cuddle With. Look for lots more content throughout the contest at cleveland.com/best, including videos and features. Remember, if you don't see your cat pictured yet, please be patient and watch for the alphabetical galleries to roll out daily through March 14. Notable: To be eligible for the Top 10, the cat must reside in Northeast Ohio (Cuyahoga, Lorain, Medina, Summit, Portage, Lake and Geauga counties). Note to dog lovers: cleveland.com will once again conduct a contest to find the Cutest Dog in Northeast Ohio. It will be conducted during the summertime. More details will be announced at cleveland.com/best in the coming months.
90 points by The Plain Dealer | Cat Greater Cleveland Akron Ohio Cuyahoga County Ohio Lorain Ohio Ohio Cleveland Elyria Ohio
Harry through Ivy: See photos of kitties entered in Cutest Cat contest 2017
Check out this photo gallery to see the cutest cat contenders named Harry through Ivy. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- It's time to meet the cats named Harry through Ivy in cleveland.com's contest to find the Cutest Cat in Greater Cleveland. With about 3,500 kitties entered in the contest by their owners, cleveland.com is publishing all the pictures over a 5-week period, organized in alphabetical order by the cats' first names. In the photo gallery above are cats named Harry through Ivy. One photo gallery will be posted daily at cleveland.com/best through March 14. The Top 100 Cutest Cat finalists will be announced on March 15. The galleries contain one photo of each feline entered in the contest through email or by attending the free photo shoot that was held at cleveland.com's office in January. Meanwhile, a five-person selection committee from cleveland.com is pouring over the photos to decide the 100 finalists. From there, readers will determine the Top 10 -- as well as the order of the Top 10 finish -- through voting in online polls. Here's links to all the other cat photo galleries that have been published: Aaloo through Azusa: See contest photos of cats named Aaloo-Asusa Photo gallery #1 BaBa through Bellah: See contest photos of cats named BaBa-Bellah Photo gallery #2 Bellatrix through Boo: See contest photos of cats named Bellatrix-Boo Photo gallery #3 Boo Boo Beefcake through Buttons: See contest photos of cats named Boo Boo Beefcake-Buttons Photo gallery #4 C.C. through Charley: See contest photos of cats named C.C.-Charley Photo gallery #5 Charlie through Chumbee: See contest photos of cats named Charlie-Chumbee Photo gallery #6 Chumly through Cuddles: See contest photos of cats named Chumly-Cuddles Photo gallery #7 Cupcake through Dolly: See contest photos of cats named Cupcake-Dolly Photo gallery #8 Domino through Ethel: See contest photos of cats named Domino-Ethel Photo gallery #9 Eva through Frankie: See contest photos of cats named Eva-Frankie Photo gallery #10 Frankie through Gio: See contest photos of cats Frankie-Gio Photo gallery #11 Giorgio through Harriet Tubman: See contest photos of cats Giorgio through Harriet Tubman. Photo gallery #12 Throughout February and March we will also publish special category winners such as the cats with the Prettiest Eyes, Best Mustaches and Cats We Most Want to Cuddle With. Look for lots more content throughout the contest at cleveland.com/best, including videos and features. Remember, if you don't see your cat pictured yet, please be patient and watch for the alphabetical galleries to roll out daily through March 14. Notable: To be eligible for the Top 10, the cat must reside in Northeast Ohio (Cuyahoga, Lorain, Medina, Summit, Portage, Lake and Geauga counties). Note to dog lovers: cleveland.com will once again conduct a contest to find the Cutest Dog in Northeast Ohio. It will be conducted during the summertime. More details will be announced at cleveland.com/best in the coming months.
7 points by The Plain Dealer | Cat Greater Cleveland Harriet Tubman Akron Ohio Cuyahoga County Ohio Lorain Ohio Ohio Cleveland
Brush High School, family members honor hockey player days after his unexpected death
Brush High School honored Alec Kornet, the junior who died unexpectedly this week, with a memorial at its playoff game. Watch video KENT, Ohio -- The center position was vacant when Brush High School's hockey team took the ice Saturday, symbolizing the void created by the unexpected death of teammate Alec Kornet. The gesture was part of a pregame memorial for the junior honors student, who died unexpectedly Tuesday after he collapsed during a team practice in Cleveland Heights. His family -- including his brother, sophomore Mike Kornet, who started in goal in the team's regional tournament game against Lake Catholic High School --participated in the memorial by dropping a puck at center ice before the game. The teams also observed a moment of silence in honor of Alec. "This was awesome," Alec's father, Scott Kornet, said after the game. "I didn't know what to expect. Obviously, he's touched a lot of lives. This was overwhelming." Brush High School's 10-0 loss did not dampen the spirits of the several hundred students, teachers and parents who packed the stands at Kent State University's Ice Arena. Hockey players wore black armbands in addition to stickers with Alec's jersey number -- 4 -- on their helmets. The school district also plans to hang a large memorial banner at Cleveland Heights Recreation Center. Alec's family urged the team to take the ice, and the school district wanted to give him a fitting tribute, Brush High School athletic director Mike Murphy said. "Everyone here in support, it's all because of [Alec], and who he was as a person," Murphy said Saturday. "He made a tremendous impact on everyone he came in contact with." Brush High School junior Adam Turk played with Alec on the school's baseball team. The two became friends in middle school. "Alec was the ultimate friend," he said. "The way he lived life, he was always a happy kid. He always wanted everyone to be happy." Alec experienced trouble breathing and collapsed Tuesday during hockey practice at the Cleveland Heights Recreation Pavilion on Monticello Boulevard. He died after paramedics took him to Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, the Cuyahoga County Medical Examiner's Office said. The medical examiner's office has not determined how he died. Scott Kornet said Wednesday that Alec did not have any diagnosed medical conditions that would explain his unexpected death. Alec had also not suffered any injuries or taken any serious hits during recent hockey games or practices, his father added. "He didn't seem disoriented or anything," he said. "Everything seemed normal." Alec was the second of three boys, with a 19-year-old brother and a 15-year-old brother, Scott Kornet said. He was a member of Brush High School's band and its soccer, hockey and baseball teams.Alec's wake will be held Sunday from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the DeJohn-Flynn-Mylott funeral home at 28890 Chardon Road in Willoughby Hills. The family will hold a private funeral service Monday at 11:30 a.m. at the funeral home.
2 points by The Plain Dealer | High school Funeral Ice hockey Cuyahoga County Ohio Baseball
Lakewood couple indicted in stabbing death of dog
Charles Hobbs and Cassandra Biddulph face charges of having weapons while under disability, receiving stolen property, endangering children, cruelty against companion animal and cruelty to animals. Hobbs also faces a charge of domestic violence. LAKEWOOD, Ohio -- A couple accused of stabbing their dog to death in Lakewood has been indicted on multiple charges in Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Court. Charles Hobbs, 30, and Cassandra Biddulph, 33, both of Lakewood, are charged with cruelty to a companion animal. Hobbs is due in court to answer to the charges on Tuesday. Biddulph's arraignment date is March 2. WEWS News 5 reported the charges stem from an incident that happened just before 10:30 p.m. Feb. 10 on Idlewood Avenue. Police responded to a call that a woman had been shot at, according to the news station's report. Officers learned that a dog had been stabbed to death, and that Hobbs and Biddulph claimed the dog had bitten their daughter, according to the news report. Police found no evidence that the child had been bitten, according to WEWS. In addition to  cruelty against a companion animal, Hobbs is charged with animal cruelty, domestic violence, having weapons while under disability, receiving stolen property and endangering children, according to court records. Biddulph faces the cruelty against a companion animal charge as well as charges of animal cruelty, endangering children, receiving stolen property and having weapons while under disability, according to court records. If you'd like to comment on this story, visit Saturday's crime and courts comments section.
495 points by The Plain Dealer | Violence Pet Dog Domestic violence Electric charge Cuyahoga County Ohio Crimes
Greater Cleveland Congregations wants meeting with Dan Gilbert to discuss Q deal
Greater Cleveland Congregations is asking for more investment in neighborhoods as the city and county consider a proposal to renovate Quicken Loans Arena. CLEVELAND, Ohio - Greater Cleveland Congregations is requesting an in-person meeting with Cleveland Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert as the non-partisan coalition of religious groups continues to object to a plan to use public funds to help pay for the renovation of Quicken Loans Arena. The meeting is requested to work out a way to bring some of the money proposed to be spent on the Q arena makeover back to the neighborhoods, according to a news release from GCC. The group, as well as other activist organizations and some residents, don't agree with a plan that would divert taxpayer dollars to downtown development but not invest equal amounts of money in the neighborhoods in their eyes. The group is asking for Gilbert to support establishing a Community Equity Fund which would provide a match of any public funds for the Q makeover to go towards neighborhood priorities, the news release said. An investment of $35 million is being asked from Gilbert personally to capitalize the fund and to help with initial costs to build two mental health crisis centers on the east and west sides of Cleveland, the news release said. "GCC's belief is that the financial benefit Mr. Gilbert and the Cavaliers accrue from the Q far outweighs what Cleveland-area residents receive in return, therefore there must be equity built into the deal in the form of the Community Equity Fund," the news release said. "Examples of these benefits include not paying property tax on the Q building, extracting exclusive value of the building's naming rights, and a Cavaliers franchise now valued at $1.2 billion, up from $375 million when Mr. Gilbert first purchased the Cavs, which the public helps subsidize through the current Q arrangement." As of Saturday morning there was no response to the meeting request. "We ask to meet with Mr. Gilbert in-person in the coming weeks to explain our position on the Q deal and discuss how he can help unite Cleveland, instead of continuing the long history of pitting neighborhoods against downtown," Donna Weinberger, member of GCC's Strategy Team said in the news release. The group met with Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish as well and requested Budish slow down the legislative process and allow transparency and community input. GCC also wants Budish to be a part of the establishment of the Community Equity Fund. Members also spoke out against the proposal Tuesday at the County Council meeting, where the plan will be under consideration for the next few weeks. The group will hold a public meeting March 9 at Ebenezer Baptist Church, 6114 Francis Avenue in Cleveland to update the public on the project. The GCC is a group of faith communities and partner organizations that works to build a greater Cleveland for everyone.
171 points by The Plain Dealer | Cleveland Cavaliers Dan Gilbert Cuyahoga County Ohio 2007 NBA Finals Cleveland Quicken Loans Arena Quicken Loans Akron Ohio
Suspect in slaying of teenage Ohio girl pleads not guilty
CLEVELAND (AP) - A registered sex offender who could face the death penalty for the slaying of a 14-year-old Cleveland girl has pleaded not guilty. A judge on Thursday refused to set bond for 44-year-old Christopher Whitaker, of South Euclid. He faces charges of aggravated murder, kidnapping, rape and abuse ...
-2 points by The Washington Times | Criminal law Assault Murder Capital punishment Crime Sex offender Death penalty Cuyahoga County Ohio
Man shot by Hudson officer had pot in system; Public Square closer to buses' return; inmate threatens Trump: Overnight News Links
Also, Berea parents charged in 7-year-old son's heroin overdose; Here's how Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson plans to quell violence, improve lives of inner-city youth; It's a great day for fossil fuel interests, a very bad day for environmentalists Watch video Featured stories Emirati man fatally shot by Hudson police officer had marijuana in his system, tests show (cleveland.com) RTA, city move closer to reopening Public Square to buses (cleveland.com) Officials: Ohio inmate threatened Trump, sent powder (fox19.com) Crime Berea parents charged in 7-year-old son's heroin overdose (cleveland.com) Man indicted in hit-and-run death of Cleveland police officer tested positive for cocaine, prosecutors say (cleveland.com) Hinckley Township man pleads guilty to shooting brother, sister to death (cleveland.com) Cleveland man stabbed in face, kicks robber in groin during home invasion (cleveland.com) Akron man who raped children, gave them STDs sentenced to life in prison (cleveland.com) Heartless Felons stole thousands of dollars worth of cellphones in multi-state burglary spree, feds say (cleveland.com) Lorain woman stabbed boyfriend in the butt in mini-fridge dispute, police say (cleveland.com) Cleveland man orders sandwich, then robs Mr. Hero, police say (cleveland.com) Man charged in stabbing of Cleveland man during home invasion (cleveland.com) Authorities search for Garfield Heights bank robber (cleveland.com) Cleveland boyfriend, girlfriend accused of luring men to be attacked, robbed (cleveland.com) Authorities arrest Canton man charged with murder in Akron shooting (cleveland.com) Akron man wanted in connection with fatal Cleveland shooting arrested (cleveland.com) Police: Man arrested after attempted hostage situation in Lorain (Lorain Morning Journal) Painesville Township man sentenced for endangering infant son (News-Herald) Woman admits trying to ship marijuana through Willoughby UPS (News-Herald) Cleveland / Cuyahoga County Here's how Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson plans to quell violence, improve lives of inner-city youth (cleveland.com) Ohio City park plan, at Irishtown Bend, gets legs with Clean Ohio grant to buy, clear land (photos) (cleveland.com) Beacon apartment tower in downtown Cleveland aims for spring construction start (photos) (cleveland.com) William Denihan retiring from drug, mental health board after decades of public service (cleveland.com) Cleveland State receives $1 million gift for foster care youth support center (cleveland.com) Local news East Funeral arrangements announced for Brush High School hockey player who died suddenly (cleveland.com) Earthquake concerns: Some Trumbull County residents warned to be prepared (WJW Channel 8) Conneaut Public Works employees rescue six puppies (cleveland.com) Local news West Man hurt by explosive in Sheffield Lake (Elyria Chronicle-Telegram) 10-year-old Lorain student dies after battle with neuroblastoma (Lorain Morning Journal) Amherst mother says Avon basketball players made fun of son's disability (Elyria Chronicle-Telegram) Akron / Canton area Gas leaks discovered at Medina apartment complex involved in fatal explosion (cleveland.com) Spike in fatal crashes by drunk or drugged drivers causing concern in Summit County (WEWS Channel 5) LeBron James pays for Akron students to rebuild homes in ravaged New Orleans (cleveland.com)  Goodyear to upgrade airship operations base with inflatable hanger for Wingfoot Two (cleveland.com) State It's a great day for fossil fuel interests, a very bad day for environmentalists (cleveland.com) Ohio Democrats want Trump administration to keep conflict-of-interest rules for investment advisers (cleveland.com) Gov. John Kasich could win controversial Medicaid changes, thanks to Trump (cleveland.com) Here's which Ohio cities, villages, townships would win or lose money under Gov. John Kasich's budget (database) (cleveland.com) Student loan borrowers would be Donald Trump's personal butler to erase their debt (cleveland.com) Suspect charged in murder of man whose body was found in wooded area near Doylestown (WEWS Channel 5)
2 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Greater Cleveland Frank G. Jackson Ohio Akron Ohio Cleveland Robbery Lorain County Ohio
Beacon apartment tower in downtown Cleveland aims for spring construction start (photos)
Stark Enterprises received another round of design approvals Thursday for the 187-unit apartment building planned on Euclid Avenue. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A city design-review committee greenlighted refined plans Thursday for a 187-unit apartment tower on Euclid Avenue, where developer Stark Enterprises hopes to start construction in the spring. The basics of the Beacon project, a 19-story residential building that will perch atop the 515 Euclid parking garage downtown, haven't changed. But some aesthetic details have shifted since Stark obtained more preliminary design approvals in September. The most notable adjustment is the color. The metal-clad tower still has an ombre look, transitioning from deeper tones at the base to lighter ones toward the top. But the original reddish-brown palette is gone. The Beacon has morphed into a bronze-to-silvery building - a switch that some members of the Downtown-Flats Design Review Committee didn't love. "With the red colors, we really had concerns, and so did our architects, about it becoming pink. A giant, pink building," said Rebecca Hegyes, vice president of development for Cleveland-based Stark. "That is not something that we were interested in." Committee members described the earlier look as more "vibrant" and expressed concerns that the sparkly metallic coating on the metal panels will become more muted with time and exposure to downtown smog and grime. "You've got a choice between giant pink and giant grey," said Thomas Zarfoss, a landscape architect who sits on the committee. Architect Jeffrey Bogart questioned how often Stark will have to clean the building to maintain its sheen. "You've got a bunch of professionals up here telling you that we don't think this neutral, beige-colored building is going to stand the test of time," he said, though he ultimately joined his colleagues in giving the designs a thumbs-up. "We pride ourselves on our product and how it looks," Hegyes said of Stark, the developer and manager of projects including Crocker Park in Westlake and Eton Chagrin Boulevard in Woodmere. "I can't overstate the amount of time we've spent looking at color palettes," she told the committee. Architects at Boston-based Nadaaa and Westlake Reed Leskosky in Cleveland also tweaked the lighting scheme and the layout of the building's roof, where mechanical areas will be partially concealed behind a screen and residents will have access to a party room, outdoor deck and small dog park. Some of those changes were responses to earlier feedback from the design-review committee and the Cleveland City Planning Commission. Other adjustments, such as eliminating a canopy over the storefronts and residential entrance on Euclid, were driven by cost-cutting, said Joshua Haney of Westlake Reed Leskosky. "Overall, I think it's fantastic," committee member Tom Yablonsky said, noting that nearly 600 apartments are coming online or being planned along East Sixth Street between the Leader Building and Garfield Building redevelopments and the Beacon. Stark, which separately is pursuing a much larger project called nuCLEus barely a block away, aims to close on financing for the Beacon in late April or early May and start construction soon after. If that schedule holds, the apartments will be complete in fall of 2018, Hegyes said. The planning commission is scheduled to review the Beacon designs Friday.
10 points by The Plain Dealer | Cleveland Cuyahoga County Ohio Architect Construction Pink Floyd Apartment
4 Northeast Ohio providers owe Medicaid department more than $1 million, state auditor says
Ohio Auditor Dave Yost's office calculated more than $1 million in Medicaid overpayments received by four Northeast Ohio providers. Ohio Auditor Dave YostOhio Auditor's office  COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Four Northeast Ohio Medicaid providers together must pay back more than $1 million in overpayments, says Ohio Auditor Dave Yost. Much of that was received by G.S. Burton Development in Summit County. State auditors calculated $895,617 in overpayments from Burston, stemming from 860 service errors that occurred between 2012 and 2014. Burton largely provided non-medical transportation and personal care aide services, according to the report from Yost's office. Auditors determined 283 of the 22,357 services provided during those two years were by 18 employees deemed ineligible providers for some or all of the time. "These requirements are pure commonsense," Yost said in a news release. "It's disturbing to know that some Ohioans risk being in the care of individuals who lack basic but essential medical training and who haven't even been properly vetted for the job." The findings Employees were ineligible for a variety of reasons: lack of criminal background checks and drug tests, missing personnel files, no first aid and/or CPR certification or failure to complete required annual training hours. The audit also found two drivers didn't have a valid driver's license for some time, one had a suspended license and another driver had a record with six driving points, mandating a warning letter from the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles. Plus interest, Burton owes $951,526 to the Department of Medicaid. The response In a formal response to the audit, CEO Sherice Burton said paperwork and billing errors were just that and services were still provided to Medicaid recipients. Burton said the company grew quickly and moved locations, which caused delays in processing paperwork. The company has since hired another secretary to keep up with forms. "We love what we do and do not want the findings to impede us in anyway. You have our full cooperation and we would like to do whatever we have to so that we can keep our business and continue to serve our community," Burton wrote. Other findings Auditors also found overpayments for three other providers. A Cuyahoga County provider named Sharon Mason was overpaid $49,530 from 2012 through 2014 due to 166 errors in service documentation. The template Mason used to report 74 services was unreliable, auditors determined, and there were other instances of billing additional shifts when only one shift was documented. Auditors also reviewed records for two Lake county intermediate care facilities, which house individuals with intellectual disabilities, for services rendered in 2014. At Madison Village Manor, auditors found $57,061 in overpayments made in 2014. The provider received reimbursements for 241 days of service for an individual after he or she was discharged from the facility. The provider was aware of the error and made efforts to correct the recipient's status. At Broadfield Care Center, auditors identified $24,230 in overpayments. The provider was reimbursed for 86 unauthorized bed hold days. Holding beds when patients are temporarily absent requires authorization.
-2 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Audit Financial audit Cuyahoga River Geauga County Ohio Background check Cuyahoga Valley National Park Driver's license
Brush High School hockey team will play tournament game in honor of teammate's unexpected death
The Brush High School hockey team will take the ice days after one of its players unexpectedly died after collapsing during practice. SOUTH EUCLID, Ohio -- The Brush High School hockey team will take the ice days after one of its players unexpectedly died after collapsing during practice. Alec Kornet's family encouraged the team to play in Saturday's district tournament game against Lake Catholic High School, the South Euclid-Lyndhurst School District said in a statement. The game is scheduled at 7:30 p.m. at Kent State University's Ice Arena. The game will include a moment of silence for Alec, a 17-year-old boy who experienced trouble breathing and collapsed during a Tuesday evening hockey practice at the Cleveland Heights Recreation Pavilion on Monticello Boulevard. The junior honor student died after paramedics took him to Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, the Cuyahoga County Medical Examiner's Office said. The medical examiner's office has not determined how he died. Alec's father said Wednesday that he did not have any diagnosed medical conditions that would explain his unexpected death. Funeral arrangements have not yet been announced. Brush High School hockey players will wear black armbands during Saturday's game. They will also wear stickers with Alec's jersey number -- 4 -- on their helmets, the school district said. "Such immediate and compassionate ways of expressing this tribute, demonstrates the impact that Alec had on so many people in his school district, and, his community," the school district said Thursday in a statement. "The SEL Schools continues to express its deepest condolences to the family of Alec Kornet." The school district also plans to hang a large memorial banner at Cleveland Heights Recreation Center. Brush High School classmates have also begun honoring Alec, the district said in the statement. Students wore Cleveland Indians apparel Thursday in honor of Alec's favorite sports team, and will be allowed to wear Indians gear on Friday as well. Students also created a memorial banner for signatures and messages. In the high school's band room, the snare drum that Alec played in the band is also on display with a bouquet of flowers, the school district said. The Brush High School basketball team will also hold a moment of silence during its Friday evening game, the district said. Alec was on the bench drinking water before he collapsed at Tuesday's practice, his father Scott Kornet said Wednesday outside the family's home in South Euclid. Alec had also not suffered any injuries or taken any serious hits during recent hockey games or practices, his father added. "He didn't seem disoriented or anything," he said. "Everything seemed normal." Scott Kornet and the hockey team's coach performed CPR before paramedics took the boy to the hospital. Alec was the second of three boys, with a 19-year-old brother and a 15-year-old brother, Scott Kornet said. Alec was a member of Brush High School's band and its soccer, hockey and baseball teams, the South Euclid-Lyndhurst City School District said Wednesday in a statement.
84 points by The Plain Dealer | High school Cuyahoga County Ohio South Euclid Ohio Basketball Week-day names Cleveland Charles F. Brush High School Ice hockey
Cleveland Pizza Fest 2017 dates announced
Cleveland Pizza fest is heading back to the Cuyahoga County Fairgrounds this summer. CLEVELAND, Ohio - Organizers have announced the Cleveland Pizza Fest will return to Cuyahoga County Fairgrounds this summer. The fest will be Friday-Sunday, June 23-25. The fest offers a chance for attendees to chow down while pizzerias vie for the coveted 'best pizza' title. Pizzas will be judged in five categories: sauce, crust, toppings, overall and people's choice. Organizers say more than 25,000 people devoured more than 60,000 slices last year. 2016 competitors * Angelo's, Lakewood. * Mama Julianne's, Strongsville. * Lorenzo's, Oberlin. * Primoz Pizza, Cleveland. * Papa Nick's, Cleveland. * Royal Pizza, Parma Heights. * Scott's Fire & Ice (wood-burning fire). * Sauced Wood Burning Fire (Fairview Park). * Pepperoni Cowboy (Catering). * PizzaBOGO (multiple locations). * Romeo's (multiple locations). * Jet's Pizza (multiple locations). Augie's Pizza - winner of last year's best sauce - will be back. Organizers said Augie's is the only pizza vendor from the three original Pizza Bake-Offs held in downtown Cleveland in the 1990s. Vendors will have the opportunity to sell sample-sized slices. The fest will include live entertainment, special events, and more. Schedule * 4 p.m.-midnight Friday, June 23: Bike night. Band: The Spazmatics. * Noon-midnight Saturday, June 24: Classic car show, 5K run/walk, local sports celebrities, kids activities. Bands: Carlos Jones and The Plus Band, The Rocksiders, Blu Monsoon. * Noon-8 p.m. Sunday, June 25: Classic car show, pizza judging, family events. Bands TBA. Admission is $5 ($1 for tweeners, free for those 12 and under). Parking is free. Proceeds benefit The Sam Gagliardi Memorial Lodge Scholarship Fund and the North End Foundation (Berea Youth Works).
10 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Pizza Wood fuel Pizza delivery Brook Park Ohio Cleveland Cuyahoga River Cities in Ohio
Ex-East Cleveland mayor to run in Cleveland; man shot, killed in Akron; inmate dies in medical emergency: Overnight News Links
Also, Brush High School hockey player who died had no diagnosed medical conditions, family says; Demotion of Cleveland airport whistleblower appears to have been in retaliation, OSHA finds; Justin Bieber accused of attacking man in downtown Cleveland Watch video Featured stories Former East Cleveland mayor will run for Cleveland mayor (WJW Channel 8) Man dies after getting shot during fight, crashing vehicle into pole (WEWS Channel 5) Woman charged in drug case dies after 'medical emergency' at Cuyahoga County Jail (cleveland.com) Crime Justin Bieber accused of attacking man in downtown Cleveland (cleveland.com) Akron man charged with arson in explosion that leveled home (cleveland.com) Investigators searching for man who robbed Woodmere bank (photos) (cleveland.com) Cleveland man who carjacked St. Rocco's Festival-goer then caused fatal crash is sent to prison (cleveland.com) Man charged in Cleveland cellphone store armed robbery (cleveland.com) Parma man charged in high-speed police pursuit (cleveland.com) Lorain woman accused of hitting man with van (Lorain Morning Journal) Lorain student reports possible abduction attempt (Lorain Morning Journal) Lorain man faces sixth drunken-driving charge in 14 years (cleveland.com) Cleveland puppy killer who skipped sentencing turns herself in (cleveland.com) Man accused of following Case Western students, fondling self at Panera Bread in University Circle (cleveland.com) Cleveland man charged in connection with two Ohio City bank robberies (cleveland.com) Cleveland / Cuyahoga County Demotion of Cleveland airport whistleblower appears to have been in retaliation, OSHA finds (cleveland.com) Cleveland Clinic CEO Toby Cosgrove reports rough financial year for hospital in 2016 (cleveland.com) Bail reform gets liberal rap but can be bipartisan: 6 states that prove it (cleveland.com) Residents demand Cleveland Public Power make Rockefeller Park lighting repairs (WEWS Channel 5) Cleveland area Applebee's holding fundraisers for fallen Officer David Fahey (WKYC Channel 3) Local news East Brush High School hockey player who died had no diagnosed medical conditions, family says (cleveland.com) Parents at Heights High wanted to be told about student's current felony criminal case (WEWS Channel 5) Pet rescue sues Lake Humane Society after seizure of more than 150 cats (WOIO Channel 19) Immigration law firm holds 'Know Your Rights' workshop at Painesville library (cleveland.com) Local news West Lorain County, cities of Elyria and Lorain join suit against Medical Mutual of Ohio (Elyria Chronicle-Telegram) Discovery of asbestos blocks Elyria library renovation plan (Elyria Chronicle-Telegram) Norwalk woman's obituary raps Trump (Sandusky Register) Akron / Canton area University of Akron to sell president's house after nearly $1 million in work (cleveland.com) Summa violations include inadequate emergency room teaching experience, hostile work environment (Akron Beacon Journal) Akron Public Schools 'State-of-the-Schools' (WKYC Channel 3) New penguins, a red panda and other critters now call the Akron Zoo home (Akron Beacon Journal) Barberton to host Better Block to help brand business district (cleveland.com) State Fourth Ohio child dies of flu-related illness: What you need to know (cleveland.com) Sen. Rob Portman will support Neil Gorsuch for U.S. Supreme Court (cleveland.com) Ohio congress members Marcia Fudge, Tim Ryan back Jaime Harrison of SC for DNC chair (cleveland.com) Gov. John Kasich headed for Germany, England (Associated Press) Marsy's Law for Ohio begins campaign for crime victim ballot initiative (cleveland.com) Lawsuit says Ohio jail officer pepper-sprayed man in restraints (video) (cleveland.com) Man killed in officer-involved shooting in west Columbus (nbc4i.com)
4 points by The Plain Dealer | Akron Ohio Greater Cleveland Ohio Cuyahoga County Ohio Cleveland WOIO Lorain County Ohio Robbery
Williams-Sonoma and Pottery Barn opening stores at Pinecrest development in Orange Village
Pottery Barn and Williams-Sonoma join sister company West Elm, a contemporary furniture retailer also owned by Williams-Sonoma Inc. ORANGE, Ohio -- Specialty retailers Williams-Sonoma and Pottery Barn have announced plans to open stores at Pinecrest, the $230 million mixed-use development opening in spring 2018 at Harvard Road and I-271 in Orange Village. Williams-Sonoma will sell culinary and kitchen essentials from a 6,500-square-foot store that will also offer classes, recipes, entertaining ideas and techniques, and seasonal menus. Williams-Sonoma also has stores at Beachwood LaPlace and at South Park Center in Strongsville. Pottery Barn, which sells casual home furnishings and accessories, is opening a 12,000-square-foot store that will also offer complimentary design services, wedding registry and in-store classes. Pottery Barn also has a store at Beachwood Place Mall. Pinecrest, a 400,000-square-foot open-air town center being developed by Cleveland-based Fairmount Properties and the DiGeronimo Companies, aims to attract retailers, restaurants and entertainment venues that are new to Northeast Ohio. Pottery Barn and Williams-Sonoma join sister company West Elm, a contemporary furniture retailer also owned by San Francisco-based Williams-Sonoma Inc., at Pinecrest. Other confirmed tenants include the already-announced REI, Whole Foods, Vineyard Vines, Orangetheory Fitness, Vernacular and Laura of Pembroke. Its restaurant line-up includes Kona Grill, Red the Steakhouse, City Works, Firebirds Wood Fired Grill, Bibibop Asian Grill, and Fusian; and its entertainment anchors include Pinstripes and Silverspot Cinema. Pinecrest will also eventually feature a 145-room AC Hotel by Marriott, 150,000 square feet of Class A office space and 87 apartments. "Being able to add both Pottery Barn and Williams-Sonoma, in addition to bringing West Elm into the market, really solidifies Pinecrest as the premier resource for stylish home furnishings and accessories in this region," said Heather Kovello, vice president of retail leasing at Fairmount Properties, in a written statement. 
6 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Williams-Sonoma Shopping mall Restaurant Retail companies of the United States Mixed-use development Furniture Decorative arts
Greater Cleveland Volunteers - Opportunities for the week of Feb. 15, 2017
Greater Cleveland Volunteers enriches the community and individuals through volunteer services. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Greater Cleveland Volunteers enriches the community and individuals through volunteer services. We recruit individuals age 18 years+ to volunteer at 100+ nonprofit organizations throughout Cuyahoga County. We offer on-going and special event volunteer opportunities. Connect with us at greaterclevelandvolunteers.org, Facebook and Twitter @CLEvolunteers. We have volunteer coordinators available at 216-391-9500. Here are a few featured volunteer opportunities. Have an interest and don't see it? Call us and a volunteer coordinator will assist. On-Going Home repair needs - Are you available weekdays? Make upgrades to homes of specific screened clients. Keep individual homes in Cuyahoga and neighboring counties safe, accessible and upgraded for seniors. Projects may include installing door knobs, smoke detectors, grab bars, doorbells and hand rails. Help this agency reach their goal to service 100 homes. Background check is required. Contact Sandy at 216-391-9500, x 120 or [email protected] Hospice: A Special Kind of Caring - Respite and friendly pet owner volunteers are encouraged to support caregivers and/or offer weekly pet visits to patients. The dog must be a certified therapy dog. The volunteer must produce current records for the pet and a current Ohio license. Hospice training and background check are required. Contact Sandy at 216-391-9500, x 120 or [email protected] Dramatic Arts - If you're a musician or enjoy the theatre there is an after-school program that is seeking volunteers. If a musician, you could provide valuable lessons to low income students in instrumental and/or vocal music. Piano, violin and vocal teachers are especially needed. Choose to teach one student or a group. The school is located in Ohio City. If you enjoy theatre, assistants are needed for their stage productions. The students enjoy this creative energy outlet! Contact Cecille at 216-391-9500 x 122 or [email protected]
-2 points by The Plain Dealer | Greater Cleveland Cleveland Cuyahoga County Ohio Cuyahoga River Akron Ohio Lakewood Ohio Cuyahoga Valley National Park Theatre
Investigators searching for man who robbed Woodmere bank (photos)
Investigators are searching for a man in connection with a bank robbery Wednesday afternoon in Woodmere. WOODMERE, Ohio -- Investigators are searching for a man wanted in connection with a bank robbery Wednesday afternoon in Woodmere. No one was harmed in the robbery at PNC Bank on Chagrin Boulevard, the Cleveland FBI said in a news release. The FBI released surveillance photos of the man on Wednesday evening. The photos have been included in this post. The man walked into the bank just after 2:30 p.m. and demanded that a teller hand him cash. The teller did not see a weapon, and the man did not imply he had one, the FBI said. The man ran from the bank with an undisclosed amount of cash. Reward money is available to anyone with information leading to the man's identification and arrest. Tipsters can remain anonymous when they contact the Woodmere Police Department or the Cleveland FBI, the FBI said. If you'd like to comment on this post, please visit the cleveland.com crime and courts comments section.
17 points by The Plain Dealer | Bank robbery Crime Federal Bureau of Investigation Law enforcement agency Black-and-white films Cuyahoga County Ohio Criminal justice National City Corp.
Brush High School hockey player who died had no diagnosed medical conditions, family says
Grieving family members said Wednesday they are shocked after a Brush High School student died unexpectedly after collapsing during hockey practice. Alec KornetFamily photo  SOUTH EUCLID, Ohio -- A Brush High School hockey player had no diagnosed medical conditions that would explain his unexpected death Tuesday evening, family members said. Alec Kornet, 17, experienced trouble breathing and collapsed during hockey practice at the Cleveland Heights Recreation Pavilion on Monticello Boulevard. The junior honor student died after paramedics took him to Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, the Cuyahoga County Medical Examiner's Office said. The medical examiner's office has not determined how he died. Alec was on the bench drinking water before he collapsed, his father Scott Kornet said Wednesday outside the family's home in South Euclid. Alec had also not suffered any injuries or taken any serious hits during recent hockey games or practices, his father added. "He didn't seem disoriented or anything," he said. "Everything seemed normal." Scott Kornet and the hockey team's coach performed CPR before paramedics took the boy to the hospital. About a dozen cars lined the street Wednesday afternoon outside the Kornet family home. His father said that numerous friends expressed their support of the family as they grieve their unexpected loss. "We're doing okay," Scott Kornet said. "We're trying to get through this." Alec was the second of three boys, with a 19-year-old brother and a 15-year-old brother, Scott Kornet said. Alec was also a member of Brush High School's band and its soccer, hockey and baseball teams, the South Euclid-Lyndhurst City School District said in a statement. "Alec was an incredibly well-liked and well-respected student by his fellow classmates," school officials said in the statement. "The [South Euclid-Lyndhurst] Schools are deeply saddened by his death, and extend our deepest sympathy to the Kornet family." School district officials declined to offer additional comment Wednesday afternoon. Grief counselors were available Wednesday to students and staff at Brush High School.
445 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio High school South Euclid Ohio Cleveland Heights Ohio Lyndhurst Ohio Death Charles F. Brush High School Euclid Ohio
Woman charged in drug case dies after 'medical emergency' at Cuyahoga County Jail
Nadine Stanley, 37, died after a "medical emergency" at the Cuyahoga County Jail. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A woman in the Cuyahoga County Jail on drug dealing charges died Wednesday after suffering from a "medical emergency" at the jail, officials said. Nadine Stanley, 37, of Cleveland was initially treated at the jail, then taken to Lutheran Hospital, where she died, according to Cuyahoga County spokeswoman Mary Louise Madigan. Madigan said they are releasing no further information about the death, or whether anything was found inside Stanley's cell that would indicate why she became ill. The Cuyahoga County Medical Examiner will determine the cause of death. Madigan said all deaths of inmates trigger an internal investigation.  Stanley was in jail on $1,500 bond after being arrested in January in a drug-dealing investigation. She appeared in court Tuesday morning for a pretrial hearing.  Cleveland police on Jan. 3 raided her home in the 2200 block of West 53rd Street, just north of Clark Avenue and next to Clark Elementary School. Police found she and another man-- Antwaun Stanley, 40-- were selling heroin, cocaine and marijuana, according to court records. They also found digital scales and drug packaging material inside the home, court records say. Stanley also has two other drug-related convictions since 1998.   To comment on this story, visit Wednesday's crime and courts comments page.
204 points by The Plain Dealer | Illegal drug trade Heroin Illness Crime Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs Cuyahoga County Ohio Morphine Cleveland
Who's running for Cleveland City Council? One incumbent faces host of challengers
All seats on Cleveland City Council are up for election in 2017. Incumbents in several of those seats are unopposed at this point. Others, though, may face races with several candidates opposing them. CLEVELAND, Ohio - A member of Cleveland City Council for nearly four decades already faces seven potential challengers for re-election with more than four months to go until the filing deadline.  Cleveland Councilman Ken JohnsonCity of Cleveland Cleveland's Ward 4 Councilman Kenneth Johnson, who took office in 1980, has taken out nominating petitions to get on the ballot for re-election.   And a rule of thumb for local elections is that incumbent officeholders often don't face many challengers for re-election.  But that's not the case for Johnson. Among the challengers who have taken out nominating petitions are community and labor activists and some real estate professionals.   All 17 seats on Cleveland City Council are up for election this year. Candidates have until June 29 to file nominating petitions with the Cuyahoga County Board of Elections if they want to appear on the Sept. 12 municipal primary. The top two vote-getters for each race advance from the primary move to the Nov. 8 general election. If there are only two in a given race, then they go straight to the November ballot, bypassing the primary. Here's a look at potential candidates who have pulled petitions, along with some biographical information on candidates for whom it was available.   Cleveland.com will update this list periodically as the filing deadline nears. Incumbents are noted with an asterisk.  Ward 1  Terrell H. Pruitt*: Member of council since 2008. Major in the Ohio Army National Guard, served two tours of duty in Afghanistan.  Kimberly F. Brown: Former social worker and radio personality who ran for mayor in 2009. Runs an advocacy and marketing group called Doveside Promotions LLC.  Keith Smith   Ward 2   Carol Ford: Nursing home worker. Member of the Raise Up Cleveland petition committee that sought to raise the minimum wage in the city.  Robert Owens: Has pulled nominating petitions for the Ward 2 seat on City Council. He also has pulled candidate petitions for the mayoral race.  Ward 3  Kerry McCormack*: Appointed to City Council in April to replace resigning Councilman Joe Cimperman. Previously was director of community affairs for Ohio City Inc.  Ward 4  Kenneth L. Johnson Sr*: Member of City Council for nearly four decades. Chairs the Municipal Services and Properties Committee and is a member of the Transportation Committee.  Monroe Bynum Jr: CEO of his own company, the IYI Network.   LaShorn K. Caldwell: Housing manager for the Union Miles Development Corp.   Julie Donaldson: Real estate agent.   Cecil Ekechukwu  Michael McDaniel Sr: Advocate with the American Postal Workers Union.   Rowland Mitchell   Gail Sparks: Director and founder of GOA Realty in Cleveland.   Ward 5  Phyllis Cleveland*: Member of City Council since 2006, majority leader.  Ward 6  Mamie J. Mitchell*: Member of City Council since 2008. Vice chair of the Health and Human Services Committee.  Lavitta Murray: Self employed, Murray is studying at Cleveland State's Marshal College of Law.   David B. Roney: Physical director for the city's pools. Develops and coordinates aquatic programs.  Dylan L. Sellers: Management professional who has worked with nonprofit organizations.  Ward 7  TJ Dow*:  A lawyer. Member of City Council since 2008.   Robert L. Heflin III   Basheer Jones: Community activist   Demar L. Sheffey: Public defender  Ward 8  Michael D. Polensek*: Longest serving member of City Council in Cleveland history. Took office in 1978.   Donald Boyd   Brian A. Friedman: Executive director of Northeast Shores Development Corp.   Ward 9  Kevin Conwell*: Member of City Council sine 2001. Vice chair of council's Safety Committee.  Guy Coleman Jr.  Ward 10   Annamaria Cora: Retired from the Cuyahoga County Sheriff's Department.   Rico Dancy   Ed Hudson-Bey  Ward 11  Dona Brady*: Member of City Council since 1999. Vice chair of the Utilities Committee.  Gilder E. Malone  Ward 12  Anthony Brancatelli*: Member of City Council since 2005. Chairs the Cuyahoga County Land Bank.  Ward 13  Kevin Kelley*: Member of City Council since 2006. He became president of council in 2014.  Ward 14  Brian Cummins*: Member of City Council since 2010. Chairs council's Health and Human Services Committee.  Omar Medina: Pastor  Ward 15  Matt Zone*: Member of City Council since 2002. Chairs council's Safety Committee.  Ward 16  Brian Kazy*: Member of City Council since 2015. Former Cuyahoga County probation officer.  Ward 17  Martin J. Keane*: Member of City Council since 2008. Chairs council's Transportation Committee.  Clinton E. Preslan: Lawyer
160 points by The Plain Dealer | Elections General election Cleveland Election Councillor Voting system Cuyahoga County Ohio City council
Eva through Frankie: See photos of kitties entered in Cutest Cat contest 2017
Check out this photo gallery to see the cutest cat contenders named Eva through Frankie. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- It's time to meet the cats named Eva through Frankie in cleveland.com's contest to find the Cutest Cat in Greater Cleveland. With about 3,500 kitties entered in the contest by their owners, cleveland.com is publishing all the pictures over a 5-week period, organized in alphabetical order by the cats' first names. In the photo gallery above are cats named Eva through Frankie. One photo gallery will be posted daily at cleveland.com/best through March 14. The Top 100 Cutest Cat finalists will be announced on March 15. The galleries contain one photo of each feline entered in the contest through email or by attending the free photo shoot that was held at cleveland.com's office in January. Meanwhile, a five-person selection committee from cleveland.com is pouring over the photos to decide the 100 finalists. From there, readers will determine the Top 10 -- as well as the order of the Top 10 finish -- through voting in online polls. Here's links to all the other cat photo galleries that have been published: Aaloo through Azusa: See contest photos of cats named Aaloo-Asusa Photo gallery #1 BaBa through Bellah: See contest photos of cats named BaBa-Bellah Photo gallery #2 Bellatrix through Boo: See contest photos of cats named Bellatrix-Boo Photo gallery #3 Boo Boo Beefcake through Buttons: See contest photos of cats named Boo Boo Beefcake-Buttons Photo gallery #4 C.C. through Charley: See contest photos of cats named C.C.-Charley Photo gallery #5 Charlie through Chumbee: See contest photos of cats named Charlie-Chumbee Photo gallery #6 Chumly through Cuddles: See contest photos of cats named Chumly-Cuddles Photo gallery #7 Cupcake through Dolly: See contest photos of cats named Cupcake-Dolly Photo gallery #8 Domino through Ethel: See contest photos of cats named Domino-Ethel Photo gallery #9 Throughout February and March we will also publish special category winners such as the cats with the Prettiest Eyes, Best Mustaches and Cats We Most Want to Cuddle With. Look for lots more content throughout the contest at cleveland.com/best, including videos and features. Remember, if you don't see your cat pictured yet, please be patient and watch for the alphabetical galleries to roll out daily through March 14. Notable: To be eligible for the Top 10, the cat must reside in Northeast Ohio (Cuyahoga, Lorain, Medina, Summit, Portage, Lake and Geauga counties). Note to dog lovers: cleveland.com will once again conduct a contest to find the Cutest Dog in Northeast Ohio. It will be conducted during the summertime. More details will be announced at cleveland.com/best in the coming months.
12 points by The Plain Dealer | Cat Greater Cleveland Cuyahoga County Ohio Lorain Ohio Akron Ohio Ohio Cleveland Elyria Ohio
3 Cuyahoga County juvenile prosecutors resign; proposal would require teachers to job shadow: Overnight News Links
Also, FBI raids Strongsville-based international adoption agency as part of criminal probe; Opponents, some supporters, of Q renovation plan pack Cuyahoga County Council meeting; Chardon police looking for woman missing since Feb. 5 Watch video Featured stories Three Cuyahoga County juvenile division prosecutors resign as more rape cases go unnoticed (cleveland.com) Ohio teachers would have to job shadow at a business to renew licenses under Gov. John Kasich's budget (cleveland.com) Accused drug dealer locks keys in car, busted after calling police (WJW Channel 8) Crime FBI raids Strongsville-based international adoption agency as part of criminal probe (cleveland.com) Cleveland teen Alianna DeFreeze died of stab wounds, blunt force trauma (cleveland.com) Brooklyn High School employee possibly in inappropriate conduct with students (cleveland.com) Man accused of shooting two teens in crowd watching fight in Cleveland (cleveland.com) Man injured in shooting in Cleveland's Central neighborhood (cleveland.com) Reward offered for capture of Cleveland woman who killed puppy, skipped sentencing (cleveland.com) Brook Park man accused of kicking his pregnant girlfriend (cleveland.com) Garfield Heights man wounded by pellet gun in drive-by shooting (cleveland.com) Eastlake police arrest woman in connection with theft of $2,000 worth of baby formula (News-Herald) Akron man pleads guilty to raping 71-year-old woman (cleveland.com) Teens accused of arranging attempted robbery in Cleveland Heights (cleveland.com) Two pedestrians struck in hit-and-run crashes in Cleveland (cleveland.com) Girl left home alone in Parma Heights while mother went to work, police say (cleveland.com) Cleveland Heights High School student recorded special needs classmate using bathroom, posted it online, police say (WEWS Channel 5) Elyria mom with extradition warrant facing child endangering charge (Lorain Morning Journal) Police: Lorain man resists arrest; faces several charges (Lorain Morning Journal) Sandusky police seize two kilograms of cocaine, three pounds of marijuana (Sandusky Register) Cleveland / Cuyahoga County Head Start board insists it legally fired agency CEO -- who remains on the job (cleveland.com) Opponents, some supporters, of Q renovation plan pack Cuyahoga County Council meeting (cleveland.com) Mayor Jackson says city will need another extension from the FTA on Public Square (cleveland.com) Ed FitzGerald still has money in his campaign account. Here's how he has been spending it (cleveland.com) Missing 12-year-old girl found safe in Cleveland (cleveland.com) Cleveland Humanities Festival illustrates how immigration has affected America (cleveland.com) For 9th year, Cleveland Municipal Judges officiate weddings in Tower City on Valentine's Day (cleveland.com) City's pavement management strategy will be 'worst first' (WOIO Channel 19) Northeast Ohio mom who lost daughter hears her little girl's heart beating in another child (WJW Channel 8) Local news East Chardon police looking for woman missing since Feb. 5 (News-Herald) Immigrants in Painesville and elsewhere can take steps to protect themselves, leaders say (photos) (cleveland.com) Two possible cases of voter fraud being examined in Lorain County (Elyria Chronicle-Telegram) Local news West Oberlin College president takes job at Pace University (Lorain Morning Journal) Brecksville, Independence will hire administrator to run regional dispatch center (cleveland.com) Akron / Canton area City of Akron partners with Salvation Army to bring hot meals to Summit Lake (cleveland.com) State Suspect in killing of Ohio State student was being monitored by GPS, reports say (cleveland.com) Ex-Rep. Dennis Kucinich says intelligence community schemed against Michael Flynn (cleveland.com) Sen. Rob Portman says he listened to fierce critics of Betsy DeVos but 'did my own research' (cleveland.com) Josh Mandel's Senate campaign names Portage County chairwoman -- but it's news to her (cleveland.com) Ohio GOP targets clean energy standards, efficiency rules (cleveland.com) Cursive handwriting back in schools? Some legislators want to require it (cleveland.com) 2-year-old at center of Dayton felonious assault case has died (Dayton Daily News)
3 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Greater Cleveland Lorain County Ohio Cleveland Ohio Cities in Ohio Akron Ohio Elyria Ohio
Opponents, some supporters, of Q renovation plan pack Cuyahoga County Council meeting
More than 200 people packed Cuyahoga County Council chambers Tuesday to voice their opposition and support to the proposed pan to spend tax dollars to renovate Quicken Loans Arena. Watch video CLEVELAND, Ohio - More than 200 people packed Cuyahoga County Council chambers Tuesday on both sides of a proposed plan to spend tax dollars to renovate Quicken Loans Arena. Before the largest crowd ever to attend a meeting since council formed six years ago, a resolution allowing the county to sell $140 million in bonds to expand and update the arena was introduced. Council did not discuss the issue, which will be weighed before the committee-of-the-whole on Feb. 21. But council members listened raptly as about two dozen people spoke for and against the proposal. If approved, the plan will cost a total of $282 million over 17 years, with loan interest and creation of a rainy day fund. Taxes will pay for $160 million of that total. The Cavs will pay $122 million through increased rent payments, Cleveland will provide more than $88 million, using its admissions tax on tickets to Q events from the years 2024 through 2034, and more than $44 million will come from the budget of Destination Cleveland, which will give up a piece of the county bed tax it receives. The county will provide $16 million, by dipping into the reserve fund it set up for the convention center and Hilton Cleveland Downtown, both of which are complete. There will be no new taxes. About two-thirds of the crowd opposed the resolution, but a number of people, including area businessmen, union leaders and Q employees, were there to support the measure. Members of Greater Cleveland Congregations, a non-partisan coalition which represents 100,000 people across 43 congregations and partner organizations in Cuyahoga County, made up the bulk of the crowd.  Leaders told council they want Cleveland and Cuyahoga County to commit as many tax dollars to neighborhood development as are proposed for renovating The Q. Rabbi Joshua Caruso of Anshe Chesed Fairmount Temple said the deal sets a dangerous precedent and wondered aloud what would stop the Cleveland Indians or Cleveland Browns from seeking a similar deal in the future. The money spent by Destination Cleveland, the city and the county could be better used to help neighborhoods, opponents said. They wanted to know what protection there was for the investment and whether the Cavs would leave if they got a new owner or better deal. "I find this deal unconscionable," said GCC member Donna Weinberger of Solon. "This deal is not fair, equitable and not the best we can do to bring vitality and growth to all our neighborhoods." She cited Nike's new 'diversity' ad featuring LeBron James. "The ball should bounce the same for everyone," she said. Pastor Richard Gibson of Elizabeth Baptist Church said if the deal is looked at from a business perspective, council has to determine the best return on an investment. "How do you allocate those funds?" he asked. Gibson said there are many needs that could be met with that money. The Rev. Dr. Jawanza Karriem Colvin, pastor of Olivet Institutional Baptist Church, said the issue could divide a city that had been united behind the Cavs. He asked that the process be slowed down.  The measure could be voted on as early as Feb. 28. GCC members handed council members chocolate and red envelopes that contained invitations to a March 9 meeting their group will hold about the proposal. Among those who spoke in favor of the project were Cleveland Building and Construction Trades Council president Terry Joyce and executive secretary David Wondolowski. They said their organization, which includes about 14,000 members, supports the renovation not only because it means jobs, but because The Q and Gateway have revitalized downtown Cleveland and have led to more development and thousands of jobs for Greater Clevelanders. "Tens of millions has been spent in Cleveland only because people are attending events in the Q," Wondolowski said. "This  is not about downtown versus the neighborhoods-  I want to be really clear about this. It is about our collective future." Chef Rocco Whelan spoke of his commitment to Cleveland, his restaurant employees and the growth of the city. He said the project will lead to additional opportunities. "I feel Cleveland has made tremendous strides," he said. "My blue- and white- collar workers are the strongest reason I stand before you. Like you, I roll my sleeves up daily." Other supporters included businessmen Fred DiSanto, on the board of trustees of the Cleveland Sports Commission; Terry Uhl, executive director of Shoes and Coats for Kids; Marc Nathanson, senior development executive at Youth Opportunities Unlimited; and Joe Marinucci, president and CEO of the Downtown Cleveland Alliance.  Former NBA player and Warrensville Heights Mayor Brad Sellers said his city supports the project but understands the passion of those who oppose it. "This is not an either-or proposition," he said. "You can do one and figure out the other." He recalled his playing days at the Richfield Coliseum and how public investment revitalized downtown Cleveland. He acknowledged there are many unmet needs in Cleveland and Cuyahoga County. "There are 70 good people from Warrensville Heights working at Quicken Loans Arena," he said. "Each one of those people need that money. I want to say that you can do both."
274 points by The Plain Dealer | Cleveland Cavaliers Cleveland Cuyahoga County Ohio Downtown Cleveland Quicken Loans Arena Cuyahoga River 2007 NBA Finals LeBron James
Cleveland-area home sales dipped slightly in January, but prices were up (interactive maps)
Northeast Ohio home sales started 2017 on slightly softer footing, but January prices were up notably from a year before. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Northeast Ohio home sales started 2017 on slightly softer footing, but January prices were up notably from a year before. Across 18 counties, sales were down 1.5 percent from January of 2016, according to fresh figures from the Northern Ohio Regional Multiple Listing Service. That's a difference of only 39 properties, most of them condominiums. // var divElement = document.getElementById('viz1487028787539'); var vizElement = divElement.getElementsByTagName('object')[0]; vizElement.style.width='100%';vizElement.style.height=(divElement.offsetWidth*0.75)+'px'; var scriptElement = document.createElement('script'); scriptElement.src = 'https://public.tableau.com/javascripts/api/viz_v1.js'; vizElement.parentNode.insertBefore(scriptElement, vizElement); // ]]> Prices, meanwhile, were up when compared with last year's levels. The average sale price for a house in the region was $140,765 in January, a 5.6 percent jump from the first month of 2016. At $125,711, the average sale price for a condo was 15.7 percent higher than a year before, the listing service reported. Sales and prices both dipped from December to January, but that's typical at the turn of the year. Among counties with at least 100 transfers in January, Lorain County experienced the steepest annual sales gain - 18 percent. The county's average sale price was up by 8.4 percent, to $149,487, when compared with a year before. In Cuyahoga County, sales topped their January 2016 levels by 1.5 percent, with 852 transactions. The average sale price posted a 4 percent annual gain, reaching $142,720 in January. Sales were essentially flat - down 0.5 percent - in Summit County, home to Akron. But the average sale price, at $138,405, was up 12 percent from a year before. The listing-service data captures most local residential real estate transactions. // var divElement = document.getElementById('viz1487028807457'); var vizElement = divElement.getElementsByTagName('object')[0]; vizElement.style.width='100%';vizElement.style.height=(divElement.offsetWidth*0.75)+'px'; var scriptElement = document.createElement('script'); scriptElement.src = 'https://public.tableau.com/javascripts/api/viz_v1.js'; vizElement.parentNode.insertBefore(scriptElement, vizElement); // ]]> In January, Geauga County had the highest average sale price in the region, at $271,203. Jefferson County, home to Steubenville, had the lowest average sale price, at $80,435. Homes in the region sold for as little as $800 and as much as $2.4 million during January, the listing service reported. The National Association of Realtors and Ohio Association of Realtors are scheduled to release their January home-sales reports on Feb. 22.
25 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Greater Cleveland Geauga County Ohio Summit County Ohio Lorain County Ohio Akron Ohio Ohio counties Cuyahoga Valley National Park