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See the Ohio and U.S. State of the Climate overview for August
NOAA has released the August 2016 regional, statewide, and nationwide climate analysis.
5 points by The Plain Dealer | United States Cuyahoga County Ohio Cleveland Ohio Climate Drought Cuyahoga River Temperature
Brecksville Dam demolition the focus of public hearing tonight in Peninsula (photos)
The public will receive its first look this evening at what the Cuyahoga River will look like after the Brecksville Dam is removed next year or the year after. PENINSULA, Ohio - The public will receive its first look this evening at what the Cuyahoga River will look like after the Brecksville Dam is removed next year or the year after. The open house will be from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Happy Days Lodge, 500 West Streetsboro Road (Ohio 303) just East of Peninsula. The presentation is sponsored by the Ohio EPA and the National Park Service. Conservationists and friends of the Cuyahoga River generally support the dam demolition plan and the environmental benefits the plan will bring to the water quality and wildlife habitat in the river. No organized opposition is expected. "We're excited," said Pam Barnes, a spokeswoman for the Cuyahoga Valley National Park. "This is really a good thing for the river." "This project is exactly what we need for the Cuyahoga," said Peter Bode, watershed coordinator for Cuyahoga River Restoration. "It is ridding a major barrier for our migratory species to spawn upriver ... and nothing but a positive for the ecology of the region." Any grumbling about the dam's removal likely will be limited to steelhead trout anglers who enjoy casting their lines into the base of the dam's spillway, where the game fish congregate, unable to proceed upstream. "That is the shooting-fish-in-a-barrel place to be," said Jane Goodman, Cuyahoga River Restoration's executive director. "But it's a small dam. Most people don't even know it's there. I don't expect anyone except the steelhead anglers to have any objections." The EPA and parks officials will present the results of an environmental assessment conducted on the eight-foot tall, 183-foot long dam which spans the river just north of the Station Road bridge trailhead along the Towpath Trail. The assessment identifies an ecological restoration strategy to improve water quality while preserving the Ohio and Erie Canal's cultural integrity as a National Historic Landmark. The EPA and national park officials have proposed completely removing the dam, thus restoring the river to its natural flow conditions. They plan to install a pump to supply as much as 13 million gallons of water a day to the adjacent canal. By removing the dam, state environmentalists would move a step closer to returning the Cuyahoga to a free-flowing river, leaving the 57-foot high Gorge Dam between Akron and Cuyahoga Falls as the only impediment from its source in Geauga County to its mouth at Lake Erie. Removing the Gorge Dam, however, could cost as much as $70 million.
73 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga River Ohio and Erie Canal Ohio Cuyahoga Valley National Park Lake Erie Greater Cleveland Cuyahoga County Ohio National Park Service
Greater Cleveland Volunteers: Opportunities for the week of September 7, 2016
September 18th - Party in the Parklands! Volunteer at an annual Shaker Lakes Hike and Run. 7:00-10:30 a.m. at the water station and 10:30-1:30 with arts/crafts, activities and food/beverage attendants. Contact Jan at 216-391-9500. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Greater Cleveland Volunteers enriches the community and individuals through volunteer services. We recruit individuals age 18 years+ to volunteer at over 100 nonprofit organizations throughout Cuyahoga County. We offer one-time, ongoing and short-term volunteer opportunities. Connect with us at greaterclevelandvolunteers.org, Facebook and Twitter @CLEvolunteers. We have volunteer coordinators available at 216-391-9500. Here are a few featured volunteer opportunities. Have an interest and don't see it? Call us and a volunteer coordinator will assist. One-time Event: Party in the Parklands! Volunteer at an annual Shaker Lakes Hike and Run on Sunday, September 18th. 7:00-10:30 a.m. at the water station and 10:30-1:30 with arts/crafts, activities and food/beverage attendants. Contact Jan at 216-391-9500 x 124 or [email protected] On-Going Literacy Tutoring: We have several partner agencies that seek before, during and after school tutoring needs. Tell us what school district is close and when you are available. 216-391-9500 [email protected] Hospice of the Western Reserve needs a volunteer to help out at its resale shop on Mayfield Road. A retail background would be great, but is not necessary.  The volunteer would be trained to run the cash register and  assist the full-time manager. An "employee" discount is given to all who volunteer in the shop.  Shop hours are Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and closed on Sundays. The shop sells furniture, household goods, jewelry, collectibles, some clothing, purses, etc. Call Sue at 216-391-9500 x 120 for more information Lunchtime Mentoring: If you have a lunch hour available once a week, during the school year, consider serving as a positive role model to a student in the 4th grade. Contact Carol at 216-391-9500 x 125 or [email protected] Theatre Usher: The Maltz Performing Arts Center (MPAC) in University Circle is a wonderful new venue for music, lectures and cultural enrichment in Cleveland. If you have an interest in adding this to your volunteer efforts contact Cecille at 216-391-9500 x 122 or [email protected] Senior Living Facility: Assist transporting resident to/from their outings. Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays 10:30 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Training and supervision is provided. Contact Lynette at 216-391-9500 x 123 or [email protected]
2 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Greater Cleveland Cleveland Week-day names Cuyahoga River Connecticut Western Reserve Lunch High school
WKSU to host public forum on effects of removing the Gorge Dam
WKSU and Exploradio will hold a public forum and panel discussion Sept. 21 on removing the Gorge Dam on the Cuyahoga River between Akron and Cuyahoga Falls. AKRON, Ohio - The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency has focused on removing the Gorge dam from the Cuyahoga River for more than a decade. The dam is located in the Gorge MetroPark between Akron and Cuyahoga Falls.  In March, the federal government said it would pay 65 percent of the $70 million cost to remove the 57-foot-high dam. Residents can attend a public forum hosted by WKSU and Exploradio to learn more about what removing the dam will mean and what can be done to remove the decades of sludge built up under the dam and downriver. The forum will be Sept. 21 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Sheraton Suites in Cuyahoga Falls. Register for the free event here. All Things Considered host and Exploradio producer Jeff St. Clair will moderate the public discussion. Panelists include representatives from the Ohio EPA, the city of Akron, Summit MetroParks and the local whitewater kayaking community.
7 points by The Plain Dealer | United States Environmental Protection Agency Ohio Federal government of the United States Cuyahoga River Greater Cleveland Akron Ohio Cuyahoga Falls Ohio Cuyahoga Valley National Park
Cleveland 2016 Fall Festival Guide
The end of summer just means the beginning of fall festivals. Northeast Ohio has a full harvest of autumn parties and events planned.
1972 points by The Plain Dealer | Cleveland The Plain Dealer Cuyahoga River George Voinovich Cleveland Press Cleveland Cavaliers
Infant abducted, left in church; suspect jumps deputy; ITT Tech closes campuses: Overnight News Links
Also, Cuyahoga County hindered by $1 billion in debt, report says; Mentor psychic deceived clients out of $1.5 million in cash, jewelry and cars, records say; Strongsville takes up medical marijuana issue Featured stories Infant abducted, left in Akron church (WEWS Channel 5) Suspect jumps deputy, tries twice to steal cruiser (Sandusky Register) ITT Tech closes, including campuses in Warrensville Heights, Strongsville and Akron (cleveland.com) Crime Mentor psychic deceived clients out of $1.5 million in cash, jewelry and cars, records say (cleveland.com) Akron police officer cited for OVI (WEWS Channel 5) Boy found shaking as parents overdosed on heroin in Cleveland park, police say (WJW Channel 8) Man accused of looking up students' skirts at Hathaway Brown School (WJW Channel 8) Amherst Township man gets five years for firefighter hostage situation (Lorain Morning Journal) Euclid man gets probation for egging onslaught on his former neighbor's house (cleveland.com) Dozens of headstones vandalized at historic Cleveland cemetery (cleveland.com) Man shot dead in Cleveland was threatening people at two gas stations, police say (cleveland.com)  Parma man guilty of sex trafficking of child, paying 14-year-old for sex (cleveland.com) Accused gunman fired 27 shots into North Ridgeville home, striking teen in ongoing dispute (cleveland.com) Cleveland man charged in St. Rocco's Fest carjacking, mother's fatal crash appears in court (cleveland.com) Drug agents seize more than 70 kilos of cocaine in Cleveland bust (cleveland.com) Berea family finds drunken stranger asleep in their home (cleveland.com) Sexual predator accused of being part of Cleveland smash-and-grab ring (cleveland.com) Police ask for public's help in finding suspect in Canton double homicide (WEWS Channel 5) District says Brookside High transgender students can use any bathroom (WEWS Channel 5) Cleveland / Cuyahoga County Cuyahoga County hindered by $1 billion in debt, report says (cleveland.com) Local news East Ohio 44 North ramp to Ohio 2 West to close (cleveland.com) Water main break closes Richmond Heights Elementary Wednesday (WKYC Channel 3) Bus driver leaves students unattended in Euclid (WEWS Channel 5) School in Euclid dismisses early because of temperatures (WJW Channel 8) Local news West Strongsville takes up medical marijuana issue (cleveland.com) Oberlin College president to step down in 2017 (Lorain Morning Journal) No charges in hot air balloon incident (Sandusky Register) Akron / Canton area Four injured, including child, in Akron highway crash (cleveland.com) Medical examiner called to scene after person fell at Brandywine Falls in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park (cleveland.com) Fire crews evacuate Akron business after 'hazardous materials release' (cleveland.com) Akron Zoo hosts job fair for Boo at the Zoo, Wild Lights (cleveland.com) Ohio Federal judge erred in last-minute order to keep Cincinnati polling places open in March primary, appeals court says (cleveland.com) Ohio's endangered species: Black bear, rattlesnake, hellbender and more (cleveland.com) State says releasing autopsies in Pike County killings threatens case (cleveland.com) National Democrats pull another $3 million from Ohio's U.S. Senate race (cleveland.com)
-1 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Greater Cleveland Lorain County Ohio Ohio Akron Ohio Cuyahoga River Cities in Ohio Cleveland
Millionaire collected food stamps, prosecutor says; proposal would make abortion murder; officer's neck broken by teens: Overnight News Links
Also, shooting in parking lot of Cleveland police station wounds 1; Tamir Rice 911 call taker disciplined for 'rude, unprofessional' behavior in recent incident; Northeast Ohio schools closed Thursday due to heat Watch video Featured stories Raid targets Geauga County millionaire on food stamps (WKYC Channel 3) Proposal would brand abortion as aggravated murder in Ohio (cleveland.com) Corrections officer's neck broken during teens' breakout (Canton Repository) Crime Shooting in parking lot of Cleveland police station wounds 1 (cleveland.com) Cuyahoga County Jail sergeant disciplined in excessive force case (cleveland.com) Avon police officer on leave after drunken-driving arrest (cleveland.com) Cleveland woman accused of forcing homeless woman into prostitution (cleveland.com) One injured in afternoon shooting near University of Akron (cleveland.com) Cleveland Heights police officer accused of holding gun to his wife's back during domestic dispute (audio) (cleveland.com) Cuyahoga Falls man gets five years in prison for shaking infant (cleveland.com) Cleveland hip-hop artist on house arrest taken into custody after someone shot up his house (cleveland.com) Death penalty trial begins for man charged in Warrensville Heights barbershop slayings (cleveland.com) Felon tied to Cleveland smash-and-grab ring (cleveland.com) Three teens charged in separate robberies in Cleveland Heights (cleveland.com) Detroit-area trucking company owner sentenced to nine years for dealing club drugs (cleveland.com) Two charged after Cleveland federal agents seize more than 200 pounds of cocaine (cleveland.com) Four shot in three hours in Cleveland, including teen (cleveland.com) FBI expands search for man they believe abducted one girl, tried to snatch another (WEWS Channel 5) Sheffield Township man arrested after Lorain shooting (Lorain Morning Journal) Cleveland / Cuyahoga County Tamir Rice 911 call taker disciplined for 'rude, unprofessional' behavior in recent incident (cleveland.com) Northeast Ohio schools closed Thursday due to heat (cleveland.com) How hot is too hot for school when there's no air conditioning? (cleveland.com) Donald Trump to appear at Cleveland charter school Thursday (cleveland.com) Monument company to review vandalism damage at historic Cleveland cemetery (cleveland.com) Cleveland paints over accidental bike lane on Ontario (cleveland.com) Jack Cleveland Casino revenue rebounds in August (cleveland.com) More RTA service cuts go into effect Sunday (cleveland.com) Local news East John Carroll University closes 2 dorms because of power outage (cleveland.com) Local news West Elderly man found dead at Brandywine Falls in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park (cleveland.com) Akron / Canton area Newly merged Cleveland Clinic Akron General names president (cleveland.com) State Sen. Rob Portman launches investigation into EpiPen pricing (cleveland.com) The most famous person from each county in Ohio (cleveland.com)
2 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Greater Cleveland Akron Ohio Ohio Cleveland Summit County Ohio Cuyahoga River Cuyahoga Valley National Park
4 Northeast Ohio providers owe Medicaid department more than $1 million, state auditor says
Ohio Auditor Dave Yost's office calculated more than $1 million in Medicaid overpayments received by four Northeast Ohio providers. Ohio Auditor Dave YostOhio Auditor's office  COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Four Northeast Ohio Medicaid providers together must pay back more than $1 million in overpayments, says Ohio Auditor Dave Yost. Much of that was received by G.S. Burton Development in Summit County. State auditors calculated $895,617 in overpayments from Burston, stemming from 860 service errors that occurred between 2012 and 2014. Burton largely provided non-medical transportation and personal care aide services, according to the report from Yost's office. Auditors determined 283 of the 22,357 services provided during those two years were by 18 employees deemed ineligible providers for some or all of the time. "These requirements are pure commonsense," Yost said in a news release. "It's disturbing to know that some Ohioans risk being in the care of individuals who lack basic but essential medical training and who haven't even been properly vetted for the job." The findings Employees were ineligible for a variety of reasons: lack of criminal background checks and drug tests, missing personnel files, no first aid and/or CPR certification or failure to complete required annual training hours. The audit also found two drivers didn't have a valid driver's license for some time, one had a suspended license and another driver had a record with six driving points, mandating a warning letter from the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles. Plus interest, Burton owes $951,526 to the Department of Medicaid. The response In a formal response to the audit, CEO Sherice Burton said paperwork and billing errors were just that and services were still provided to Medicaid recipients. Burton said the company grew quickly and moved locations, which caused delays in processing paperwork. The company has since hired another secretary to keep up with forms. "We love what we do and do not want the findings to impede us in anyway. You have our full cooperation and we would like to do whatever we have to so that we can keep our business and continue to serve our community," Burton wrote. Other findings Auditors also found overpayments for three other providers. A Cuyahoga County provider named Sharon Mason was overpaid $49,530 from 2012 through 2014 due to 166 errors in service documentation. The template Mason used to report 74 services was unreliable, auditors determined, and there were other instances of billing additional shifts when only one shift was documented. Auditors also reviewed records for two Lake county intermediate care facilities, which house individuals with intellectual disabilities, for services rendered in 2014. At Madison Village Manor, auditors found $57,061 in overpayments made in 2014. The provider received reimbursements for 241 days of service for an individual after he or she was discharged from the facility. The provider was aware of the error and made efforts to correct the recipient's status. At Broadfield Care Center, auditors identified $24,230 in overpayments. The provider was reimbursed for 86 unauthorized bed hold days. Holding beds when patients are temporarily absent requires authorization.
-2 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Audit Financial audit Cuyahoga River Geauga County Ohio Background check Cuyahoga Valley National Park Driver's license
Cleveland Pizza Fest 2017 dates announced
Cleveland Pizza fest is heading back to the Cuyahoga County Fairgrounds this summer. CLEVELAND, Ohio - Organizers have announced the Cleveland Pizza Fest will return to Cuyahoga County Fairgrounds this summer. The fest will be Friday-Sunday, June 23-25. The fest offers a chance for attendees to chow down while pizzerias vie for the coveted 'best pizza' title. Pizzas will be judged in five categories: sauce, crust, toppings, overall and people's choice. Organizers say more than 25,000 people devoured more than 60,000 slices last year. 2016 competitors * Angelo's, Lakewood. * Mama Julianne's, Strongsville. * Lorenzo's, Oberlin. * Primoz Pizza, Cleveland. * Papa Nick's, Cleveland. * Royal Pizza, Parma Heights. * Scott's Fire & Ice (wood-burning fire). * Sauced Wood Burning Fire (Fairview Park). * Pepperoni Cowboy (Catering). * PizzaBOGO (multiple locations). * Romeo's (multiple locations). * Jet's Pizza (multiple locations). Augie's Pizza - winner of last year's best sauce - will be back. Organizers said Augie's is the only pizza vendor from the three original Pizza Bake-Offs held in downtown Cleveland in the 1990s. Vendors will have the opportunity to sell sample-sized slices. The fest will include live entertainment, special events, and more. Schedule * 4 p.m.-midnight Friday, June 23: Bike night. Band: The Spazmatics. * Noon-midnight Saturday, June 24: Classic car show, 5K run/walk, local sports celebrities, kids activities. Bands: Carlos Jones and The Plus Band, The Rocksiders, Blu Monsoon. * Noon-8 p.m. Sunday, June 25: Classic car show, pizza judging, family events. Bands TBA. Admission is $5 ($1 for tweeners, free for those 12 and under). Parking is free. Proceeds benefit The Sam Gagliardi Memorial Lodge Scholarship Fund and the North End Foundation (Berea Youth Works).
10 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Pizza Wood fuel Pizza delivery Brook Park Ohio Cleveland Cuyahoga River Cities in Ohio
Greater Cleveland Volunteers - Opportunities for the week of Feb. 15, 2017
Greater Cleveland Volunteers enriches the community and individuals through volunteer services. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Greater Cleveland Volunteers enriches the community and individuals through volunteer services. We recruit individuals age 18 years+ to volunteer at 100+ nonprofit organizations throughout Cuyahoga County. We offer on-going and special event volunteer opportunities. Connect with us at greaterclevelandvolunteers.org, Facebook and Twitter @CLEvolunteers. We have volunteer coordinators available at 216-391-9500. Here are a few featured volunteer opportunities. Have an interest and don't see it? Call us and a volunteer coordinator will assist. On-Going Home repair needs - Are you available weekdays? Make upgrades to homes of specific screened clients. Keep individual homes in Cuyahoga and neighboring counties safe, accessible and upgraded for seniors. Projects may include installing door knobs, smoke detectors, grab bars, doorbells and hand rails. Help this agency reach their goal to service 100 homes. Background check is required. Contact Sandy at 216-391-9500, x 120 or [email protected] Hospice: A Special Kind of Caring - Respite and friendly pet owner volunteers are encouraged to support caregivers and/or offer weekly pet visits to patients. The dog must be a certified therapy dog. The volunteer must produce current records for the pet and a current Ohio license. Hospice training and background check are required. Contact Sandy at 216-391-9500, x 120 or [email protected] Dramatic Arts - If you're a musician or enjoy the theatre there is an after-school program that is seeking volunteers. If a musician, you could provide valuable lessons to low income students in instrumental and/or vocal music. Piano, violin and vocal teachers are especially needed. Choose to teach one student or a group. The school is located in Ohio City. If you enjoy theatre, assistants are needed for their stage productions. The students enjoy this creative energy outlet! Contact Cecille at 216-391-9500 x 122 or [email protected]
-2 points by The Plain Dealer | Greater Cleveland Cleveland Cuyahoga County Ohio Cuyahoga River Akron Ohio Lakewood Ohio Cuyahoga Valley National Park Theatre
Opponents, some supporters, of Q renovation plan pack Cuyahoga County Council meeting
More than 200 people packed Cuyahoga County Council chambers Tuesday to voice their opposition and support to the proposed pan to spend tax dollars to renovate Quicken Loans Arena. Watch video CLEVELAND, Ohio - More than 200 people packed Cuyahoga County Council chambers Tuesday on both sides of a proposed plan to spend tax dollars to renovate Quicken Loans Arena. Before the largest crowd ever to attend a meeting since council formed six years ago, a resolution allowing the county to sell $140 million in bonds to expand and update the arena was introduced. Council did not discuss the issue, which will be weighed before the committee-of-the-whole on Feb. 21. But council members listened raptly as about two dozen people spoke for and against the proposal. If approved, the plan will cost a total of $282 million over 17 years, with loan interest and creation of a rainy day fund. Taxes will pay for $160 million of that total. The Cavs will pay $122 million through increased rent payments, Cleveland will provide more than $88 million, using its admissions tax on tickets to Q events from the years 2024 through 2034, and more than $44 million will come from the budget of Destination Cleveland, which will give up a piece of the county bed tax it receives. The county will provide $16 million, by dipping into the reserve fund it set up for the convention center and Hilton Cleveland Downtown, both of which are complete. There will be no new taxes. About two-thirds of the crowd opposed the resolution, but a number of people, including area businessmen, union leaders and Q employees, were there to support the measure. Members of Greater Cleveland Congregations, a non-partisan coalition which represents 100,000 people across 43 congregations and partner organizations in Cuyahoga County, made up the bulk of the crowd.  Leaders told council they want Cleveland and Cuyahoga County to commit as many tax dollars to neighborhood development as are proposed for renovating The Q. Rabbi Joshua Caruso of Anshe Chesed Fairmount Temple said the deal sets a dangerous precedent and wondered aloud what would stop the Cleveland Indians or Cleveland Browns from seeking a similar deal in the future. The money spent by Destination Cleveland, the city and the county could be better used to help neighborhoods, opponents said. They wanted to know what protection there was for the investment and whether the Cavs would leave if they got a new owner or better deal. "I find this deal unconscionable," said GCC member Donna Weinberger of Solon. "This deal is not fair, equitable and not the best we can do to bring vitality and growth to all our neighborhoods." She cited Nike's new 'diversity' ad featuring LeBron James. "The ball should bounce the same for everyone," she said. Pastor Richard Gibson of Elizabeth Baptist Church said if the deal is looked at from a business perspective, council has to determine the best return on an investment. "How do you allocate those funds?" he asked. Gibson said there are many needs that could be met with that money. The Rev. Dr. Jawanza Karriem Colvin, pastor of Olivet Institutional Baptist Church, said the issue could divide a city that had been united behind the Cavs. He asked that the process be slowed down.  The measure could be voted on as early as Feb. 28. GCC members handed council members chocolate and red envelopes that contained invitations to a March 9 meeting their group will hold about the proposal. Among those who spoke in favor of the project were Cleveland Building and Construction Trades Council president Terry Joyce and executive secretary David Wondolowski. They said their organization, which includes about 14,000 members, supports the renovation not only because it means jobs, but because The Q and Gateway have revitalized downtown Cleveland and have led to more development and thousands of jobs for Greater Clevelanders. "Tens of millions has been spent in Cleveland only because people are attending events in the Q," Wondolowski said. "This  is not about downtown versus the neighborhoods-  I want to be really clear about this. It is about our collective future." Chef Rocco Whelan spoke of his commitment to Cleveland, his restaurant employees and the growth of the city. He said the project will lead to additional opportunities. "I feel Cleveland has made tremendous strides," he said. "My blue- and white- collar workers are the strongest reason I stand before you. Like you, I roll my sleeves up daily." Other supporters included businessmen Fred DiSanto, on the board of trustees of the Cleveland Sports Commission; Terry Uhl, executive director of Shoes and Coats for Kids; Marc Nathanson, senior development executive at Youth Opportunities Unlimited; and Joe Marinucci, president and CEO of the Downtown Cleveland Alliance.  Former NBA player and Warrensville Heights Mayor Brad Sellers said his city supports the project but understands the passion of those who oppose it. "This is not an either-or proposition," he said. "You can do one and figure out the other." He recalled his playing days at the Richfield Coliseum and how public investment revitalized downtown Cleveland. He acknowledged there are many unmet needs in Cleveland and Cuyahoga County. "There are 70 good people from Warrensville Heights working at Quicken Loans Arena," he said. "Each one of those people need that money. I want to say that you can do both."
274 points by The Plain Dealer | Cleveland Cavaliers Cleveland Cuyahoga County Ohio Downtown Cleveland Quicken Loans Arena Cuyahoga River 2007 NBA Finals LeBron James
RTA riders rally to reopen Public Square to buses; 'whistleblower' targets Pilot Flying J: Overnight News Links
Also, RTA riders rally for reopening of Public Square to buses; Cleveland Teachers Union leaders and school district reach a possible contract; Prosecutors uncover dozens of uncharged juvenile cases, including rape Watch video Featured stories RTA riders rally for reopening of Public Square to buses (cleveland.com) Pilot of 48 years, on Cessna disappearance: Not likely weather-related (WOIO Channel 19) 'Whistleblower' claims Pilot Flying J fraud cheated federal government (WKYC Channel 3) Cleveland Teachers Union leaders and school district reach a possible contract (cleveland.com) Crime Prosecutors uncover dozens of uncharged juvenile cases, including rape (cleveland.com) Prosecutors will seek death penalty against suspect in Alianna DeFreeze killing (cleveland.com)  Heartless Felon gang member pistol-whipped, shot Cleveland teen at close range, police say (cleveland.com) Computer stolen at gunpoint in Akron Craigslist robbery (cleveland.com) Four robbed in 12 days at Cleveland State, university says (cleveland.com) Five Cuyahoga County banks robbed in one day, FBI says (cleveland.com) Man wanted in 2015 fatal Akron gas station shootout arrested (cleveland.com) Cleveland man who ran online child porn sharing group pleads guilty (cleveland.com) Cleveland man charged in fatal shooting in city's Clark-Fulton neighborhood (cleveland.com) Cleveland man shot while running from drive-by shooting (cleveland.com) Thieves steal $4,500 Boy Scout trailer with pinewood derby track inside (WOIO Channel 19) Lorain fatal shooting under investigation (Lorain Morning Journal) Lorain man sentenced for 2015 fatal crash (Lorain Morning Journal) Cleveland / Cuyahoga County FAA releases air traffic control audio in Lake Erie plane crash that killed 6 (cleveland.com) Allegiant Air launches service in Cleveland; 4 things to know about Hopkins' newest carrier (cleveland.com) Missing Cleveland man has been found, police say (cleveland.com) Local news East Colleges work together to improve Lake and Geauga counties (cleveland.com) Local news West Avon infant beats odds, gets new heart (WKYC Channel 3) Bat species could be latest roadblock in NEXUS pipeline through Northeast Ohio (WEWS Channel 5) Amish buggy driver has survived 14 accidents (Elyria Chronicle-Telegram) Akron / Canton area Gov. John Kasich appoints two judges to Akron Municipal Court (cleveland.com) City passes $966 million in 2017 spending plans (Akron Beacon Journal) Cuyahoga Falls offers safe exchange location for craigslist, Facebook purchases (cleveland.com) State 'Right-to-work' bill introduced in Ohio House (cleveland.com) Trump administration pulls back federal stance on transgender restroom use (cleveland.com) President Donald Trump cancels planned visit to Northeast Ohio (cleveland.com) Opioid addiction means more Ohio kids in protective custody (cleveland.com) Josh Mandel, gearing up for 2018 Senate run, has recruited campaign leaders in all 88 Ohio counties (cleveland.com) How technology could change Ohio, according to Gov. John Kasich (cleveland.com)
2 points by The Plain Dealer | Ohio Greater Cleveland Akron Ohio Cuyahoga River Cleveland Cuyahoga County Ohio Cuyahoga Valley National Park Summit County Ohio
Q renovation financing of $140 million before Cuyahoga County Council on Tuesday
The process to borrow $140 million to renovate Quicken Loans Arena begins Tuesday when a resolution to sell bonds to finance the project is introduced at Cuyahoga County Council. CLEVELAND, Ohio - The process to borrow $140 million to expand and update  Quicken Loans Arena begins Tuesday when a resolution is introduced at Cuyahoga County Council. Here's what you need to know. What is the project? In December, the Cleveland Cavaliers and county and city leaders announced a plan to upgrade the 22-year-old arena. The $140 million reconstruction will modernize it with a glass front, public gathering spaces and dining areas. The Q is one of the oldest NBA arenas in the nation without a major update, and civic leaders fear that without a renovation, Cleveland will stop attracting top entertainment acts. The Q will stretch all the way to Huron Road, taking in the outdoor space from Ontario Street east to East 6th Street. The reconstruction will increase space for dining and bars, fan zones and other gathering spaces by more than 60 percent, to 153,000 square feet. The update will make the Q competitive with newer arenas in Pittsburgh, Detroit and Columbus. Who will fund the improvements? The county will sell $140 million in bonds for the project. If approved, the plan will cost a total of $282 million over 17 years, with loan interest and creation of a rainy day fund, and taxes will pay for $160 million. The Cavs will pay $122 million through increased rent payments. Cleveland will provide more than $88 million, using its admissions tax on tickets to Q events from the years 2024 through 2034. More than $44 million will come from the budget of Destination Cleveland, which will give up a piece of the county bed tax it receives. The county will provide $16 million, by dipping into the reserve fund it set up for the convention center and Hilton Cleveland Downtown, both of which are complete. Is there any opposition to the project? Greater Cleveland Congregations, a non-partisan coalition which represents 100,000 people across 43 congregations and partner organizations in Cuyahoga County, wants Cleveland and Cuyahoga County to commit as many tax dollars to neighborhood development as are proposed for renovating the Q. The organization said more than 100 leaders are expected to attend Tuesday's meeting. "As legislation on the Q upgrade is officially introduced, GCC leaders will deliver messages to County Council on Valentine's Day urging them to reject a"sweetheart deal" on the Q and stand up for neighborhoods," officials said in a news release. The Cuyahoga County Progressive Caucus opposes spending any tax dollars to renovate the arena. What the process? The resolution will be introduced on Tuesday. Council members are not expected to comment and the measure will be referred to the Committee of the Whole. The committee, which includes all council members, is scheduled to meet Feb. 21. Audience members can comment on the resolution Tuesday during the public comment portion of the meeting, which begins at 5 p.m. See the resolution below (with a 2 page summary at the end) or click here if on a mobile device. How can I attend or watch?  The meeting is held on the fourth floor of the Cuyahoga County Administrative Headquarters, 2079 East 9th Street, Cleveland. Visitors can park in the attached garage and parking will be validated at the meeting. The meeting will also be livestreamed on the council website, council.cuyahogacounty.us // DV.load("https://www.documentcloud.org/documents/3460828-20170214-MTG-AgendaAttachReduced.js", { width: 600, height: 800, sidebar: false, container: "#DV-viewer-3460828-20170214-MTG-AgendaAttachReduced" }); // ]]>
91 points by The Plain Dealer | Cleveland Cuyahoga County Ohio Akron Ohio Greater Cleveland Renovation Lakewood Ohio Ohio Cuyahoga River
Winter hoots: Looking and listening for owls in Northeast Ohio: Morgan Paskert, Lake Erie Nature and Science Center
Guest columnist Morgan Paskert, of the Lake Erie Nature & Science Center, draws readers' attention to owls that populate Northeast Ohio. Morgan Paskert is with the Lake Erie Nature & Science Center. Morgan Paskert  Guest columnist Morgan Paskert is on staff at Lake Erie Nature & Science Center in Bay Village. Lake Erie Nature & Science Center is a nonprofit organization funded by donations, class fees and grants including Cuyahoga Arts & Culture through county residents. Some of the most fascinating wild animals in Ohio are owls. Their mysterious nature, charismatic expressions and recognizable calls have sparked interest for centuries. Most people will claim to have never seen a nocturnal owl in the wild, but chances are they have been near one without knowing it. Both migratory and non-migratory owls can be found in Northeast Ohio throughout the year, especially during the winter months. When people think of migratory animals in Ohio, waterfowl and songbirds are often the first to come to mind. However, almost every winter a Snowy Owl is spotted along the shoreline of Lake Erie as it migrates south from the Arctic. If seen, Snowy Owls are typically sitting on or near the ground in open areas along lakes and oceans. They are also known to inhabit airports, as the flat open space of an airport closely mimics their breeding habitat in the Arctic Circle. This week, Northeast Ohio birders were able to catch a glimpse of one at Burke Lakefront Airport. In addition to the rare winter stop of a Snowy Owl, up to eight owl species reside in Northeast Ohio throughout the year. Three of the most common include the Great Horned Owl, the Barred Owl and the Eastern Screech-Owl. Great Horned Owls can be found all across the continental U.S. and are among the earliest to nest in Northeast Ohio. Despite winter's harsh conditions, females are already incubating and can keep their eggs at a temperature exceeding 98 degrees. After a successful nesting season, owlets will hatch completely featherless and heavily reliant on their parents around late February, and will remain near their parents until the end of summer. Great Horned Owls live in a broad range of habitats, most typically in woods interspersed with open land. They may be difficult to see at night, but a deep series of hoots will indicate one is near. Barred Owls are also common to Northeast Ohio, but difficult to find as they are well camouflaged in large, mature oak and evergreen forests. Barred Owls claim their territory and tend to revisit the same location for months at a time. If they cannot be spotted, listen for their notorious hooting call that resembles the phrase: "Who cooks for you? Who cooks for you all?" A popular pair of Barred Owls can be seen and heard near Lake Erie Nature & Science Center, throughout the trails of Huntington Reservation in Cleveland Metroparks. The smallest of Ohio's owls, the Eastern Screech-Owl, remains in the state year round. These owls cope with winter exceptionally well, despite their size of 12 ounces. Their hearing is so well developed that they can hear their prey move as it tunnels under the snow, making them successful hunters. Like most owl species, Eastern Screech-Owls are far more heard than seen. Listen for their loud trilling call from the trees in most types of woods, city parks and even your own backyard. If you cannot find an owl in the wild, not to worry! Join Lake Erie Nature & Science Center for an up-close look at their resident owls during "Owl Prowl" on Friday, Feb. 17 from 7-9 p.m. For advance registration, visit lensc.org or call (440) 871-2900. Have something to say about this topic? Use the comments to share your thoughts, and stay informed when readers reply to your comments by using the Notification Settings (in blue) just below. Readers are invited to submit Opinion page essays on topics of regional or general interest. Send your 500-word essay for consideration to Linda Kinsey at [email protected] Essays must also include a brief bio and headshot of the writer. Essays rebutting today's topics are also welcome.  
35 points by The Plain Dealer | Owls Horned owl Ohio Pennsylvania Cuyahoga River Birds of North America Owl Snowy Owl
Family mystery solved decades after man was last seen
BEREA, Ohio (AP) — A painful family mystery has been solved after authorities in Ohio's Cuyahoga County recently identified a man killed by a train outside a Cleveland suburb nearly four decades ago using new technology.
-2 points by Arizona Daily Star | Police Cuyahoga County Ohio Native Americans in the United States Michigan Cuyahoga River Ohio Kentucky Cleveland
Cuyahoga County Sheriff's Department offers Citizens Academy
The Cuyahoga County Sheriff's Department is offering a citizens academy for residents to learn about law enforcement operations. CLEVELAND, Ohio - The Cuyahoga County Sheriff's Department is offering a citizens academy for residents to learn about law enforcement operations. The department's first citizens academy was held in the spring of 2016 and the department listened to feedback to improve the program, Sheriff Clifford Pinkney said in a statement.  "We've extended the program in order to incorporate more activities and opportunities to educate our residents on our role in law enforcement," he said. The free program has been extended from 8 to 10 weeks. It will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. Wednesdays beginning March 22 in the Justice Center. Residents can expect to participate in interactive demonstrations, lectures, and field trips that will cover the following topics: Corrections Crime Stoppers Firearm Safety Juvenile Detention Special Weapon and Tactics (SWAT)   Eligibility requirements include: County resident Age 21 or older No felony convictions Passing a background check The academy is limited to 25 residents and does not give any law enforcement authority to academy graduates. For more information or to download the application, please visit: http://sheriff.cuyahogacounty.us/en-US/CC-Sheriffs-CitizensAcademy.aspx.  The application deadline is March 10.
46 points by The Plain Dealer | Police Law Plato Cuyahoga County Ohio Academia Cleveland Greater Cleveland Cuyahoga River
Ohio hopes to "streamline" student testing, says State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria
Ohio is trying to find ways to reduce standardized testing of students, state Superintendent Paolo DeMaria says CLEVELAND, Ohio - The Ohio Department of Education hopes the state can "streamline" the standardized testing of students, State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria told legislators Monday. DeMaria spelled out no details of how that would happen in his testimony to the finance committee of the Ohio House. That's still to be determined in conversations with legislators and Gov. John Kasich. But it was his first commitment to reducing testing, in response to residents across Ohio complaining last year that too much testing was their biggest concern with education in the state. Residents expressed in several public hearings and in statewide polls that standardized testing by the state and districts, often just to evaluate the performance of teachers or predict how students would do on other tests, was excessive. "We also heard many comments about the need to continue to focus on reducing the number of tests," DeMaria told the committee. "For this reason, we are committed to an ongoing, inclusive process to identify specifically where Ohio can streamline its assessments and make meaningful modifications." He noted that because much of the state's standardized testing is mandated by state or federal law, reductions could need a law change. DeMaria's testimony Monday offered some clarification the vague language in Ohio's draft of the education improvement plan that it will submit to the federal government as part of the new Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). That law, which replaces the controversial No Child Left Behind program, lets states set their own plans for making schools better and for identifying and helping struggling schools. The draft plan released recently had not committed to seeking any reductions in testing. DeMaria and the Ohio Department of Education also offered no proposals for any testing changes. "As part of ESSA, Ohio will reexamine its testing requirements," the draft states. "The department is poised to work closely with the governor, legislature and education leaders to examine the pros and cons of adjusting the testing schedule-- guided by the lens of what is best for future student success." Chris Woolard, the department's director of school accountability, told The Plain Dealer Monday that any test reductions are unlikely to happen by the state's planned April 3 submission of its plan to the U.S. Department of Education for review. That's partly because tests for high school students are being reviewed by a panel created by the state school board and which won't have recommendations until April. That panel is reviewing the state's new graduation requirements that make students score well on tests to receive a diploma. Any changes to state tests for younger grades or for teacher evaluations would also need law changes that can take months, Woolard noted. "We're encouraging the conversation to reduce testing," he said. But he added, "We're not at the point of asking to get rid of 'X' test." As we have reported previously, too much state standardized testing was the dominant complaint at the department's feedback session for Cuyahoga County on the plan, held at Cuyahoga Community College in September. It was also the top concern statewide, the state school board was told in November. "The amount of testing was at the top, followed closely by concerns around charter schools," Colleen Grady, the former Strongsville school board member who is now a senior policy advisor for the Ohio Department of Education, told the board then. Lisa Gray of Philanthropy Ohio, who helped run the forums, told the board that she also heard complaints about "too many assessments that take too much time" at all of the forums, and from parents, community members and educators alike.
44 points by The Plain Dealer | United States School Education Cuyahoga County Ohio Federal government of the United States High school Cuyahoga River Law of the United States
VA offers free resource fair about benefits, claims and services
A presentation regarding Department of Veterans Affairs benefits, claims, services and health care will be held February 15 at the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center. Health checks and screenings also will be available. CLEVELAND, Ohio - A free resource fair and listening session will be held February 15 by the Northeast Ohio Veterans Affairs (VA) Healthcare System for anyone seeking information regarding VA health care, benefits, claims and more. The event will be held from 3-7 p.m. in the recreation hall of the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, 10701 East Boulevard, in Cleveland. Additionally, VA health care providers will be available to offer veterans blood pressure checks, flu shots and screenings for oral cancer and Hepatitis C.  Programs and services covered during the session include the Community Resource and Referral Center, Cuyahoga County Veterans Service Commission, crisis intervention, homeless women veterans, HUD-VASH, dental, peer support counselors, pharmacy, prosthetics, Red Cross of Northeast Ohio, transition and care management, women's health and the USO. Veterans interested in checking on their VA health care eligibility should bring their DD214 and a valid photo ID.
166 points by The Plain Dealer | Health care Greater Cleveland Healthcare Medicine Cuyahoga County Ohio Cuyahoga River Akron Ohio Lakewood Ohio
CLE Chatter: New lakefront group surfaces with big ambition (and other noteworthy tidbits from our town)
Making waves: The Green Ribbon Coalition has quietly surfaced as a new advocacy organization promoting a more accessible and connected lakefront along Lake Erie that goes beyond Cleveland's borders. The organization is the product of a merger between three groups once focused on the lakefront: The Cleveland Waterfront Coalition, Cleveland Lakefront Parks Conservancy and The Cleveland Lakefront Development Corp. The... Making waves: The Green Ribbon Coalition has quietly surfaced as a new advocacy organization promoting a more accessible and connected lakefront along Lake Erie that goes beyond Cleveland's borders. The organization is the product of a merger between three groups once focused on the lakefront: The Cleveland Waterfront Coalition, Cleveland Lakefront Parks Conservancy and The Cleveland Lakefront Development Corp. The new group, which was formalized last year, takes it name from the nascent Lakefront Ribbon of Green Coalition, which was formed by big-idea guy Dick Clough, an advertising and marketing professional and waterfront activist. Cough serves as executive board chairman of the new group. He told me he'd like to see less development along our shores and more green space. "We don't want  an edifice complex," he said with a laugh, referring to the city's history of building structures on the lakefront - stadiums, power plants, condos and an airport. "We want a better balance between commercial and lakefront access." The group is working on creating a master database of every lakefront plan, past and present, to provide a reference point for the future. The group also has launched a project to measure trail, green and commercial space along the lakefront to provide facts and figures for planning. Clough envisions a coastal bike trail connecting Cuyahoga County and the Lake County shoreline. He gives high marks to Metroparks' stewardship of the city's lakefront because the park system is improving connectivity. The Green Ribbon Coalition is seeking citizen input through a survey at its website to help guide its advocacy. Clough is also willing to field questions and comments at [email protected] Another housing court loss: In addition to the recent loss of Cleveland Housing Court Judge Raymond Pianka, who died unexpected last month, the housing court has lost another legendary judge. William Corrigan, who was Pianka's predecessor and retired from the bench in 1995, died Feb. 1, at age 93. Corrigan helped expand the court's outreach programs for the poor and he aggressively prosecuted neglectful landlords, a legacy upon which Pianka dramatically built. "Corrigan went out of his way to ensure the system of eviction was as compassionate as it could be," said former Ohio State Representative Mike Foley, who was Corrigan's bailiff for six years. "He made sure that people losing their home knew where they could go to get help." Outside of court, Corrigan, who became a Catholic Deacon, was a fixture on the city's near West Side, where he was known for his anti-war and social-justice causes. A memorial service for Pianka is Feb. 11, at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in Cleveland. A memorial service for Corrigan is Feb. 18, at Cleveland's St. Colman Church. Missing campaign managers: Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson and Councilman Jeffrey Johnson are the two major candidates among many who share an ambition to be the city's next mayor. And neither one has a campaign manager at the moment. With the primary many months away in September, it's no surprise they are not ready to pay someone. Jackson said he'll likely name Blaine Griffin, director of the Community Relations Board. Griffin, a close ally of the mayor's, knows the city streets better than anyone and ran Jackson's re-election campaign in 2013. Johnson said he's considering several people and hopes to name someone by March 1. Ohio ACLU joins immigration-ban battle: The American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio is after directives related to President Trump's recent executive order on immigration, which temporally bars people from seven predominantly Muslim countries from entering the U.S.. On Thursday, the Ohio ACLU joined other ACLU branches from states that fall under the jurisdiction of the Chicago office of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection to request numerous public records. (It was part of a larger coordinated effort by 50 ACLU affiliates.) "We are trying to see how the order is being interpreted and executed on the ground at airports in Ohio," Ohio ACLU staff attorney Elizabeth Bonham said, noting the reports of widespread confusion at some airports. Ohioans shouldn't hold their breath for records. The federal government  - regardless of who sits in the White House - isn't known for its speed in responding to such requests. Rising Scott: Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson said he is planning to bring more accountability to city departments by creating in his office a quality-control and performance-management unit. He said he will hire three auditors for the unit, which incorporates the Department of Public Utilities' "Citistat" office, which uses data analysis to measure productivity and deploy city resources. Jackson said he will likely place former city councilwoman Sabra Pierce Scott in charge of the unit. Jackson hired her in July 2014 as a "deputy program manager" in "Citistat," just months after she completed a federal sentence for public corruption. Westlake homecoming: Former Cuyahoga County Clerk of Courts Andrea Rocco is looking to return to the city of Westlake' payroll. Rocco is running to be the suburb's next law director. Rocco was the city's prosecutor and assistant law director for years before being appointed in 2013 to county clerk of courts by then-County Executive Ed FitzGerald. She lost her clerk job when Executive Armond Budish took office and appointed Nailah Byrd to the post in 2015. At the moment, Rocco has one challenger, attorney Michael P. Maloney. Westlake's incumbent law director, John Wheeler, is not seeking another term. In this new semi-regular column, I hope to offer news tidbits, complaints, shout-outs and the occasional poke in the eye. Sometimes the column will appear as a video or a slideshow. Got a tip or comment, send me an email at [email protected]  On Twitter: @marknaymik
273 points by The Plain Dealer | Frank G. Jackson Cuyahoga County Ohio Board of directors American Civil Liberties Union Judge Cuyahoga River
One dead in dirt bike crash in Cleveland's Kinsman neighborhood
The dirt bike rider, a male who appeared to be in his teens, was struck by a vehicle. He died at University Hospitals, Cleveland police said. CLEVELAND, Ohio - One person is dead Monday night following a crash involving a dirt bike on Cleveland's East Side, police said. The crash happened about 7 p.m. near the intersection of East 93rd and Raymond Avenue, north of Union Avenue in the city's Kinsman neighborhood, Cleveland police spokeswoman Sgt. Jennifer Ciaccia said. The dirt bike rider, a male who appeared to be in his teens, was struck by a vehicle. The dirt bike rider was taken to University Hospitals by paramedics, where he died, Ciaccia said. The victim will be publicly identified by the Cuyahoga County Medical Examiner's Office once his family is notified. The crash, which was not a hit-and-run, caused East 93rd Street to close in both directions while police processed the scene, Ciaccia said. The road had not reopened as of 9 p.m. This post will be updated if additional details about the crash are released Monday night. If you'd like to comment on this post, please visit the cleveland.com crime and courts comments section. 
1168 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio English-language films Cleveland Manhattan Greater Cleveland New York City Road Cuyahoga River
Talk it Out: What can be done about heroin, fentanyl wreaking havoc on Cuyahoga County?
The opiate epidemic in Cuyahoga County has continued to claim lives at an overwhelming clip. How can we best address the opiate epidemic? Join us today for a discussion on the topic. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Cuyahoga County once again set a grim record for most opiate-related deaths in 2016. The death-rate for heroin, fentanyl and other opiate deaths have skyrocketed from 64 in 2011 to at least 517 in 2016, according to the Cuyahoga County Medical Examiner. That number could increase as the medical examiner has not yet published its final report on exactly how many deaths have been attributed to opiates. But the county more than doubled the number of deaths in 2015, the worst on record at the time. And the deaths keep happening at a breakneck pace. There were at least 46 heroin and fentanyl deaths in January. That number could grow to 57 after toxicology tests are finalized, according to the medical examiner. Fourteen people died this weekend, according to the medical examiner. Some 24 total have died from the drugs in the first five days of the month, bringing the total for 2017 to at least 70.  Public officials, the medical community and others have targeted the problem for several years now, labeling the crisis an epidemic. But the resources put forward have seemingly done little stem the problem. Cleveland.com last year chronicled the dozens of victims of heroin and fentanyl and the crushing toll it took on their families.  The series, along with the hard statistics, show no one demographic is safe from the drugs. Heroin and fentanyl overdose victims live across Cuyahoga County, in the wealthier suburbs and in the economically stressed parts of the inner-city. Ages range from late teens into people in their late 60s.  What can be done to stem the tide of heroin and fentanyl deaths in Northeast Ohio and the state? Is it a funding issue? Do more beds need to be made available for addicts seeking treatment? Does law enforcement need to prioritize targeting those who deal the deadly drugs? Join us today from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. for a civil, constructive conversation in the comments section below about the opiate crisis in Northeast Ohio and how it can be addressed. Comments will be reviewed by a moderator before they are published.  In our Talk it Out pre-curated conversation, comments are published after they are reviewed -- promptly -- to ensure they adhere to our community rules, which prohibit indecent, hateful, abusive or harassing comments, personal attacks, vulgar nicknames, personal information including telephone numbers and addresses, email addresses belonging to others, anything inciting criminal behavior and copyrighted material for which you do not own the rights.   Comments that are not on the topic of this discussion will not be published. Criticism is fine, as long as it is respectful. We seek a robust and courteous discussion. 
100 points by The Plain Dealer | Morphine Greater Cleveland Opioid Cuyahoga County Ohio Cuyahoga River Cleveland Fentanyl Ohio
Hundreds march through downtown Cleveland in opposition to Trump's travel ban
Hundreds of marchers took to Cleveland streets on Friday in protest of President Donald Trump's travel ban against immigrants and refugees from seven countries in the Middle East and Africa. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Hundreds of marchers took to Cleveland streets Friday to protest President Donald Trump's travel ban affecting people from seven predominantly Muslim countries. The protest began at 4 p.m. in Ohio City's Market Square and made its way across the Detroit-Superior Bridge. Marchers stopped at the Carl B. Stokes U.S. Courthouse before reaching their final destination of Cleveland City Hall, where organizers spoke out against Trump's immigration order and called for Cleveland to become a sanctuary city. Trump's executive order last week has spawned protests and legal challenges across the country. Late Friday, a federal judge in Seattle temporarily blocked the ban, the Associated Press reported.  Protesters in Cleveland carried signs and chanted slogans that welcomed immigrants and condemned the ban. "Cleveland loves refugees," some sang, while others shouted "no hate, no fear, refugees are welcome here." Chrissy Stonebraker-Martinez, co-director of the Interreligious Task Force on Central America and Colombia, said she and other representatives of local advocacy groups helped organize the protest. She named the Lorain Ohio Immigrant Rights Association, Peace in the Hood, Jobs with Justice, Council on American-Islamic Relations and Jewish Voices for Peace as some of the collaborators. "People from Cleveland, from Cuyahoga County, from Northeast Ohio are showing up and that feels really good because people are defending their home. And we want to open our homes to people who are seeking refuge and who also want to be part of our community," Stonebraker-Martinez told cleveland.com. She said she and other marchers are calling for Cleveland to be a sanctuary city, where local authorities opt not to cooperate with federal officials to enforce immigration laws. "And not just Cleveland -- our country, our county, our state. We want the United States to be a place of welcome," Stonebraker-Martinez said. A police escort continued to block off roads as the group moved up West 25th Street, across the bridge and deeper into downtown. Lakeside Avenue in front of city hall remained blocked off until about 6:30 p.m., when the demonstration concluded. While the crowd snarled traffic at times, it also drew out and cheers from some passing motorists. Marchers' signs ranged from pointed political statements about Trump to general calls for  "love not hate" and "peace." One echoed the Statue of Liberty: "Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses."  Demonstrator Kristina Alaei said she joined the protest because Trump's ban hit close to home. Her husband is Iranian and her mother-in-law is in Northeast Ohio on a green card from Iran. "It's been really scary for them," Alaei said. "They're wonderful people and it breaks my heart to hear (others) say 'We're going to ban them from coming here' or 'We're going to stop immigration from there' ."
246 points by The Plain Dealer | Immigration Cuyahoga County Ohio Cleveland Protest Greater Cleveland Cuyahoga River Donald Trump Akron Ohio
Charges accuse Parma police officer of lying to state gambling officials at Jack Casino
Michael Yonek has been indicted on charges of obstructing official business and identity fraud. PARMA, Ohio -- A Parma police officer was indicted on criminal charges after officials from the Ohio Casino Control Commission said he lied to agents. Michael Yonek, 42, was charged Thursday with obstructing official business and identity fraud, according to court documents.  The charges are related to an incident that happened Nov. 18, 2016 at Jack Casino in Cleveland, according to records.  Investigators said that Yonek gave agents a fake name for a woman that he said was his girlfriend after the woman won money at the casino. The indictment does not say why agents questioned Yonek and his girlfriend. The woman, whose name is included in court documents, has not been charged with a crime as of Friday.  Cleveland.com has requested a copy of Yonek's personnel file from Parma police.  Yonek is set to be arraigned in Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Court Feb. 16. Parma police Capt. Kevin Riley confirmed Yonek is an officer with the department. He has been placed on unpaid administrative suspension, Riley said. If you'd like to comment on this story, visit Friday's crime and courts comments section.
15 points by The Plain Dealer | Fraud Jury Cuyahoga County Ohio Police Cuyahoga River Parma Ohio Identity theft Ohio
Find Cuyahoga County home sales, other property transfers for January
The cleveland.com database of Cuyahoga County home sales and other property transfers has been updated with transactions for January. Search the database to find home sales by street, address or town. CLEVELAND, Ohio - The cleveland.com database of recent Cuyahoga County home sales and other property transfers has been updated with transactions for January. Search the database at this link to find home sales in your neighborhood and across the county. The database includes transfers on record from the Cuyahoga County Fiscal Office since January 2007. Also: Median home sales prices for each Cuyahoga County town, 2007 - 2016 Median home sales prices for each Cleveland neighborhood, 2007 - 2016 Property tax rates for each community in the Greater Cleveland/Akron area Ohio's highest overall property tax rates Ohio's highest school property tax rates Most expensive homes sold in Cuyahoga County in 2016 17 Cleveland Cleveland homes that sold for at least $380,000 in 2016 Data Central home for data on a variety of topics from the Northeast Ohio Media Group In-depth real estate coverage from Plain Dealer real estate reporter Michelle Jarboe
3 points by The Plain Dealer | Greater Cleveland Cuyahoga County Ohio Lakewood Ohio Cuyahoga River Akron Ohio Cleveland Lake Erie Linndale Ohio
Mayors of Ohio's largest cities team up to voice concerns at the Statehouse
Mayors of Ohio's 30 largest cities have created the Ohio Mayors Alliance to better voice their concerns at the Ohio Statehouse. COLUMBUS, Ohio -- The mayors of Ohio's 30 largest cities are banding together to better voice their concerns and needs to a state legislature they say has become increasingly anti-city. The Ohio Mayors Alliance wants to make sure Ohio's cities have a say in the next two-year state budget and that the next gubernatorial candidates consider urban issues as they're shaping their campaigns.  Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley said the rhetoric coming out of Columbus often suggests cities are welfare dependents and dependent on the state, but cities give more to the state than they receive. "The state can't do anything for Ohio including our wonderful rural areas without the jobs that are created in cities," Cranley said in a Friday news conference announcing the group's formation. Impact 2016: Where the cuts hurt the most Cleveland is the only one of Ohio's eight largest cities that hadn't officially signed on as of Friday. Northeast Ohio members include Akron, Cleveland Heights, Cuyahoga Falls, Elyria, Euclid, Lakewood, Parma and Warren. The alliance is bipartisan -- 20 Democrats and 10 Republicans -- and has been in the works for more than a year, Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley said. Whaley said meetings with legislative leaders and Gov. John Kasich staffers earlier this week were well received. Opioid abuse epidemic and infrastructure needs will be priorities for the group, and formal positions will require a two-thirds vote.  The group plans to weigh in during state budget deliberations during the first half of 2017. Whaley said city mayors haven't voiced their opinions enough over the past six years of budgets, which have cut funding for local governments. Cranley said local governments have been under attack at the GOP-controlled Statehouse for years.  "We're seeing the job creation happening in cities and yet an attitude in Columbus that's been very anti-local government and very anti-city and that's not good for Ohio," Cranley said.
11 points by The Plain Dealer | Ohio Greater Cleveland Cleveland Cuyahoga County Ohio Akron Ohio Cuyahoga River Cuyahoga Falls Ohio Cities in Ohio
See transformation of Akron's Lock 4 park through lighting, landscaping, music (video)
The Ohio & Erie Canalway Coalition on Thursday showed off the new amenities the group is implementing at Lock 4 park as part of a $5 million Reimagining the Civic Commons grant. Watch video AKRON, Ohio - Ahead of this weekend's Downtown Akron Harvest Fest, the Ohio & Erie Canalway Coalition unveiled new year-round, multi-colored lighting at Akron's Lock 4 park and over the Route 59 bridge that brings the Towpath Trail into downtown Akron. Now, new jewel-tone LED lighting at Lock 4 shifts colors, reflecting off the Ohio & Erie Canal as it cascades over small waterfalls, and makes the old brick buildings glow with hues that deepen as darkness falls. Bright white lights twinkle from trees planted around the perimeter. For this weekend's festival, Adirondack chairs, beer garden-style tables and moveable furniture will be added to allow Akronites to relax and toast s'mores at open fire pits, while local vendors serve food and spirits. A movie will play on the side of the Civic Theatre. The Lock 4 project is one of the first the Canalway Coalition has implemented through its $5 million Reimagining the Civic Commons grant. A block away, the Route 59 bridge is also lit in vivid hues programmed to change color, creating waves and dappled effects. New cedar benches line the bridge, side-by-side with steel planters filled with colorful vegetation and signs to the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, the Akron Art Museum and other areas of interest. It's all designed to make the space more inviting for downtown residents, workers, visitors and Towpath Trail users. "It's like an oasis," said Canalway Coalition President Dan Rice. "That's going to be our challenge. People are going to want to see more." To design the urban park, the Canalway Coalition is working with Groundswell Design Group, based in Philadelphia. Groundswell has led work on similar projects, designing spaces to be enjoyed in winter , along waterways and in warmer seasons. "We just gave Akron all the ingredients to make a great cake," said Groundswell president David Fierabend. Lock 4 will also offer outdoor games, such as giant Jenga, concrete ping-pong and cornhole. "People can come down here during the day and have a coffee and blow off steam," he said. Akron was selected for the grant to enable the Canalway Coalition to come up with effective ways to revitalize and connect public spaces along the Towpath Trail that bring together people from different backgrounds. The organization has reached out to the community over the past year to gather input from residents to assist in that process. Many additional projects are planned for the next three years along the Towpath Trail from downtown Akron to Summit Lake. Many of the improvements planned for the park will be showcased this weekend at the Harvest Festival. Harvest Fest to kick off public space improvements in downtown Akron
68 points by The Plain Dealer | Ohio and Erie Canal Akron Ohio Ohio Cuyahoga Valley National Park Erie Canal Cuyahoga River Light-emitting diode Lighting
Legacies of Carl and Louis Stokes to be honored in 2017
The legacies of Carl and Louis Stokes will be commemorated in a series of events in 2017 - the 50th anniversary of Carl Stokes' election as the first black mayor of a major city in 1967. CLEVELAND, Ohio - A host of Cleveland institutions will honor Carl and Louis Stokes in a series of events in 2017, the 50th anniversary of Carl Stokes' election as mayor of Cleveland. The yearlong series will honor Stokes and his brother, U.S. Rep. Louis Stokes. It will build on their legacy of leadership, advocacy and action, said Cuyahoga Community College President Alex Johnson in a statement. "Stokes: Honoring the Past, Inspiring the Future" includes more than 60 community partners; it will be announced today during a City Club event examining how Mayor Stokes' response to the Cuyahoga River fire in 1969 helped launch an environmental movement. The commemoration will include music and theater performances, museum exhibits, academic conferences and an oral history project. A calendar of events will be released in January. For more information visit stokes50cle.com. Events will seek to use history as a guide for continued social and economic development in Greater Cleveland and inspire a new generation of community leaders, officials said. The commemoration is being led by the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Humanities Center at Tri-C, the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage, Western Reserve Historical Society, Greater Cleveland Partnership, the Cleveland Foundation and The City Club of Cleveland. "The accomplishments of Mayor Stokes and Congressman Stokes advanced Cleveland and the nation, and their influence continues to resonate," Johnson said in a statement. "Their vision serves as a guide for a vibrant and prosperous future in our city." Carl Stokes, who died in 1996,  overturned racial barriers in 1967 while becoming the first elected black mayor of a major American city. He served two terms while advancing an agenda that still serves as a foundation for Cleveland. Louis Stokes, who died in 2015, turned to politics after making a profound impact on the civil rights movement as a lawyer. He won election as Ohio's first black congressman in 1968 and served 30 years in the U.S. House of Representatives. Goals of the Stokes initiative include: Celebrating the historical accomplishments of Carl and Louis Stokes while reflecting on their impact on political access and civil rights. Considering current challenges related to social justice and equality and identifying strategies to resolve them through purposeful research, productive discussion and strategic planning. Inspiring a new generation to continue the Stokes legacy and create a road map for civic engagement. Creating lasting tributes as a reminder of the past and our commitment to a better future. Stokes: Honoring the Past, Inspiring the Future is supported by gifts from many individuals and organizations. More than 20 highly prominent community, government and business leaders chair the initiative.
58 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Greater Cleveland Akron Ohio Ohio United States House of Representatives Downtown Cleveland Cuyahoga River Cuyahoga Falls Ohio
Let it snow! Photos of Northeast Ohio snowfalls -- and a few storms -- over the years (vintage photos)
A vintage photo gallery featuring some of cleveland.com and the Cleveland Plain Dealer's best snow pictures. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Winter is coming, Cleveland. The first significant snowfall of the year is expected this weekend, likely ending the period of unseasonably warm temperatures of the last several weeks. This being Northeast Ohio, we're all used to seeing that white stuff blanket the land as cold weather approaches.  Snowstorms have hit Cleveland every year for as long as anyone can remember, and cleveland.com and Cleveland Plain Dealer photographers have always been there to document them. With this year's first snowfall possibly hitting us this weekend, we thought now might be a good time to sift through our photo archives and come up with some of the best snow pictures we've printed through the years. The pictures in the gallery at the top of this post date back decades, and include blizzards and winter storms severe enough to leave motorist stranded on the highway. But the images also include the lighter side of winter, with children sledding and making snowman. Scroll through the gallery above to see some of our best vintage snow pictures.
36 points by The Plain Dealer | Cleveland Greater Cleveland Blizzard George Voinovich Cuyahoga River Cleveland Cavaliers The Plain Dealer Winter storm
Man shot dead outside convenience store on Cleveland's West Side
A 20-year-old man was shot dead Wednesday in the parking lot of a Cleveland convenience store. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A man was shot dead late Wednesday outside a convenience store in the city's Cudell neighborhood. The shooting happened about 8:20 p.m. in the parking lot outside Convenient Food Mart in the 9100 block of Denison Avenue. A 20-year-old man was talking with someone in a red SUV. The man ran off before the SUV drove away, police said. Both the man and the SUV returned to the parking lot a short time later. Someone inside the SUV opened fire on the man before it drove off. Officers found the man on the ground in the parking lot with a gunshot to his chest. He was taken to MetroHealth Medical Center, where he died. The Cuyahoga County Medical Examiner will release the man's name once his family is notified.  The shooting is the city's 114th homicide of the year.  To comment on this story, please visit out crime and courts comments page.
45 points by The Plain Dealer | Cleveland Convenience Convenience store Cuyahoga County Ohio MetroHealth Greater Cleveland Cuyahoga River English-language films
Dick's Sporting Goods hiring 190 seasonal workers at 10 Northeast Ohio stores
Dick's Sporting Goods, which is opening its stores from 6 p.m. to 2 a.m. on Thanksgiving and from 5 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Black Friday, said seasonal employees will receive competitive pay and store discounts. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Dick's Sporting Goods is hiring about 190 temporary part-time workers at 10 of its stores in Northeast Ohio. Dick's said it is looking for exceptional applicants who are passionate about sports or the outdoors to join its stores in: Bainbridge Shopping Center in Aurora; The Plaza at Chapel Hill in Cuyahoga Falls; Midway Market Square in Elyria; Legacy Village in Lyndhurst; Great Lakes Mall in Mentor; Market Square at Montrose in Fairlawn; Great Northern Mall in North Olmsted; The Shoppes at Parma; SouthPark Mall in Strongsville; and Crocker Park in Westlake. "Ideal candidates will draw on their personal experiences and in-depth knowledge to guide, inform, equip and inspire our customers," Dick's said in a written announcement. Dick's, which is opening its stores from 6 p.m. to 2 a.m. on Thanksgiving and from 5 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Black Friday, said seasonal employees will receive competitive pay and store discounts. More information can be found at dickssportinggoods.jobs Dicks Sporting Goods Inc., founded in 1948 and based in Pittsburgh, is one of the nation's largest sporting goods retailers, with an extensive assortment of sports equipment, clothing, footwear, and accessories. As of Oct. 29, Dick's had more than 675 stores in the U.S, as well as e-commerce sales via its Dicks.com site.
13 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Ohio Cities in Ohio Greater Cleveland Cuyahoga River Shopping mall Cuyahoga Falls Ohio Pittsburgh
Legionnaires' disease in Lake County; infant mortality rate up in Ohio; Brookpark official accused of shoplifting: Overnight News Links
Also, state crime lab finishes testing nearly 5,000 older Cuyahoga County rape kits; Clevelanders react to city's decision to permanently ban buses from Public Square; Oberlin College fires professor who published anti-Semitic posts on Facebook Featured stories One dead, 10 sickened in Lake County Legionnaires' disease outbreak (cleveland.com) Infant mortality rate jumps in Ohio, Cuyahoga County, racial gap continues to widen (cleveland.com) Brook Park councilwoman charged with shoplifting at Target (cleveland.com) Crime Akron man receives one-year sentence for fatally shooting robbery suspect (cleveland.com) Stepmother, witnesses paint bleak picture of barbershop shooter's childhood (cleveland.com) Cleveland brothers convicted in gang shooting remain defiant during sentencing (cleveland.com) Cleveland police search for Subway armed robbery suspects (cleveland.com) Drug-dealing owner of defunct downtown Cleveland strip club sentenced (cleveland.com) Akron pizza delivery driver assaulted, threatened in robbery (cleveland.com) Cleveland man accidentally shot while group mourned friend's fatal shooting (cleveland.com) Man shot, killed in Cleveland's Edgewater neighborhood identified (cleveland.com) Lorain couple's cat put down after being shot in back (cleveland.com) Twinsburg: babysitter arrested for fraud, forgery (WJW Channel 8) Police: Elyria man tied up and robbed at gunpoint (Elyria Chronicle-Telegram) Father of unsupervised Sandusky baby charged with misdemeanor (Sandusky Register) Cleveland / Cuyahoga County State crime lab finishes testing nearly 5,000 older Cuyahoga County rape kits (cleveland.com) Clevelanders react to city's decision to permanently ban buses from Public Square (cleveland.com)  Judge John Russo re-elected Cuyahoga County administrative judge (cleveland.com) Cuyahoga County inmates landing post-release jobs after culinary program debut (cleveland.com) Local news East Shaker Heights High reverses discipline of student after political social media posts, ACLU says (cleveland.com) Kent State basketball players honor unity, diversity during national anthem (cleveland.com) Hathaway Brown named best private high school in Ohio: See the top 5 (cleveland.com) 'Lil John' Rinaldi closing jewelry store in Solon (cleveland.com) Local news West Oberlin College fires professor who published anti-Semitic posts on Facebook (cleveland.com) Lorain police officer suspended after handling of stabbing arrest (cleveland.com) Red Cross will have free smoke alarms Saturday in Olmsted Township (cleveland.com) Akron / Canton area Quotes from 7 Akron anti-Trump protesters at Highland Square rally (cleveland.com) 84-year-old woman killed in Cuyahoga Falls crash (Akron Beacon Journal) State Ohio Democrats want Steve Bannon fired as Donald Trump's White House adviser (cleveland.com) In the search for a new DNC leader, Ohio Democratic Party Chairman David Pepper wants 'conversation' - not coronation (cleveland.com) Drug makers line pockets of Ohio politicians (WKYC Channel 3) Suspect accused of attempting to join ISIL may be mentally ill, documents say (10tv.com) Pedestrian dies after being struck by vehicle in south Columbus (10tv.com)
2 points by The Plain Dealer | Greater Cleveland Cuyahoga County Ohio Ohio Akron Ohio Cuyahoga River Summit County Ohio Cleveland Lorain County Ohio
Army Corps of Engineers' serially mistaken Cuyahoga River dredge approach: editorial
The Army Corps' shortsighted and economically damaging position on Cuyahoga River dredge keeps driving up taxpayer costs – this week forcing state and local officials to file a second lawsuit as part of an ongoing federal court battle, writes the editorial board. The bureaucratic mulishness of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in refusing to dredge the Cuyahoga River -- as required not just by congressional directives but also by the needs of major Cleveland employers who rely on the river for essential cargo -- must end.   The Corps' shortsighted and economically damaging position keeps driving up taxpayer costs - this week forcing Ohio and Cleveland port officials to file a second lawsuit as part of an ongoing federal court battle in Cleveland. Ohio again sues Army Corps of Engineers over dredging of Cuyahoga River shipping channel About our editorials Editorials express the view of the editorial board of cleveland.com and The Plain Dealer -- the senior leadership and editorial-writing staff. As is traditional, editorials are unsigned and intended to be seen as the voice of the news organization. * Talk about the topic of this editorial in the comments below. * Send a letter to the editor, which will be considered for print publication. * Email general questions or comments about the editorial board to Elizabeth Sullivan, opinion director for cleveland.com. // $('.floatingSeries').css({'font-family':'arial,helvetica,sans-serif','font-size':'14px','line-height':'20px','color':'#333333','width':'255px','margin':'10px','margin-right':'0px','float':'right','border-bottom-color':'#dadada','border-bottom-style':'solid','border-bottom-width':'1px','padding-bottom':'2px'});$('.floatingSeries h3').css({'text-transform':'uppercase','color':'#363636','font-size':'30px','line-height':'28px','padding-bottom':'7px','border-bottom-color':'#363636','border-bottom-style':'solid','border-bottom-width':'4px'}); $('.floatingSeries ul').css({'list-style-type':'none','list-style-position':'outside','list-style-image':'none','margin':'0px','padding':'0px'});$('.floatingSeries li').css({'font-family':'arial,helvetica,sans-serif','font-size':'14px','font-weight':'normal','color':'#333333','font-weight':'bold','line-height':'20px','border-top-width':'1px','border-top-style':'solid','border-top-color':'#cccccc','margin':'0px','margin-top':'6px','margin-bottom':'6px','padding':'0px','padding-top':'6px','padding-bottom':'4px','color':'#333333','text-decoration':'none'});$('.floatingSeries a:link').css('color','#333333');$('.floatingSeries h3').css('margin-bottom','2px'); // ]]> Fortunately, U.S. District Judge Donald Nugent signaled in a Sept. 12 order that he's prepared to consolidate claims as needed to speed this case to a prompt conclusion. Good. The Corps' refusal to dredge the river already has had economic consequences. Throughout August and so far in September, ships "are light loading by nearly 20%" and "only able to fully traverse the Upper Cuyahoga Navigation Channel by plowing their keels through the shoaled sediments in portions of the Channel," the lawsuit states. So much for the Corps' assertion that low rains and and high lake levels had eliminated the need to dredge, at least so far this year. The truth is that the Corps refuses to dredge because it hasn't been able to strong-arm Ohio into allowing it to dump tainted river dredge directly into Lake Erie to save money on containing PCBs and other potentially carcinogenic toxins. "The Corps' position again forces Ohio into a Catch-22 where it must choose between two unjust options," states Monday's lawsuit: "either 1) submitting to the Corps' unlawful demand for money [to pay for safer dredge-disposal options]. . . or 2) passively accepting the severe economic distress that will befall local industry, the Port, the City of Cleveland, and the State of Ohio when the Corps allows the Cleveland Harbor to become unnavigable." This is so wrong it's shocking that the White House hasn't stepped in to overrule. March: Army Corps to Cleveland - Drop dead: editorial The river channel is "the lifeline for one of the most productive steel mills in the world and a major engine of the Cleveland and Ohio economies," said officials of ArcelorMittal USA's Cleveland steel mill last year. The Corps of Engineers has been serially wrong in threatening to throttle that lifeline to get its way on dredge disposal. If it, or its federal bosses, don't recognize that soon, the courts may -- and, we hope, will -- provide the needed course correction. Have something to say about this topic? Use the comments to share your thoughts, and stay informed when readers reply to your comments by using the Notification Settings (in blue) just below.
87 points by The Plain Dealer | Lake Erie Akron Ohio Ohio Greater Cleveland Cuyahoga River Cuyahoga County Ohio Great Lakes George Voinovich
Pregnant woman shot on East Side; lawmaker focuses on toy guns; men accused of killing robbery witness: Overnight News Links
Also, cancer-causing pollutant made famous by Erin Brockovich found in NE Ohio drinking water; Akron police search for shooter in fatal 2015 gas station shootout; Meijer to move ahed in Mentor once Kmart closes Featured stories Pregnant woman shot on Cleveland's East Side (WEWS Channel 5) Ohio lawmaker asks parents to get rid of real-looking toy guns (cleveland.com) Cleveland men charged with executing 17-year-old girl who witnessed bank robbery (cleveland.com) Crime Akron police search for shooter in fatal 2015 gas station shootout (cleveland.com) Perry Township man pleads guilty to murder in death of 1-year-old boy (cleveland.com) Elyria woman charged after suspected overdose with grandson in truck (Elyria Chronicle-Telegram) Man tries to escape from jail through cell's food slot (WEWS Channel 5) Authorities search for West Side Cleveland bank robber (cleveland.com) Northfield Fire District vandals wrote profanity, urinated on equipment (WKYC Channel 3) Man shot outside convenience store in Cleveland's Glenville neighborhood (cleveland.com) Cleveland man 'attacked anyone within striking distance' in violent West Side bar fight, records say (cleveland.com) Cleveland man accused of shooting girlfriend over cellphone spent three years in prison for 2001 shooting (cleveland.com) Authorities arrest man accused of taking child while mother was showering (WOIO Channel 19) Man admits he broke into elderly woman's home while in the nude (Canton Repository) Cleveland / Cuyahoga County Cancer-causing pollutant made famous by Erin Brockovich found in NE Ohio drinking water (cleveland.com) Cleveland Republican National Convention host committee exceeded $64 million fundraising goal, new filing shows (cleveland.com) UH Bikes rolls out 250 bikes in Cleveland for official bike sharing launch (cleveland.com) Cleveland listed as one of the 'Best Places to Live in the U.S.' by Time Out (cleveland.com) Collisions with deer on roads shoot up in Northeast Ohio (cleveland.com) Brecksville-Broadview Heights schools rank # 8 in Ohio on state report cards; North Royalton, Strongsville schools rank #10, #13 in Cuyahoga County (cleveland.com) Cats, kittens take over Cleveland neighborhood (WEWS Channel 5) Local news East Child dies after being struck by car in Chardon (News-Herald) AACS district sued in case of bus driver accused of sexually abusing children (Ashtabula Star Beacon) Meijer to move ahed in Mentor once Kmart closes (News-Herald)  Local news West Rocky River Montessori school accused of kicking out child with autism settles with U.S. Justice Department (cleveland.com) Parents say son spent 48 hours in Olmsted Falls restraint & seclusion room (WOIO Channel 19) Child struck by vehicle in Lorain (Lorain Morning Journal) Lakewood mayor, fire chief defend EMS response times since hospital's closure (cleveland.com) Parma man sues over arrest, prosecution for creating fake police department Facebook page (cleveland.com) Strongsville scraps I-71 slip ramp project after NOACA hesitates (cleveland.com) Strongsville school district sells Drake Elementary School property to resident with plans for senior living (cleveland.com) Akron / Canton area State Reince Priebus makes a mess in Ohio and upsets a top Republican whose help he can't afford to lose (cleveland.com) Ohio again sues Army Corps of Engineers over dredging of Cuyahoga River shipping channel (cleveland.com) Ohio's energy future cloudy at best, storms likely (video) (cleveland.com) Court records: Rape claims against teacher include several sites (Dayton Daily News)
-1 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Greater Cleveland Akron Ohio Ohio Cuyahoga River Lorain County Ohio WOIO Cuyahoga Valley National Park
Woman shot on front porch during Cleveland drive-by shooting dies
Belinda Hunter, 61, has been pronounced dead at MetroHealth after she was shot in the head in a drive-by Sunday night. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A Cleveland grandmother shot Sunday while sitting on her front porch has died. MetroHealth doctors pronounced 61-year-old Belinda Hunter dead Monday, police said. The Cuyahoga County Medical Examiner has not released her name. Hunter and a 27-year-old man were shot about 6:30 p.m. outside her home on Norwood Road between St. Clair and Superior avenues, police said. A large, blue, newer-model van drove by the house, and someone stuck a gun out of the window and started shooting, police said. A bullet struck Hunter in the head. The man was shot in the back and shoulder, police said. Someone drove him to St. Vincent Charity Hospital. A man flagged down a Cleveland police car on Superior Avenue and told them about the shooting on Norwood Avenue. Officers went to the scene and found Hunter. They gave her emergency first aid until paramedics came and rushed her to MetroHealth. Police have not identified a suspect. Hunter's death brings the city's unofficial homicide tally this year to 80.  Previous: Three dead, four wounded in 12 hours in Cleveland To comment on this story, please visit Monday's comments section. 
-1 points by The Plain Dealer | Cleveland Death Cuyahoga County Ohio Akron Ohio First aid Greater Cleveland Cuyahoga River Lakewood Ohio
Maple Heights man shot, killed in Cleveland
Nakale Crosby, 18, was shot dead as he sat in a car on East 116th Street in Cleveland's Union-Miles Park neighborhood, police said. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- An 18-year-old Maple Heights man was shot dead in Cleveland Saturday evening, according to officials. Nakale Crosby died at Marymount Hospital, the Cuyahoga County Medical Examiner's Office said. Crosby was sitting inside a car at East 116th Street and Putnam Avenue about 5:30 p.m. Witnesses told police they heard several gunshots, then went outside and found Crosby had been shot in the car, police said. Someone drove Crosby to Marymount Hospital, where he was later pronounced dead. Detectives continue to investigate. Crosby was one of three people killed and four wounded in Cleveland shootings Saturday afternoon and early Sunday morning. To comment on this story, please visit Saturday's crime and courts comments page.
2203 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Bedford Ohio Greater Cleveland Cleveland Saturday Maple Heights Ohio Lakewood Ohio Cuyahoga River
Man killed in motorcycle crash in Cleveland's Central neighborhood
The 50-year-old man was pronounced dead Saturday morning at MetroHealth, police said. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A man was killed Saturday morning in a motorcycle crash on Cleveland's East Side, police said. The crash occurred at the intersection of Grand Avenue and Kinsman Road in Cleveland's Central neighborhood, Cleveland police spokeswoman Sgt. Jennifer Ciaccia said. The motorcyclist, a 50-year-old man, was speeding eastbound on Kinsman Road on a 2006 Kawasaki motorcycle, Ciaccia said. A 49-year-old woman was driving a 2013 Ford vehicle westbound on Kinsman Road and took a left turn at Grand Avenue. The speeding motorcyclist crashed into the woman's vehicle, and he was thrown from the motorcycle, Ciaccia said. The motorcycle began spinning in the roadway and continued to hit the Ford. The motorcyclist was taken to MetroHealth, where he was pronounced dead, Ciaccia said. The Cuyahoga County Medical Examiner's Office will release the man's identity once his family is notified. If you'd like to comment on this post, please visit the cleveland.com crime and courts comments section.
110 points by The Plain Dealer | Cleveland Cuyahoga County Ohio Road Transport Motorcycle Greater Cleveland Intersection Cuyahoga River
Lake Erie, Cleveland area water issues focus of panel discussion Thursday
Three of the region's foremost experts on water in Northeast Ohio will lead a panel discussion Thursday to assess water quality in Lake Erie, the Cuyahoga River and the surrounding network of streams, ponds and marshes. FAIRVIEW PARK, Ohio - Three of the region's foremost experts on water in Northeast Ohio will lead a panel discussion Thursday to assess water quality in Lake Erie, the Cuyahoga River and the surrounding network of streams, ponds and marshes. The free event will be held from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Fairview Park Branch of the Cuyahoga County Public Library, 21255 Lorain Road, Fairview Park. This reporter will be the moderator. It is open to the public. The panelists are Kyle Dreyfuss-Wells, deputy director of Watershed Programs at the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District; Jane Goodman, executive director of Cuyahoga River Restoration; and Jim White, director of Sustainable Infrastructure Programs at the Port of Cleveland. The sponsors of the event are the Case Western Reserve University Siegal Lifelong Learning Program, the League of Women Voters of Greater Cleveland, The Plain Dealer / Cleveland.com, and the Lakewood and Cuyahoga County library systems. The corporate sponsor is First Interstate Properties, Ltd. For years, all three of the panelists have had a vital role in improving and maintaining the quality of the water found in our greatest natural assets: Lake Erie, the Cuyahoga River and the surrounding waterways. Discussion topics expected to be raised at the event include: Progress reports on the Sewer District's two biggest undertakings: the $3 billion Project Clean Lake tunnel construction project, scheduled for completion in 2025, and the $42 million per year earmarked for dozens of stormwater projects across the region over the next five years; An update on the ongoing conflict between the Port of Cleveland, the Ohio EPA, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. To date, the Army Corps has declined to dredge the Cuyahoga River shipping channel, and insists on dumping the dredged sediment into the open lake. The EPA and Port maintain that the sediment is too contaminated to dump in the lake, and should be stored in shoreline containment facilities; And what about that two-square-mile toxic mass the Army Corps dumped nine miles offshore about 45 years ago, which the EPA fears is slowly migrating toward one of Cleveland's drinking water intake pipes? The status of restoration efforts at the Mentor Marsh, Cleveland Lakefront Nature Preserve and the Black River in Lorain to remove such invasive vegetation as phragmites, cattails, and Japanese knotweed, and the ongoing efforts to prevent Asian carp from invading the Great Lakes; The potential benefits from the imminent removal of the last two dams from the Cuyahoga River from Akron to Lake Erie; Readers who attend are welcome to pose questions to the panel or raise additional water-related topics of discussion, and to share their thoughts on the region's progress during the 45 years or so since the passage of the federal Clean Water Act. A good crowd of passionate people is expected.
45 points by The Plain Dealer | Ohio Greater Cleveland Cuyahoga River Cleveland Cuyahoga County Ohio Great Lakes Clean Water Act Lorain County Ohio
Akron police search for Labor Day burglary suspect
Akron police are looking for a person who may have stolen three guns from a home in a Labor Day burglary. AKRON, Ohio -- Akron police are asking for the public's help to identify a possible suspect in connection with a Labor Day burglary. The burglary took place between 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. on the 1100 block of Mount Vernon Avenue, near East Cuyahoga Falls Avenue, according to an Akron police news release sent Friday. The burglar forced open the house's front door and stole three guns, police said. A possible suspect in the burglary was caught on a residential surveillance camera. The man is estimated to be between 18 and 23 years old, has a goatee and tattoos on his arms and legs, police said. The burglar should be considered armed and dangerous, police said. Anyone with information about the suspect's identity and whereabouts is asked to contact Akron police at 330-375-2552. If you'd like to comment on this post, please visit the cleveland.com crime and courts comments section.
15 points by The Plain Dealer | Ohio Cuyahoga River Summit County Ohio Cuyahoga Valley National Park Greater Cleveland Theft Akron metropolitan area Cuyahoga Falls Ohio
Cuyahoga County begins program to help food stamp recipients find jobs
Cuyahoga County has begun a pilot program to help food stamp recipients find meaningful jobs. CLEVELAND, Ohio - Cuyahoga County has begun a pilot program to help food stamp recipients find meaningful jobs. County officials are working with a Seattle agency to help those in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) gain skills, training or experience to better their chances of obtaining regular employment. If successful, the program could be expanded statewide. "We want to develop a program that supports a county resident into a training program that is connected to a vacant job that an employer needs filled," said David Merriman, administrator of the county's Job and Family Services. The county has approved a $150,000 contract with the Seattle Jobs Initiative, an employment job center that was also selected by the federal government to oversee its SNAP to Skills program. In March 2015  the secretaries of Agriculture and Labor announced $165 million in grants to 10 states for the employment and training pilot program. Ohio was not chosen but State Sen. Sandra Williams, a Cleveland Democrat, led a measure to place $150,000 in the current budget for Cuyahoga County to develop a program to address the needs of food stamp recipients, Merriman said. County officials chose the Seattle agency after talking to officials operating a program at Hennepen County, Minnesota, with the aid of the Seattle Jobs Initiative, Merriman said. He then spoke to Ohio officials to see if the county's program could be expanded statewide.  Officials from the Seattle program will visit the county at the end of the month. "They are coming to Cuyahoga County to help us develop the contracting procedure and documentation requirements so that we can have our community partners begin to link their clients to our system," he said. Many food stamp recipients are required to do some work to receive benefits, Merriman said. "We will work with social service providers who have clients who are underemployed or unemployed," he said. "We want to get people jobs and increased wages."
458 points by The Plain Dealer | Employment Cleveland Want Cuyahoga County Ohio Ohio Cuyahoga River Greater Cleveland Need
PizzaFire's Strongsville location set to open
PizzaFire will open its 10th location in the state in Strongsville. STRONGSVILLE, Ohio - PizzaFire is opening a restaurant in Strongsville, its 10th one in the state, on Wednesday, Sept. 14. The restaurant will be at 15163 Pearl Road, in the space formerly occupied by Tomo Steakhouse & Sushi Bar and the Ground Round. It's on the east side of Pearl just north of Shurmer Road. The first 500 people attending Wednesday's grand-opening festivities at 11 a.m. will receive a t-shirt, and everyone will get a scratch card for a chance to win food. A ribbon-cutting ceremony is set for 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 15. The fast-casual pizza chain has 10 locations in Ohio, with most in Northeast Ohio. It has spots in downtown Cleveland and Akron, Cuyahoga Falls, Woodmere, Rocky River and Niles, as well as the Columbus suburbs of Upper Arlington and Dublin. It also has a restaurant in Kettering near Dayton. Several more are planned throughout the state. The restaurant offers made-to-order pizzas with 40 fresh toppings and assorted sauces and cheeses. The pizzas are fire-baked in an 800-degree oven for 180 seconds.
512 points by The Plain Dealer | Ohio Cuyahoga County Ohio Greater Cleveland Cities in Ohio Cuyahoga River Cleveland Akron Ohio Cuyahoga Falls Ohio