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Death of man at Brandywine Falls in Cuyahoga Valley National Park ruled suicide by medical examiner
The death of a man found at Brandywine Falls Tuesday has been ruled a suicide by the Summit County Medical Examiner's Office. Watch video AKRON, Ohio -- An elderly man found dead at Brandywine Falls Tuesday took his own life, according to the Summit County Medical Examiner's Office. The office identified the man as 71-year-old August C. Voight, of Brecksville. Voight died of multiple blunt force injuries, Gary Gunther, chief investigator with the medical examiner's office, said Thursday. Voight was found at the base of a cliff overlooking a 65-foot waterfall on the eastern edge of the Cuyahoga Valley National Park in Sagamore Hills. Previous coverage: Elderly man found dead at Brandywine Falls in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park Voight's death is the third in the area since the falls became part of the national park. In 1995, a man fell over the boardwalk fence and died. There wasn't another death there until May 2011 when a 31-year-old Canal Fulton man died after falling from the top of the falls.    If you wish to discuss or comment on this story, please visit our crime and courts comments section. Like Chanda Neely on Facebook. Follow me on Twitter: Follow @ChandaNeely // !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+'://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js';fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document, 'script', 'twitter-wjs'); // ]]>
45 points by The Plain Dealer | Ohio and Erie Canal Cuyahoga Valley National Park Summit County Ohio Akron Ohio Death Brecksville Ohio Cuyahoga County Ohio Life
Brecksville Dam demolition the focus of public hearing tonight in Peninsula (photos)
The public will receive its first look this evening at what the Cuyahoga River will look like after the Brecksville Dam is removed next year or the year after. PENINSULA, Ohio - The public will receive its first look this evening at what the Cuyahoga River will look like after the Brecksville Dam is removed next year or the year after. The open house will be from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Happy Days Lodge, 500 West Streetsboro Road (Ohio 303) just East of Peninsula. The presentation is sponsored by the Ohio EPA and the National Park Service. Conservationists and friends of the Cuyahoga River generally support the dam demolition plan and the environmental benefits the plan will bring to the water quality and wildlife habitat in the river. No organized opposition is expected. "We're excited," said Pam Barnes, a spokeswoman for the Cuyahoga Valley National Park. "This is really a good thing for the river." "This project is exactly what we need for the Cuyahoga," said Peter Bode, watershed coordinator for Cuyahoga River Restoration. "It is ridding a major barrier for our migratory species to spawn upriver ... and nothing but a positive for the ecology of the region." Any grumbling about the dam's removal likely will be limited to steelhead trout anglers who enjoy casting their lines into the base of the dam's spillway, where the game fish congregate, unable to proceed upstream. "That is the shooting-fish-in-a-barrel place to be," said Jane Goodman, Cuyahoga River Restoration's executive director. "But it's a small dam. Most people don't even know it's there. I don't expect anyone except the steelhead anglers to have any objections." The EPA and parks officials will present the results of an environmental assessment conducted on the eight-foot tall, 183-foot long dam which spans the river just north of the Station Road bridge trailhead along the Towpath Trail. The assessment identifies an ecological restoration strategy to improve water quality while preserving the Ohio and Erie Canal's cultural integrity as a National Historic Landmark. The EPA and national park officials have proposed completely removing the dam, thus restoring the river to its natural flow conditions. They plan to install a pump to supply as much as 13 million gallons of water a day to the adjacent canal. By removing the dam, state environmentalists would move a step closer to returning the Cuyahoga to a free-flowing river, leaving the 57-foot high Gorge Dam between Akron and Cuyahoga Falls as the only impediment from its source in Geauga County to its mouth at Lake Erie. Removing the Gorge Dam, however, could cost as much as $70 million.
73 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga River Ohio and Erie Canal Ohio Cuyahoga Valley National Park Lake Erie Greater Cleveland Cuyahoga County Ohio National Park Service
WKSU to host public forum on effects of removing the Gorge Dam
WKSU and Exploradio will hold a public forum and panel discussion Sept. 21 on removing the Gorge Dam on the Cuyahoga River between Akron and Cuyahoga Falls. AKRON, Ohio - The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency has focused on removing the Gorge dam from the Cuyahoga River for more than a decade. The dam is located in the Gorge MetroPark between Akron and Cuyahoga Falls.  In March, the federal government said it would pay 65 percent of the $70 million cost to remove the 57-foot-high dam. Residents can attend a public forum hosted by WKSU and Exploradio to learn more about what removing the dam will mean and what can be done to remove the decades of sludge built up under the dam and downriver. The forum will be Sept. 21 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Sheraton Suites in Cuyahoga Falls. Register for the free event here. All Things Considered host and Exploradio producer Jeff St. Clair will moderate the public discussion. Panelists include representatives from the Ohio EPA, the city of Akron, Summit MetroParks and the local whitewater kayaking community.
7 points by The Plain Dealer | United States Environmental Protection Agency Ohio Federal government of the United States Cuyahoga River Greater Cleveland Akron Ohio Cuyahoga Falls Ohio Cuyahoga Valley National Park
Country LIving Fair in Columbus and migrating monarchs: Home and Garden News
Country LIving Fair in Columbus and migrating monarchs: Home and Garden News. Fair-goers line up for down-home tastes during the Country Living Fair, coming to Columbus in September. The fair brings the magazine's pages to life with booths filled with vintage items, antiques, handmade crafts and great music. Country Living Magazine  COUNTRY LIVING FAIR: The pages of Country Living magazine come to life during the Country Living Fair, returning to Columbus Friday through Sunday, Sept. 16-18. Special guests and Country Living editors will demonstrate how to make delicious recipes and fun crafts, and talk about beekeeping, creating a personalizes space, gardening and more. The fair offers antiques sellers, furniture makers and crafters, as well as book signings, cooking, crafting, and DIY demonstrations. Madcap Cottage founders Jason Oliver Nixon and John Loecke will talk about how they designed their Catskills home and how to use color and pattern to create a personalized space at 2 p.m. Friday. Nancy Fuller from the Food Network will lead a guided shopping trip through the fair on Saturday, Sept. 17 at 2 p.m. You'll find the complete schedule here. Country Living Fair is 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday through Sunday, Sept. 16-18. Gates open for Early Bird ticket holders at 8:30 a.m. Friday and Saturday. Ohio Village is located at 800 E. 17th Ave., Columbus. One-day admission is $13 in advance and $16 at the door; three-day weekend passes are available for $15 in advance and $20 at the door. An Early Bird three-day weekend pass, $40, lets you enter at 8:30 a.m. on Friday and Saturday. Admission is free for children ages 16 and under. MILKWEED FOR MONARCHS: This fall, you can collect milkweed seed pods to help the Cuyahoga Soil & Water Conservation District's effort to expand the habitat for monarch butterflies throughout Ohio. The Ohio Pollinator Habitat Initiative - a partnership of the Ohio Division of Wildlife and other organizations -- will process the seed pods and establish new plantings of milkweed. During these times the Monarch breeds and lays their eggs on milkweed plants. Milkweed is the only plant that Monarch caterpillars will feed and lay their eggs on. The Ohio Pollinator Habitat Initiative works to educate the public and trying to gain more awareness of the milkweed decline, according to a press release from the conservation district. If you would like to join in this effort, harvest milkweed pods that are dry and gray or brown in color. The pod's seam should pop easily under your thumb. Store pods in a paper bag, placed in a dry, cool place. Mark your bags with the county they were picked in, and the date and time when they were collected. Collected seed pods from Common Milkweed can be dropped off at the Cuyahoga Soil & Water Conservation District's office from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays, or left in the collection bin outside the office after those hours. The office is located at 6100 West Canal Road, Valley View. The collection drive continues through Sunday, Oct. 30. Click here for more information. MONARCH MIGRATION: Monarch butterflies are beginning their amazing migration, and their path leads them over Northeast Ohio on the way to their wintering grounds in Mexico. Tag and release monarchs as part of the Monarch Watch program during a session titled Monarch Migration, 2 to 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10 at the Brecksville Nature Center in the Cleveland Metroparks. The session is free and advance registration is not required. Expect to walk about 1 1/2 miles in prairies and meadows. The nature center is located at 9000 Chippewa Creek Dr., Brecksviille.
1 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga Valley National Park Greater Cleveland Cuyahoga County Ohio Columbus Ohio Ohio Saturday Cleveland Metroparks Illinois
Millionaire collected food stamps, prosecutor says; proposal would make abortion murder; officer's neck broken by teens: Overnight News Links
Also, shooting in parking lot of Cleveland police station wounds 1; Tamir Rice 911 call taker disciplined for 'rude, unprofessional' behavior in recent incident; Northeast Ohio schools closed Thursday due to heat Watch video Featured stories Raid targets Geauga County millionaire on food stamps (WKYC Channel 3) Proposal would brand abortion as aggravated murder in Ohio (cleveland.com) Corrections officer's neck broken during teens' breakout (Canton Repository) Crime Shooting in parking lot of Cleveland police station wounds 1 (cleveland.com) Cuyahoga County Jail sergeant disciplined in excessive force case (cleveland.com) Avon police officer on leave after drunken-driving arrest (cleveland.com) Cleveland woman accused of forcing homeless woman into prostitution (cleveland.com) One injured in afternoon shooting near University of Akron (cleveland.com) Cleveland Heights police officer accused of holding gun to his wife's back during domestic dispute (audio) (cleveland.com) Cuyahoga Falls man gets five years in prison for shaking infant (cleveland.com) Cleveland hip-hop artist on house arrest taken into custody after someone shot up his house (cleveland.com) Death penalty trial begins for man charged in Warrensville Heights barbershop slayings (cleveland.com) Felon tied to Cleveland smash-and-grab ring (cleveland.com) Three teens charged in separate robberies in Cleveland Heights (cleveland.com) Detroit-area trucking company owner sentenced to nine years for dealing club drugs (cleveland.com) Two charged after Cleveland federal agents seize more than 200 pounds of cocaine (cleveland.com) Four shot in three hours in Cleveland, including teen (cleveland.com) FBI expands search for man they believe abducted one girl, tried to snatch another (WEWS Channel 5) Sheffield Township man arrested after Lorain shooting (Lorain Morning Journal) Cleveland / Cuyahoga County Tamir Rice 911 call taker disciplined for 'rude, unprofessional' behavior in recent incident (cleveland.com) Northeast Ohio schools closed Thursday due to heat (cleveland.com) How hot is too hot for school when there's no air conditioning? (cleveland.com) Donald Trump to appear at Cleveland charter school Thursday (cleveland.com) Monument company to review vandalism damage at historic Cleveland cemetery (cleveland.com) Cleveland paints over accidental bike lane on Ontario (cleveland.com) Jack Cleveland Casino revenue rebounds in August (cleveland.com) More RTA service cuts go into effect Sunday (cleveland.com) Local news East John Carroll University closes 2 dorms because of power outage (cleveland.com) Local news West Elderly man found dead at Brandywine Falls in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park (cleveland.com) Akron / Canton area Newly merged Cleveland Clinic Akron General names president (cleveland.com) State Sen. Rob Portman launches investigation into EpiPen pricing (cleveland.com) The most famous person from each county in Ohio (cleveland.com)
2 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Greater Cleveland Akron Ohio Ohio Cleveland Summit County Ohio Cuyahoga River Cuyahoga Valley National Park
Cuyahoga Falls man gets five years in prison for shaking infant
A Cuyahoga Falls man was sentenced to five years in prison Wednesday for shaking his girlfriend's baby, Summit County prosecutor's said. AKRON, Ohio -- A Cuyahoga Falls man was sentenced to five years in prison Wednesday for shaking his girlfriend's baby, Summit County prosecutor's said. William Jobe, 29, of Second Street, pleaded guilty to child endangering last month. He was arrested in August 2015 after he admitted to police that he shook the 8-month-old baby, prosecutors said. The infant suffered temporary paralysis, according to prosecutors. Jobe, who was home alone with the baby when the incident took place, called 911 and said the girl was having a hard time breathing. The baby was admitted to the Akron Children's Hospital's intensive care unit with serious injuries. Previous coverage: Man charged with shaking, injuring infant in Cuyahoga Falls If you wish to discuss or comment on this story, please visit our crime and courts comments section. Like Chanda Neely on Facebook. Follow me on Twitter: Follow @ChandaNeely // !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+'://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js';fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document, 'script', 'twitter-wjs'); // ]]>
36 points by The Plain Dealer | Summit County Ohio Akron Ohio Ohio Cuyahoga Valley National Park Akron metropolitan area Cuyahoga Falls Ohio Ohio and Erie Canal Stow Ohio
4 Northeast Ohio providers owe Medicaid department more than $1 million, state auditor says
Ohio Auditor Dave Yost's office calculated more than $1 million in Medicaid overpayments received by four Northeast Ohio providers. Ohio Auditor Dave YostOhio Auditor's office  COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Four Northeast Ohio Medicaid providers together must pay back more than $1 million in overpayments, says Ohio Auditor Dave Yost. Much of that was received by G.S. Burton Development in Summit County. State auditors calculated $895,617 in overpayments from Burston, stemming from 860 service errors that occurred between 2012 and 2014. Burton largely provided non-medical transportation and personal care aide services, according to the report from Yost's office. Auditors determined 283 of the 22,357 services provided during those two years were by 18 employees deemed ineligible providers for some or all of the time. "These requirements are pure commonsense," Yost said in a news release. "It's disturbing to know that some Ohioans risk being in the care of individuals who lack basic but essential medical training and who haven't even been properly vetted for the job." The findings Employees were ineligible for a variety of reasons: lack of criminal background checks and drug tests, missing personnel files, no first aid and/or CPR certification or failure to complete required annual training hours. The audit also found two drivers didn't have a valid driver's license for some time, one had a suspended license and another driver had a record with six driving points, mandating a warning letter from the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles. Plus interest, Burton owes $951,526 to the Department of Medicaid. The response In a formal response to the audit, CEO Sherice Burton said paperwork and billing errors were just that and services were still provided to Medicaid recipients. Burton said the company grew quickly and moved locations, which caused delays in processing paperwork. The company has since hired another secretary to keep up with forms. "We love what we do and do not want the findings to impede us in anyway. You have our full cooperation and we would like to do whatever we have to so that we can keep our business and continue to serve our community," Burton wrote. Other findings Auditors also found overpayments for three other providers. A Cuyahoga County provider named Sharon Mason was overpaid $49,530 from 2012 through 2014 due to 166 errors in service documentation. The template Mason used to report 74 services was unreliable, auditors determined, and there were other instances of billing additional shifts when only one shift was documented. Auditors also reviewed records for two Lake county intermediate care facilities, which house individuals with intellectual disabilities, for services rendered in 2014. At Madison Village Manor, auditors found $57,061 in overpayments made in 2014. The provider received reimbursements for 241 days of service for an individual after he or she was discharged from the facility. The provider was aware of the error and made efforts to correct the recipient's status. At Broadfield Care Center, auditors identified $24,230 in overpayments. The provider was reimbursed for 86 unauthorized bed hold days. Holding beds when patients are temporarily absent requires authorization.
-2 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Audit Financial audit Cuyahoga River Geauga County Ohio Background check Cuyahoga Valley National Park Driver's license
Greater Cleveland Volunteers - Opportunities for the week of Feb. 15, 2017
Greater Cleveland Volunteers enriches the community and individuals through volunteer services. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Greater Cleveland Volunteers enriches the community and individuals through volunteer services. We recruit individuals age 18 years+ to volunteer at 100+ nonprofit organizations throughout Cuyahoga County. We offer on-going and special event volunteer opportunities. Connect with us at greaterclevelandvolunteers.org, Facebook and Twitter @CLEvolunteers. We have volunteer coordinators available at 216-391-9500. Here are a few featured volunteer opportunities. Have an interest and don't see it? Call us and a volunteer coordinator will assist. On-Going Home repair needs - Are you available weekdays? Make upgrades to homes of specific screened clients. Keep individual homes in Cuyahoga and neighboring counties safe, accessible and upgraded for seniors. Projects may include installing door knobs, smoke detectors, grab bars, doorbells and hand rails. Help this agency reach their goal to service 100 homes. Background check is required. Contact Sandy at 216-391-9500, x 120 or [email protected] Hospice: A Special Kind of Caring - Respite and friendly pet owner volunteers are encouraged to support caregivers and/or offer weekly pet visits to patients. The dog must be a certified therapy dog. The volunteer must produce current records for the pet and a current Ohio license. Hospice training and background check are required. Contact Sandy at 216-391-9500, x 120 or [email protected] Dramatic Arts - If you're a musician or enjoy the theatre there is an after-school program that is seeking volunteers. If a musician, you could provide valuable lessons to low income students in instrumental and/or vocal music. Piano, violin and vocal teachers are especially needed. Choose to teach one student or a group. The school is located in Ohio City. If you enjoy theatre, assistants are needed for their stage productions. The students enjoy this creative energy outlet! Contact Cecille at 216-391-9500 x 122 or [email protected]
-2 points by The Plain Dealer | Greater Cleveland Cleveland Cuyahoga County Ohio Cuyahoga River Akron Ohio Lakewood Ohio Cuyahoga Valley National Park Theatre
Cleveland-area home sales dipped slightly in January, but prices were up (interactive maps)
Northeast Ohio home sales started 2017 on slightly softer footing, but January prices were up notably from a year before. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Northeast Ohio home sales started 2017 on slightly softer footing, but January prices were up notably from a year before. Across 18 counties, sales were down 1.5 percent from January of 2016, according to fresh figures from the Northern Ohio Regional Multiple Listing Service. That's a difference of only 39 properties, most of them condominiums. // var divElement = document.getElementById('viz1487028787539'); var vizElement = divElement.getElementsByTagName('object')[0]; vizElement.style.width='100%';vizElement.style.height=(divElement.offsetWidth*0.75)+'px'; var scriptElement = document.createElement('script'); scriptElement.src = 'https://public.tableau.com/javascripts/api/viz_v1.js'; vizElement.parentNode.insertBefore(scriptElement, vizElement); // ]]> Prices, meanwhile, were up when compared with last year's levels. The average sale price for a house in the region was $140,765 in January, a 5.6 percent jump from the first month of 2016. At $125,711, the average sale price for a condo was 15.7 percent higher than a year before, the listing service reported. Sales and prices both dipped from December to January, but that's typical at the turn of the year. Among counties with at least 100 transfers in January, Lorain County experienced the steepest annual sales gain - 18 percent. The county's average sale price was up by 8.4 percent, to $149,487, when compared with a year before. In Cuyahoga County, sales topped their January 2016 levels by 1.5 percent, with 852 transactions. The average sale price posted a 4 percent annual gain, reaching $142,720 in January. Sales were essentially flat - down 0.5 percent - in Summit County, home to Akron. But the average sale price, at $138,405, was up 12 percent from a year before. The listing-service data captures most local residential real estate transactions. // var divElement = document.getElementById('viz1487028807457'); var vizElement = divElement.getElementsByTagName('object')[0]; vizElement.style.width='100%';vizElement.style.height=(divElement.offsetWidth*0.75)+'px'; var scriptElement = document.createElement('script'); scriptElement.src = 'https://public.tableau.com/javascripts/api/viz_v1.js'; vizElement.parentNode.insertBefore(scriptElement, vizElement); // ]]> In January, Geauga County had the highest average sale price in the region, at $271,203. Jefferson County, home to Steubenville, had the lowest average sale price, at $80,435. Homes in the region sold for as little as $800 and as much as $2.4 million during January, the listing service reported. The National Association of Realtors and Ohio Association of Realtors are scheduled to release their January home-sales reports on Feb. 22.
25 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Greater Cleveland Geauga County Ohio Summit County Ohio Lorain County Ohio Akron Ohio Ohio counties Cuyahoga Valley National Park
RTA riders rally to reopen Public Square to buses; 'whistleblower' targets Pilot Flying J: Overnight News Links
Also, RTA riders rally for reopening of Public Square to buses; Cleveland Teachers Union leaders and school district reach a possible contract; Prosecutors uncover dozens of uncharged juvenile cases, including rape Watch video Featured stories RTA riders rally for reopening of Public Square to buses (cleveland.com) Pilot of 48 years, on Cessna disappearance: Not likely weather-related (WOIO Channel 19) 'Whistleblower' claims Pilot Flying J fraud cheated federal government (WKYC Channel 3) Cleveland Teachers Union leaders and school district reach a possible contract (cleveland.com) Crime Prosecutors uncover dozens of uncharged juvenile cases, including rape (cleveland.com) Prosecutors will seek death penalty against suspect in Alianna DeFreeze killing (cleveland.com)  Heartless Felon gang member pistol-whipped, shot Cleveland teen at close range, police say (cleveland.com) Computer stolen at gunpoint in Akron Craigslist robbery (cleveland.com) Four robbed in 12 days at Cleveland State, university says (cleveland.com) Five Cuyahoga County banks robbed in one day, FBI says (cleveland.com) Man wanted in 2015 fatal Akron gas station shootout arrested (cleveland.com) Cleveland man who ran online child porn sharing group pleads guilty (cleveland.com) Cleveland man charged in fatal shooting in city's Clark-Fulton neighborhood (cleveland.com) Cleveland man shot while running from drive-by shooting (cleveland.com) Thieves steal $4,500 Boy Scout trailer with pinewood derby track inside (WOIO Channel 19) Lorain fatal shooting under investigation (Lorain Morning Journal) Lorain man sentenced for 2015 fatal crash (Lorain Morning Journal) Cleveland / Cuyahoga County FAA releases air traffic control audio in Lake Erie plane crash that killed 6 (cleveland.com) Allegiant Air launches service in Cleveland; 4 things to know about Hopkins' newest carrier (cleveland.com) Missing Cleveland man has been found, police say (cleveland.com) Local news East Colleges work together to improve Lake and Geauga counties (cleveland.com) Local news West Avon infant beats odds, gets new heart (WKYC Channel 3) Bat species could be latest roadblock in NEXUS pipeline through Northeast Ohio (WEWS Channel 5) Amish buggy driver has survived 14 accidents (Elyria Chronicle-Telegram) Akron / Canton area Gov. John Kasich appoints two judges to Akron Municipal Court (cleveland.com) City passes $966 million in 2017 spending plans (Akron Beacon Journal) Cuyahoga Falls offers safe exchange location for craigslist, Facebook purchases (cleveland.com) State 'Right-to-work' bill introduced in Ohio House (cleveland.com) Trump administration pulls back federal stance on transgender restroom use (cleveland.com) President Donald Trump cancels planned visit to Northeast Ohio (cleveland.com) Opioid addiction means more Ohio kids in protective custody (cleveland.com) Josh Mandel, gearing up for 2018 Senate run, has recruited campaign leaders in all 88 Ohio counties (cleveland.com) How technology could change Ohio, according to Gov. John Kasich (cleveland.com)
2 points by The Plain Dealer | Ohio Greater Cleveland Akron Ohio Cuyahoga River Cleveland Cuyahoga County Ohio Cuyahoga Valley National Park Summit County Ohio
Brookside flooding closes Cleveland Metroparks Zoo
Flooding near Cleveland Metroparks Zoo forces it to close, though it may reopen Wednesday. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Rainwater and snowmelt raised the level of Big Creek nine feet Tuesday morning, flooding the Brookside Reservation and closing the adjacent Cleveland Metroparks Zoo. Big Creek, the Cuyahoga River tributary whose 30-square-mile watershed drains from seven communities, began receding Tuesday afternoon. During Tuesday's storm its level rose to 11.4 feet from 2.4 feet, at one point rising 2-1/2 feet in 90 minutes. Brookside Reservation lies at the bottom of the watershed. By comparison, the nearby Rocky River peaked at 5.5 feet Tuesday, from a level of 1.5 feet. No animals at the zoo were threatened by the flooding. "We closed proactively to ensure safety and vehicle safety," said Dr. Christopher Kuhar, the zoo's executive director. "There is no flooding at the zoo." No decision has been made yet about the zoo's opening on Wednesday.
102 points by The Plain Dealer | Greater Cleveland Cuyahoga County Ohio Cleveland Cleveland Metroparks Zoo Cleveland Metroparks Ohio Water Cuyahoga Valley National Park
See transformation of Akron's Lock 4 park through lighting, landscaping, music (video)
The Ohio & Erie Canalway Coalition on Thursday showed off the new amenities the group is implementing at Lock 4 park as part of a $5 million Reimagining the Civic Commons grant. Watch video AKRON, Ohio - Ahead of this weekend's Downtown Akron Harvest Fest, the Ohio & Erie Canalway Coalition unveiled new year-round, multi-colored lighting at Akron's Lock 4 park and over the Route 59 bridge that brings the Towpath Trail into downtown Akron. Now, new jewel-tone LED lighting at Lock 4 shifts colors, reflecting off the Ohio & Erie Canal as it cascades over small waterfalls, and makes the old brick buildings glow with hues that deepen as darkness falls. Bright white lights twinkle from trees planted around the perimeter. For this weekend's festival, Adirondack chairs, beer garden-style tables and moveable furniture will be added to allow Akronites to relax and toast s'mores at open fire pits, while local vendors serve food and spirits. A movie will play on the side of the Civic Theatre. The Lock 4 project is one of the first the Canalway Coalition has implemented through its $5 million Reimagining the Civic Commons grant. A block away, the Route 59 bridge is also lit in vivid hues programmed to change color, creating waves and dappled effects. New cedar benches line the bridge, side-by-side with steel planters filled with colorful vegetation and signs to the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, the Akron Art Museum and other areas of interest. It's all designed to make the space more inviting for downtown residents, workers, visitors and Towpath Trail users. "It's like an oasis," said Canalway Coalition President Dan Rice. "That's going to be our challenge. People are going to want to see more." To design the urban park, the Canalway Coalition is working with Groundswell Design Group, based in Philadelphia. Groundswell has led work on similar projects, designing spaces to be enjoyed in winter , along waterways and in warmer seasons. "We just gave Akron all the ingredients to make a great cake," said Groundswell president David Fierabend. Lock 4 will also offer outdoor games, such as giant Jenga, concrete ping-pong and cornhole. "People can come down here during the day and have a coffee and blow off steam," he said. Akron was selected for the grant to enable the Canalway Coalition to come up with effective ways to revitalize and connect public spaces along the Towpath Trail that bring together people from different backgrounds. The organization has reached out to the community over the past year to gather input from residents to assist in that process. Many additional projects are planned for the next three years along the Towpath Trail from downtown Akron to Summit Lake. Many of the improvements planned for the park will be showcased this weekend at the Harvest Festival. Harvest Fest to kick off public space improvements in downtown Akron
68 points by The Plain Dealer | Ohio and Erie Canal Akron Ohio Ohio Cuyahoga Valley National Park Erie Canal Cuyahoga River Light-emitting diode Lighting
Arabica reopens, other shops get ready in historic Willoughby (photos)
Arabica will reopen at 5:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 23, in historic downtown Willoughby, while Fiona's Bakery and an old-time general store are on the rise in Arabica's old space two doors away. WILLOUGHBY, Ohio -- One of the region's iconic Arabica coffeehouses will reopen at 5:30 p.m. Friday, Sept 23, in downtown Willoughby, after moving two doors east on Erie Street from one 19th-century building to another. Owner Frank Suponcic hopes for a good turnout Friday and beyond. "The support has been phenomenal," says Suponcic, former Lake County auditor. "So many people have been walking in during construction wanting to know when the place was going to open up." Suponcic's lease ran out in June at his old home, where he had about 4,000 square feet on a main corner. His new home at 4134 Erie St. has just 2,300 square feet but more space in front for patio tables than his old home had. Suponcic's rehanging his trove of historic Willoughby memorabilia in his new location. The space used to be part of the Art Gallery, which remains open next door. Between Arabica's old home and its new one lies the Wild Goose restaurant. Its owners, McPat and Seamus McMahon, are two of four partners taking over the old Arabica space for a Fiona's Bakery. The McMahon brothers hope to open before Thanksgiving. Above Fiona's, in a second story little used in recent years, an old-time general store is on the rise. The McMahon brothers also own Willoughby's Morehouse restaurant and Croagh Patrick's Pub. Their family runs McMahon-Coyne-Vitantonio Funeral Home in Willoughby and Mentor. The region's first Arabica opened in 1976 on Coventry and became a popular hangout for poets, singers, chess players, philosophers and more. In 1992, Willoughby's new mayor, David Anderson, helped to bring a coffees hop to downtown that became an Arabica about 20 years ago. Anderson, still mayor 24 years later, credits the shop with a boom that has filled up downtown. Other Arabicas survive in Wadsworth, Amherst, North Ridgeville, Chesterland, Cuyahoga Falls (inside Western Reserve Hospital), and Elyria (a Rubin's Restaurant/Arabica). Several other local restaurants offer Arabica coffee, which is made by Caruso's Coffee of Brecksville. Scott Hagg owns Arabica's name and logo. He has opened a Caruso's cafe in New Cairo, Egypt, and an Uncle Al's American Cafe in El Harhoura, Morocco, both serving Caruso's Arabica blend.   
56 points by The Plain Dealer | Coffee Lorain County Ohio Ohio Croagh Patrick Cities in Ohio Cairo Coffea arabica Cuyahoga Valley National Park
Akron to save nearly $57 million on sewer projects this year
Dialogue between the city of Akron and state and federal EPAs has led to nearly $57 million in savings through modifications to the city's long-range work plan to bring the sewer system into compliance with the Clean Water Act. AKRON, Ohio - The city of Akron will save an additional $38 million on current sewer projects, bringing total sewer project savings this year to $56.7 million. At a press conference Wednesday, Mayor Dan Horrigan said the latest savings are a result of ongoing dialogue with the state and federal Environmental Protection Agencies and other agencies. Those talks led to two major modifications to the city's 2014 agreement detailing the long-range plan to bring the sewer system into compliance with the Clean Water Act. "This is the way the process should work," Horrigan said. "We're constantly looking at what will be the best way forward. Eventually this community is going to have to pay for all this, so we're working to bring down costs." Approved modifications for projects near the Akron Water Reclamation Facility also will eliminate the need to close at least a mile of the Towpath Trail for about two years. Akron unveils new plan to save on $1.4 billion sewer project Here is where the savings are from: Redesign of the main sewer trunk worth $30 million The original plan for sewer upgrades included building a second pipeline alongside the existing main sewer trunk visible on Riverview Road. The sewer trunk was built out of brick in the 1920s and the the EPA was concerned it could eventually break during large flows. Original plans called for a second line to be built to capture some of the flow, disrupting the Towpath Trail, the Cuyahoga River, area wetlands and possibly the nearby Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad. However, a city inspection of the main sewer trunk found it in good shape. The EPA approved a modification to place a concrete cap, with walls and foundational support, along the length of the trunk, adding protection and extending its life. The concrete is colored brown to blend with the natural surroundings. Because the Towpath Trail has a $450 million per year economic impact on the area, its closure would have been detrimental, said Dan Rice, president and CEO of the Ohio & Erie Canalway Coalition. "We are extremely grateful to the city for recognizing the importance of the Towpath Trail," Rice said. "They have been working tirelessly behind the scenes to find the best possible solution." Three green projects worth $8 million Earlier this year state and federal agencies to substitute three green infrastructure projects for "gray" storage basins. Rather than build large concrete storage basins to capture sewer overflow, the city instead will separate the combined storm/sanitary sewers in certain areas so the storage basins won't be needed. Treatment projects ahead of schedule The EPA also increased the biological secondary treatment capacity of the Akron Water Reclamation Facility to 220 million gallons per day from 130 million gallons per day. That puts the city ahead of schedule for sewer system improvements at the water reclamation facility. In early September, city engineers presented a plan that earned the city the EPA's Water Pollution Control Loan Fund Nutrient Reduction Discount. It eliminated interest on a loan for work at the city's Water Reclamation Facility, reducing the cost of the loan by $18.7 million.
61 points by The Plain Dealer | Water pollution Clean Water Act Combined sewer Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad Cuyahoga Valley National Park Ohio and Erie Canal Sewage treatment United States Environmental Protection Agency
Pregnant woman shot on East Side; lawmaker focuses on toy guns; men accused of killing robbery witness: Overnight News Links
Also, cancer-causing pollutant made famous by Erin Brockovich found in NE Ohio drinking water; Akron police search for shooter in fatal 2015 gas station shootout; Meijer to move ahed in Mentor once Kmart closes Featured stories Pregnant woman shot on Cleveland's East Side (WEWS Channel 5) Ohio lawmaker asks parents to get rid of real-looking toy guns (cleveland.com) Cleveland men charged with executing 17-year-old girl who witnessed bank robbery (cleveland.com) Crime Akron police search for shooter in fatal 2015 gas station shootout (cleveland.com) Perry Township man pleads guilty to murder in death of 1-year-old boy (cleveland.com) Elyria woman charged after suspected overdose with grandson in truck (Elyria Chronicle-Telegram) Man tries to escape from jail through cell's food slot (WEWS Channel 5) Authorities search for West Side Cleveland bank robber (cleveland.com) Northfield Fire District vandals wrote profanity, urinated on equipment (WKYC Channel 3) Man shot outside convenience store in Cleveland's Glenville neighborhood (cleveland.com) Cleveland man 'attacked anyone within striking distance' in violent West Side bar fight, records say (cleveland.com) Cleveland man accused of shooting girlfriend over cellphone spent three years in prison for 2001 shooting (cleveland.com) Authorities arrest man accused of taking child while mother was showering (WOIO Channel 19) Man admits he broke into elderly woman's home while in the nude (Canton Repository) Cleveland / Cuyahoga County Cancer-causing pollutant made famous by Erin Brockovich found in NE Ohio drinking water (cleveland.com) Cleveland Republican National Convention host committee exceeded $64 million fundraising goal, new filing shows (cleveland.com) UH Bikes rolls out 250 bikes in Cleveland for official bike sharing launch (cleveland.com) Cleveland listed as one of the 'Best Places to Live in the U.S.' by Time Out (cleveland.com) Collisions with deer on roads shoot up in Northeast Ohio (cleveland.com) Brecksville-Broadview Heights schools rank # 8 in Ohio on state report cards; North Royalton, Strongsville schools rank #10, #13 in Cuyahoga County (cleveland.com) Cats, kittens take over Cleveland neighborhood (WEWS Channel 5) Local news East Child dies after being struck by car in Chardon (News-Herald) AACS district sued in case of bus driver accused of sexually abusing children (Ashtabula Star Beacon) Meijer to move ahed in Mentor once Kmart closes (News-Herald)  Local news West Rocky River Montessori school accused of kicking out child with autism settles with U.S. Justice Department (cleveland.com) Parents say son spent 48 hours in Olmsted Falls restraint & seclusion room (WOIO Channel 19) Child struck by vehicle in Lorain (Lorain Morning Journal) Lakewood mayor, fire chief defend EMS response times since hospital's closure (cleveland.com) Parma man sues over arrest, prosecution for creating fake police department Facebook page (cleveland.com) Strongsville scraps I-71 slip ramp project after NOACA hesitates (cleveland.com) Strongsville school district sells Drake Elementary School property to resident with plans for senior living (cleveland.com) Akron / Canton area State Reince Priebus makes a mess in Ohio and upsets a top Republican whose help he can't afford to lose (cleveland.com) Ohio again sues Army Corps of Engineers over dredging of Cuyahoga River shipping channel (cleveland.com) Ohio's energy future cloudy at best, storms likely (video) (cleveland.com) Court records: Rape claims against teacher include several sites (Dayton Daily News)
-1 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Greater Cleveland Akron Ohio Ohio Cuyahoga River Lorain County Ohio WOIO Cuyahoga Valley National Park
Elderly man found dead at Brandywine Falls in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park
An elderly man was found dead Tuesday at the base of a cliff at Brandywine Falls, according to the Summit County Medical Examiner's Office. Watch video SAGAMORE HILLS, Ohio -- An elderly man was found dead Tuesday at the base of a cliff at Brandywine Falls, according to the Summit County Medical Examiner's Office. The man had not been identified, Gary Guenther, chief investigator with the medical examiner's office, said Wednesday morning. He was found at the base of a cliff overlooking a 65-foot waterfall in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Investigators are still trying to determine how the man died. "Circumstances are still unclear," Guenther said. Law enforcement and firefighters responded to a report of a park visitor falling around 12 p.m. Tuesday. The 65-foot waterfall is a popular destination on the eastern edge of the national park. Tuesday's death marks the third in the area since the falls became part of the national park. In 1995, a man fell over the boardwalk fence and died. There wasn't another death there until May 2011 when a 31-year-old Canal Fulton man died after falling from the top of the falls.  Previous coverage: at Brandywine Falls in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park Like Chanda Neely on Facebook. Follow me on Twitter: Follow @ChandaNeely // !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+'://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js';fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document, 'script', 'twitter-wjs'); // ]]>
107 points by The Plain Dealer | Ohio and Erie Canal Summit County Ohio Death Cuyahoga Valley National Park Akron Ohio Cuyahoga County Ohio Cuyahoga Falls Ohio Brecksville Ohio
Looking for a concert? Here are some of Cleveland's top spots
Cleveland's live music scene is thriving, in large part due to a plethora of different sized venues. Here are some of those where big shows are on tap this fall. CLEVELAND, Ohio - Northeast Ohio is rife with concert venues that will be bringing in quality acts this fall. Here are the addresses of a few of the major concert locations: Agora Theatre and Ballroom, 5000 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland. Akron Civic Theatre, 182 S. Main Street, Akron. Beachland Ballroom, 15711 Waterloo Road in Cleveland's Collinwood neighborhood. Blossom Music Center, 1145 W. Steels Corners Road, Cuyahoga Falls. GAR Hall, 1785 Main Street, Peninsula. Goodyear Theater, 1201 E. Market Street, Akron. Grog Shop, 2785 Euclid Heights Blvd., Cleveland Heights. Hard Rock Rocksino, 10777 Northfield Road, Northfield. House of Blues, 308 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland. Kent Stage, 175 E. Main St., Kent. Masonic Auditorium, 3615 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland. Music Box Supper Club, 1148 Main Avenue on the west bank of Cleveland's Flats. Nighttown, 12383 Cedar Road, Cleveland. Playhouse Square Theatre Complex (Allen, Connor Palace, Hanna, Ohio, State theaters), 1501 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland. Quicken Loans Arena, 1 Center Court, Cleveland.
-1 points by The Plain Dealer | Ohio Greater Cleveland Cleveland Downtown Cleveland Cuyahoga Falls Ohio Cuyahoga Valley National Park Cuyahoga County Ohio Akron Ohio
Akron police search for Labor Day burglary suspect
Akron police are looking for a person who may have stolen three guns from a home in a Labor Day burglary. AKRON, Ohio -- Akron police are asking for the public's help to identify a possible suspect in connection with a Labor Day burglary. The burglary took place between 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. on the 1100 block of Mount Vernon Avenue, near East Cuyahoga Falls Avenue, according to an Akron police news release sent Friday. The burglar forced open the house's front door and stole three guns, police said. A possible suspect in the burglary was caught on a residential surveillance camera. The man is estimated to be between 18 and 23 years old, has a goatee and tattoos on his arms and legs, police said. The burglar should be considered armed and dangerous, police said. Anyone with information about the suspect's identity and whereabouts is asked to contact Akron police at 330-375-2552. If you'd like to comment on this post, please visit the cleveland.com crime and courts comments section.
15 points by The Plain Dealer | Ohio Cuyahoga River Summit County Ohio Cuyahoga Valley National Park Greater Cleveland Theft Akron metropolitan area Cuyahoga Falls Ohio