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Niyo: Austin's Lions defense under the gun
Austin's defense under the gun        
-1 points by The Detroit News | American football positions Ndamukong Suh 2009 NFL Draft Blitz Defense American football Linebacker A Little Bit
Giants defense faces $200M expectations
What can $200 million buy you? That’s what the 29-room Playboy Mansion in Los Angeles was on the market for earlier this year. It can buy you two Boeing 757 airplanes, like the one Donald Trump owns and has his name plastered all over. It can buy you 25 Maybach Exeleros, which at $8 million...
35 points by New York Post | American football positions New York Giants Defense Giant
Politics of lopsided victories vary between college football coaches
PHOENIX – Ohio State Coach Urban Meyer was critical of his starting receivers after the Buckeyes’ opener against Bowling Green. Same thing with most of the offensive linemen and Ohio State’s kickoff coverage unit. The defensive backs “did okay.”All this after Ohio State set a school record with 776...
-1 points by Concord Monitor | American football Urban Meyer Jim Harbaugh Ohio Coaching Oak Ridge Associated Universities Defense Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities
Niyo: Austin's defense under the gun
Austin's defense under the gun        
-1 points by The Detroit News | American football positions Ndamukong Suh 2009 NFL Draft Blitz Defense American football Linebacker A Little Bit
Bears secondary working through growing pains
As the Bears prepare to defend the Texans’ retooled passing game in Sunday’s season opener, one particular word comes to mind about their secondary: unproven. Other descriptors apply, such as inexperienced, thin and, perhaps, depleted. But overall, this is a group with much to prove after accounting...
-1 points by Chicago Tribune | American football American football positions National Football League Cornerback Canadian football Defense Wide receiver Lateral pass
UM's grape-eating, 375-pound Onwenu unleashes wrath
Cass Tech product is biggest Wolverines player who eats fruit -- not junk food.        
-1 points by The Detroit News | Cass Technical High School Jim Harbaugh Play Play High school Defense United States Department of Defense
Medical marijuana is now legal in Ohio but not much changes for patients
Ohio's medical marijuana law takes effect Sept. 8, but little will change for patients, law enforcement officials and physicians. COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Medical marijuana is now legal in Ohio, but -- and it's a big but -- patients won't be able to legally buy it here for at least a year, maybe two.  Until then, Ohio's new medical marijuana law gives patients an "affirmative defense" against a drug charge, if they have a doctor's note and meet other criteria. But patients haven't had much luck obtaining such notes ahead of the law's effective date today, another example to add to the law's long list of unknowns.  Also on that list: How many growers and dispensaries will be allowed? What will doctors have to do in order to recommend medical marijuana?   So although today has been on the calendars of many Ohio advocates, it's a largely symbolic date that most consider the starting line in what could be a complicated path to a working medical marijuana program.  What happens today  Starting today, patients who would qualify for the program have an "affirmative defense" against prosecution for possessing marijuana and paraphernalia that would be legal under the law, if a doctor signs off. The patient's physician must certify in writing that a bona fide relationship exists, the patient has one of about 20 qualifying conditions and that they have discussed the benefits and risks to using medical marijuana. Ohio legalized medical marijuana: Here's what you need to know Nicole Scholten of Cincinnati, whose 12-year-old daughter Lucy has cerebral palsy and epilepsy, said the majority of patients she knows have not had success obtaining an affirmative defense note. Scholten is hopeful Lucy's doctors and other health care professionals will support medical marijuana use but said more education is needed.  "I encourage patients to be cautious because the affirmative defense is really a theory," Scholten said. "It's not a tested theory and it's a theory no one wants to test. Patients should not think all is accepted and well."  June: Ohio medical marijuana law allows limited possession, use on Sept. 8 but doesn't say where people can get it The affirmative defense only protects patients using one of the forms described in the law: Marijuana-infused edibles, tinctures, oils, patches and plant material. The law prohibits smoking marijuana and allows vaping, but the final list of approved forms and methods will be decided by the Ohio State Board of Pharmacy. The law is silent on where patients are supposed to get their marijuana and doesn't allow people to grow their own. Bringing marijuana into Ohio from a legal state would violate federal law.  And the affirmative defense is just that, a defense in court that would come into play after arrest. It won't protect patients from being fired for marijuana use -- employers' right to do so is explicitly protected in the law. What doctors are doing Most Ohio physicians are waiting for the rules and regulations or at least some guidance from the Ohio State Medical Board.   The board plans to issue some guidance, spokeswoman Tessie Pollock said, but not this week.  The Ohio State Medical Association, which represents thousands of Ohio physicians, has recommended its members not act at this time. Association spokesman Reggie Fields said the affirmative defense part of the law has caused a lot of confusion among patients and doctors.  "The affirmative defense piece allows a doctor to certify a person has a condition but there's no real system in place to outline exactly what that certification process is," Fields said. "There's still not a formal standard of care for using medical marijuana in Ohio."   Physicians might be more willing to talk about marijuana with their patients after Thursday. The law grants immunity to doctors from civil liability, criminal prosecution and discipline from the state medical and pharmacy boards for advising patients use medical marijuana, discussing the drug with them or monitoring a patient's treatment with marijuana. What police are doing Ohio Fraternal Order of Police President Jay McDonald said the law won't likely change what law enforcement officers do. McDonald, a Marion police officer working on a county-wide drug task force, said that could change after the rules are written.  Until then, McDonald said, officers are likely to take into account an affirmative defense note before making an arrest.  "While it's a defense to be applied in the courtroom, in most cases for affirmative defenses written in state law, the officers take that and apply it on the scene," McDonald said.  What prospective patients are doing Tara Cordle has the start of the marijuana law marked on her calendar with the importance of a family birthday. Cordle hopes cannabis will help her 10-year-old son Waylon, who has intractable epilepsy. Waylon suffers numerous seizures a day despite taking five different medications.  Cordle has collected signatures for every marijuana measure since 2012, including last year's recreational measure, Issue 3. She said she's relieved she won't have to work on yet another failed ballot initiative and the new law is better than nothing. "A lot of people hate the law and think it's not good enough but it's something," Cordle said. "Just having the legislators speaking about it -- that's a huge thing."  Cordle said Waylon's doctors aren't on board yet, but she will try to obtain an affirmative defense note. "When you've been told your son's not going to make it, you do whatever you need to do," Cordle said. "Two years is a life or death situation to a lot of people including my son and I can't justify waiting." What happens next  Sept. 8 starts the clock for several deadlines in the new law:  Oct. 8: The governor and legislative leaders from both parties must appoint 14 members to a new medical marijuana advisory committee by this date. Speaker Cliff Rosenberger issued a call for people interested in representing mental health professionals or patients to send a resume to his office at [email protected] May 6, 2017: The Ohio Department of Commerce must complete rules and regulations for marijuana cultivators, including how many cultivation licenses will be available and how people apply for them.  Sept. 8, 2017: The Ohio Board of Pharmacy must complete rules and regulations for marijuana dispensaries and develop the process for registering patients in the program. The Ohio State Medical Board must decide how Ohio physicians can obtain a certificate to recommend medical marijuana. The Department of Commerce must finish rules and regulations for marijuana processors and testing labs.  Sept. 8, 2018: The program must be "fully operational." Two of the three agencies are staffing up in preparation for the new law and plan to spend about $1.8 million setting up the program.  The state has set up a website, medicalmarijuana.ohio.gov, to provide updates on the regulatory process. Qualifying medical conditions Patients qualify if they have the following conditions: HIV/AIDS; Alzheimer's disease; Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); cancer; chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE); Crohn's disease; epilepsy or another seizure disorder; fibromyalgia; glaucoma; hepatitis C; inflammatory bowel disease; multiple sclerosis; pain that is chronic, severe, and intractable; Parkinson's disease; post traumatic stress disorder; sickle cell anemia; spinal cord disease or injury; Tourette's syndrome; traumatic brain injury; and ulcerative colitis. 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1041 points by The Plain Dealer | Physician Law Cannabis Ulcerative colitis Inflammatory bowel disease Affirmative defense Defense Posttraumatic stress disorder
Getting chatty has made UCLA talk of the town
If recent trends persist, the team that doesn’t like to talk can look back on the time it chattered like teenagers carrying on about the latest photo-sharing app as the moment that changed the trajectory of its season. UCLA had just been throttled by USC on Jan. 25 when the Bruins lingered in their...
4 points by Los Angeles Times | Steve Alford Basketball Talk radio Reggie Miller Shooting guards Pauley Pavilion Defense Basketball position
HIGH SCHOOL BOYS HOCKEY: Corcoran stymies Braintree, leads Walpole to victory
RANDOLPH – With star senior goalie James Corcoran in net, scoring on Walpole is hard enough.When the Rebels turn in a defensive effort like it did Wednesday night against Braintree, it becomes nearly impossible.Walpole stymied the Wamps attack to collect its 11th shutout this season and got just enough offense to pick up a 1-0 Bay State Conference road win at Zapustas Ice Arena.  
58 points by Boston Herald | Coming out Defense 2007 Stanley Cup Playoffs United States Department of Defense Shot glass
Report: Michigan considering Hawaii DC for staff position
Michigan football coach Jim Harbaugh might be filling another position with an overqualified staff member.        
-2 points by Detroit Free Press | Michigan Jim Harbaugh American football University of Michigan United States Michigan Wolverines football Assistant Defense
Brian VanGorder defenses not living up to Notre Dame's investment
SOUTH BEND, Ind. — The numbers don't lie, even if Brian Kelly doesn't want to face the truth publicly, ugly as it is.Let's start with the number four. That's how many games, out of its last five, Notre Dame has lost.The cumulative score of those five games: 178-178.The Irish's lone victory during...
-1 points by Chicago Tribune | Truth Defense
As Bears defense reshuffles, Jerrell Freeman's 'fired-up calmness' a key
Early in the second quarter Monday night, running back Wendell Smallwood slithered out into a screen pattern, a play the Eagles offense hadn't previously put on film. Still, Bears inside linebacker Jerrell Freeman had it read and before Smallwood even turned back toward quarterback Carson Wentz,...
-1 points by Chicago Tribune | American football positions Chicago Bears American football Blitz Linebacker Tampa 2 Defense Tight end
3 decisions that show the elite versatility of Giants defense
Of course they cannot. The Giants will not do much this season if they struggle to score touchdowns on offense and if they continue to turn over the ball more frequently than do their opponents. The Giants are 2-0, yet are minus-four in turnover ratio, with one interception and three lost fumbles on their ledger...
20 points by New York Post | American football Super Bowl XLIV Fumble Touchdown Giant New Orleans Saints Defense Kennard Texas
What the Cardinals are saying about the Patriots this week
As his team prepares to take on the Patriots at home this Sunday night, BArizona Cardinals head coach Bruce Arians had no shortage of respectful things to say about his opponents this week. He started by praising the inherent ability of Jimmy Garoppolo, whom he compared to Tony Romo. “Jimmy’s an excellent athlete, a very […]
64 points by The Boston Globe | New England Patriots Bill Belichick National Football League Defense Peyton Manning Roger Goodell Tight end Tom Brady