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Trump vs Clinton race heats up with two months to go
US election kicks into high gear, with both candidates spending Labour Day in battleground state of Ohio.
1068 points by Al Jazeera English | President of the United States Election United States presidential election 2008 United States presidential election debates Elections Voting United States presidential election Electoral College
French Candidate Says Russia Is Out to Torpedo His Campaign
In the wake of alleged Russian interference in the U.S. presidential election, Emmanuel Macron–a front-runner in France’s presidential race–is accusing Moscow of doing it again.
588 points by The Wall Street Journal | President of the United States United States United States Constitution United States presidential election Washington D.C. Electoral College
Trump to 'look into' reports Flynn discussed U.S. sanctions with Russia
Reports claim Flynn addressed U.S. sanctions with Russia’s ambassador in a phone call late last year.         
-2 points by Arizona Republic | George W. Bush President of the United States United States Russia United States Constitution Associated Press United States presidential election 2008 Electoral College
After Trump video flap, signs warn Orange Coast College students against recording classes without permission
Almost two months after a secretly recorded video of an Orange Coast College professor's postelection comments about President Trump touched off a firestorm, signs reminding students that in-class recordings are prohibited without instructors' permission have been posted for the spring semester....
403 points by Los Angeles Times | University George W. Bush President of the United States Vice President of the United States Democratic Party Professor Electoral College Calvin Coolidge
Mexico finance minister out in shakeup after unpopular Trump visit
MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Mexican Finance Minister Luis Videgaray has stepped down, his ministry said on Wednesday, pushing out of the government the closest ally of President Enrique Pena Nieto, who has been under pressure since Donald Trump's controversial visit last week.
465 points by Reuters | President of the United States Reuters Thomson Reuters United States Washington D.C. United States Constitution News agency Electoral College
At ‘Hamilton’ in New York, Pence gets cheers, boos and a message
Vice President-elect Mike Pence attended "Hamilton" Friday, and one actor read a message to him from the stage, though Pence wasn't around to hear it.
243 points by Chicago Sun-Times | Thomas Jefferson Vice President of the United States Democratic Party Electoral College Franklin D. Roosevelt President of the United States United States Declaration of Independence John Adams
Vice President-elect Mike Pence gets an earful at 'Hamilton' show in New York
Vice President-elect Mike Pence is the latest celebrity to attend the Broadway hit show "Hamilton" — but he was the first to leave with an earful. Actor Brandon Victor Dixon, who plays Aaron Burr, the nation's third vice president, had this message Friday from the stage for his political descendant...
10772 points by Chicago Tribune | Thomas Jefferson Vice President of the United States John Adams Electoral College Aaron Burr George Clinton United States presidential election 1800 President of the United States
Two of the most prominent arguments for the electoral college are completely wrong
The electoral college is promoting, not preventing, tyranny of the majority.
2340 points by The Washington Post | Elections Plurality voting system President of the United States Election Voting system United States Voting Electoral College
The kids aren't all right: Schools and post-vote tensions
"There's something very, very ugly and it is erupting at schools," one expert says.         
13280 points by Arizona Republic | High school Ku Klux Klan Education School New York City President of the United States Election Day Electoral College
The kids aren't all right: Schools and post-election tensions
"There's something very, very ugly and it is erupting at schools," one expert says.         
-2 points by Arizona Republic | High school Ku Klux Klan Education School New York City President of the United States Election Day Electoral College
Electoral College member from Texas might go rogue, says he's undecided
Art Sisneros, one of 538 electors with the final say on who becomes the next U.S. president, says he's undecided on how to vote. The 40-year-old family man from Dayton is among the 38 people chosen to represent Texas in the Electoral College. That group will gather Dec. 19 in 50 state capitols around the country to vote on who wins the election.
959 points by The Houston Chronicle | President of the United States Electoral College United States presidential election 1972 Voting Washington D.C. Elections Faithless elector Democracy
The kids aren't all right: Educators grapple with post-election tensions
"There's something very, very ugly and it is erupting at schools," one expert says.       
13280 points by USA Today | High school Ku Klux Klan Education School New York City President of the United States Election Day Electoral College
Why does the United States use the Electoral College? (And other questions you might have)
The United States Electoral College is kind of like a sports referee — if you're talking about it, then something weird must have happened. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- The United States Electoral College is kind of like a sports referee -- if you're talking about it, then something weird must have happened. This year, Republican Donald Trump won the presidency, even though Democrat Hillary Clinton  received 1.3 million more votes, or about 1 percent more of the popular vote, according to the latest vote totals compiled by the Cook Political Report. But it's not the raw national vote that picks the next president. It's the individual members of the Electoral College who are allocated to each state. And Trump's advantage in the Electoral College, which gives extra weight to swing states like Ohio, means he won the race decisively. This discrepancy has some people asking, what is this Electoral College anyway? What's it all about? People are even protesting about it. Millions have signed a petition urging electors to vote for Clinton instead, no matter how their state voted. You've got questions, we've got answers. For many of them, we spoke with Rob Alexander, a political scientist at Ohio Northern University who has written a book about the role of the Electoral College. Why did the Founding Fathers create the Electoral College? Delegates to the 1787 Constitutional Convention considered a few different systems, including having Congress select the president or having state legislatures do the honors. But they were dismissed as not providing enough separation between the branches of government. Eventually, they came up with the Electoral College system, under which states are allocated electors based on the number of congressional districts they have. "They hoped that this could help get someone who had widespread support across the country as president and vice-president," Alexander said. Today, with two exceptions, whoever wins each state gets all the state's electoral votes. (The oddballs are Nebraska and Maine, which allocate some of their votes based on who wins individual congressional districts.) Why is it still around? There have been more than 900 proposals to either change the Electoral College system or get rid of it altogether, according to Alexander. This includes outgoing Democratic California Sen. Barbara Boxer, who introduced legislation this week to abolish the system. But nothing ever sticks. That's because neither Republicans nor Democrats are ever sure whether changes will hurt them or help them, Alexander said. "That uncertainty makes a lot of people uneasy," he said. "Knowing the rules of the game the way they are now, candidates and campaigns know they can work within that framework." Proponents of the Electoral College, including the cleveland.com/Plain Dealer editorial board, argue that it requires candidates to campaign in a larger variety of states rather than focusing on a few with the most people. Alexander is a skeptic. He said the Electoral College system basically nullifies the votes of anyone who doesn't live in a swing state. He also disagrees with the arguments people generally make in its favor -- he said the most populous states also are representative of the country at large. "I think the candidates would go where the votes are, and in the system we have right now, I think a lot of states are rendered unimportant," he said. How often does a candidate win the popular vote but lose the White House? Not often. Besides this year, it's happened four other times: in 1824, 1876, 1888 and 2000. Who picks the people who serve in the Electoral College? Most states, including Ohio, direct the winning political party to choose who serves in the Electoral College. The Ohio GOP in September picked the electors with input from the Trump campaign. To see a list of the names of Ohio's 18 electors, click here. One elector, a former Trump campaign official named Kathy Miller, will hvave to be replaced. She resigned from her role in September after giving an interview in which she made comments that were widely criticized as racist. The first alternate in line to replace Miller is Bob Paduchik, Trump's Ohio campaign director. The electors will meet in Columbus on Dec. 19 to cast their votes. Under state law, they will be paid $10 a day, plus travel cost reimbursements. On Jan. 6, the U.S. Congress will officially count the electoral votes. Under the results of the election, Trump would be expected to receive 306 electoral votes to Clinton's 232, unless someone changes their vote. Do electors HAVE to cast their vote based on the outcome of the election? Probably not. Twenty-nine states, including Ohio, have laws that require their electors to vote for the state winner. But Ohio law doesn't describe a penalty for those who fail to do so. Some states, like Washington, have laws that punish so-called "faithless electors" with $1,000 fines. Most constitutional law scholars say these laws probably are unconstitutional, but they've never been tested, according to Alexander. As part of his research, Alexander in 2008 got 63 percent of Electoral College members to respond to a survey. Nineteen percent of Republican electors said they considered voting faithlessly, he said. "Which was insane," he said. So does this mean that electors could band together and block Trump? In theory, yes. But in reality, no. While Electoral College members -- including in Ohio -- are being lobbied to change their vote, it's very unlikely that any will. And those who may do so aren't likely to change the outcome of the election. Only seven electors have voted for someone other than the winner of their state since 1960, according to FairVote. Most recently, an anonymous Minnesota Democratic elector in 2004 voted for vice-presidential nominee John Edwards rather than that year's Democratic presidential nominee, John Kerry. Another elector suggested the misvote may have been a mistake. "I think the chances are very, very minimal that [faithless electors] will change the outcome of this election," Alexander said. "Only if something Donald Trump were to do or some new information were to come forward could I see the outcome of this election changing in any form.
26 points by The Plain Dealer | President of the United States Electoral College Voting United States Swing state Elections Election Vice President of the United States
The electoral college isn't a real place, but someone has to answer all the angry phone calls these

-2 points by The Houston Chronicle | Election President of the United States Elections President Electoral College Voting George W. Bush Washington D.C.
Mich. electors cite threats over Trump vote
Oakland University senior Michael Banerian says he has received emails threatening death        
-2 points by The Detroit News | Democratic Party George W. Bush Voting President of the United States Voting system Election Elections Electoral College
The electoral college badly distorts the vote. And it's going to get worse.
Citizens in the least populous states have about 2.5 times more voting power than those in the most populous states.
3450 points by The Washington Post | President of the United States United States presidential election Electoral College Washington D.C. United States Election Elections United States Constitution
Without Tim Kaine, Hillary Clinton might have lost Virginia as well
Kaine's home state advantage was enough to put Clinton over the top in Virginia.
85 points by The Washington Post | President of the United States George W. Bush Democratic Party United States presidential election 2008 United States Senate Electoral College Bill Clinton Hillary Rodham Clinton
In face of death threats, I’m still voting for Trump
As one of the 16 Presidential Electors for Michigan, this last week has left me inundated with dozens of emails and Facebook messages from some of the most vile and hypocritical individuals I have ever encountered.        
-2 points by The Detroit News | Electoral College Election President of the United States Elections United States presidential election Wyoming Voting George W. Bush
Could Electoral College elect Clinton not Trump?
Short answer: It's possible, but highly unlikely.        
-2 points by Detroit Free Press | President of the United States George W. Bush Electoral College Vice President of the United States Washington D.C. United States presidential election United States presidential election 1972 Election Day
Finalists announced in essay contest debating future of Electoral College
FIFTH-GRADER Mallory Toomey said she accidentally predicted the outcome of the 2016 presidential election, noting that Donald Trump might win the Electoral College vote count but Hillary Clinton would win the popular vote.
-1 points by The Philadelphia Inquirer | United States Constitution President of the United States United States presidential election Electoral College Washington D.C. Election Elections Electoral college
Donald Trump was right: The election was rigged. Now it's time to get rid of the electoral college
Donald Trump had it pegged. The election was rigged. Hillary Clinton won the most votes. But Trump won the presidency. It was rigged 229 years ago by the Founding Fathers. They created a convoluted, undemocratic presidential election system that became known as the electoral college. It was part...
15450 points by Los Angeles Times | President of the United States Electoral College Washington D.C. United States Senate Election United States presidential election Elections George W. Bush
Michigan electors cite threats over Trump vote
Oakland University senior Michael Banerian says he has received emails threatening death        
-1 points by The Detroit News | Democratic Party George W. Bush Voting President of the United States Voting system Election Elections Electoral College
For the Record: Trump, Clinton, Florida and the Fed
Will the Fed decide the presidential election today? Is the Donald Trump-Pam Bondi scandal over, or is it just getting started? And why are ...       
23 points by USA Today | President of the United States Electoral College Election Elections Voting Federal Reserve System Swing state Donald Trump
Texas Take: September 20, 2016
Texas Take for Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016
1 points by The Houston Chronicle | President of the United States George W. Bush George H. W. Bush Bill Clinton Republican Party Voting Democratic Party Electoral College
Trump closes in on Clinton's projected electoral lead: Reuters/Ipsos Poll
Republican Donald Trump appears to have carved out a wider path to the White House as a number of states including Florida and Ohio are no longer considered likely wins for Democratic rival Hillary Clinton, according to the latest Reuters/Ipsos States of the Nation project released on Saturday.
1 points by | Voting President of the United States Washington D.C. Vice President of the United States United States Senate Elections Electoral College Democracy
Real-Time Election Day Projections May Upend News Tradition
VoteCastr, a Silicon Valley company, plans to report early election results in key states, raising concerns about an effect on how people vote.
2716 points by The New York Times | Elections Voting President of the United States Swing state Electoral College United States presidential election Opinion poll Poll
How to explain the 2016 election to someone who just tuned in
We have a lot to cover -- and not a lot of time to cover it.
37 points by The Washington Post | President of the United States Barack Obama George W. Bush Voting United States Senate Electoral College Vice President of the United States Bill Clinton