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Donald Trump's emotional intelligence deficit
He has proved deficient in terms of self-control, leaving him unable to move towards the centre for general election.
887 points by Al Jazeera English | Lyndon B. Johnson Intelligence quotient Donald Trump President of the United States Richard Nixon Intelligence Supreme Court of the United States Emotional intelligence
Turning Red: How Texas became a GOP stronghold
Texas was once a Democratic stronghold with roots in the party going back to Sam Houston. That changed starting in the mid-1960s with the signing of the Civil Rights Act. By 1980, the GOP ran the show. But, what does the future hold? 
64 points by The Houston Chronicle | Democratic Party Lyndon B. Johnson Richard Nixon President of the United States United States Senate Republican Party United States House of Representatives Red states and blue states
Five epic apologies from world leaders
Elton John put it simply in 1976: “Sorry seems to be the hardest word to say.”          
-1 points by Arizona Republic | Bill Clinton President of the United States George W. Bush Robert McNamara Lyndon B. Johnson John F. Kennedy Iraq War Barack Obama
Man charged with domestic stabbing in Plainfield
A man was stabbed in a domestic disturbance in southwest suburban Plainfield Wednesday.
17 points by Chicago Sun-Times | Violence Assault Stabbing Penetrating trauma Domestic violence Texas Battery Lyndon B. Johnson
Diary reveals JFK doubted Hitler was really dead & predicted Nazi leader will ‘emerge from hatred’
A young John F Kennedy once pondered over Adolf Hitler’s death, wondering whether the Nazi leader had really died or was still alive, according to a diary he kept while travelling through Europe in 1945. Read Full Article at RT.com
-1 points by Russia Today | John F. Kennedy World War II Franklin D. Roosevelt John F. Kennedy assassination Lyndon B. Johnson Dwight D. Eisenhower Richard Nixon President of the United States
Proposed Medicaid cuts will pit needy groups against each other, advocate fears
Replacing former President Barack Obama’s signature health care reforms would bring the biggest changes ever to the government health care program for people who are poor and disabled, opponents of the replacement bill said Thursday.
12 points by Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | Barack Obama President of the United States United States Health care Democratic Party Lyndon B. Johnson Bill Clinton Illinois
Bryan Cranston-Jennifer Garner Drama ‘Wakefield’ Gets May Release Date
IFC Films has acquired the independent drama “Wakefield,” starring Bryan Cranston and Jennifer Garner, for a May 19 theatrical release and a May 26 VOD launch. The film, which screened at the Telluride and Toronto festivals last year, also stars Jason O’Mara and Beverly D’Angelo. Producers are Julie Lynn, Bonnie Curtis, Wendy Federman, and Carl... Read more »
-1 points by Variety | American film actors American television actors Broadway theatre Lyndon B. Johnson Bryan Cranston Theatre Tony Award Juno
London mayor: 'Cruel' Trump should be denied state visit
LONDON — London's mayor says that President Donald Trump shouldn't receive a state visit in Britain because of his "cruel" policies on immigration.Sadiq Khan said Sunday the U.S. president should not get VIP treatment when he comes to Britain later this year because of his "ban on people from seven Muslim-majorities countries" and his decision to block refugees from entering the United States.Khan said that "in those circumstances we shouldn't be rolling out the red carpet."
-2 points by Boston Herald | United States President of the United States 2003 invasion of Iraq Franklin D. Roosevelt United States Constitution Lyndon B. Johnson War of 1812 Democratic Party
Trump as 'Leader of Free World' attacks free press: Darcy cartoon
Trump and his staff have been prolific in propagating fake news, starting with Trump adopting the racist Obama 'birther' story eight years ago CLEVELAND, Ohio -- President Donald Trump, the so-called 'Leader of the Free World' escalated his attack on the free press with two repugnant tweets calling US news organizations the "enemy of the American People!" Trump first tweeted: "The FAKE NEWS media (failing @nytimes, @CNN,@NBCNews and many more) is not my enemy, it is the enemy of the American people. SICK!" That tweet was deleted and replaced 16 minutes later with this amended version: "The FAKE NEWS media (failing @nytimes, @NBCNews, @ABC,@CBS,@CNN) is not my enemy, it is the enemy of the American People!" Trump's tweets read like they could have been written by Richard Nixon at the height of Watergate or any Authoritarian and Fascist leader throughout history. "The Press is the enemy, the establishment is the enemy, the professors are the enemy."   --President Richard Nixon Carl Bernstein, who along with Bob Woodward, won the Pulitzer Prize for exposing Nixon's misdeeds, called Trump's attacks on the press "more treacherous than Nixon's." "The most dangerous 'enemy of the people is presidential lying--always.  Attacks on press by @realDonaldTrump more treacherous than Nixon's."  --Carl Bernstein On "Meet the Press" Senator John Mcain said Trump's attacks on the press are how dictators get started. "If you want to preserve democracy as we know it, you have to have a free and many times adversarial press.  And without it, I am afraid that we would lose so much of our individual liberties over time.  That's how dictators get started.   They get started by suppressing free press, in other words, consolidation of power-- when you look at history, the first thing that dictators do is shut down the press," McCain told Chuck Todd, in an interview airing today. Do Trump and Steve Bannon really want to "preserve democracy" or do they want to establish a Trumpocracy and Bannonocray? Last year, Trump's ghostwriter, Tony Schwartz,  said Trump's first move as president would be to target the free press. "On day one he would end a free press.  In any way that he could, he would use the government to shut down a free press, and listen, he has plenty of precedent for doing that, including his hero Vladimir Putin, " Schwartz told The Independent. Here is what John F. Kennedy, Teddy Roosevelt and Thomas Jefferson had to say on the topic. "Without debate, without criticism, no Administration and no country can succeed-- and no republic can survive."  --John F. Kennedy - "To announce that there must be no criticism of the President, or that we are to stand by the President right or wrong...is morally treasonable to the American public."  -- Theodore Roosevelt "Our liberty cannot be guarded but by the freedom of the press, nor that be limited without danger of losing it."   -- Thomas Jefferson. American journalist James Foley was beheaded by ISIS.  Does Trump think Foley is an enemy of the American people?  Would he dare say that in person to Foley's parents? While Donald Trump was getting dubious deferments to stay out of the Vietnam war and stay in New York City nightclubs, Dan Rather and plenty of other American reporters were embedded with American forces in Vietnam.   Was Rather an enemy of the American people then?  Are all the journalist who were and are embedded with American forces in Iraq, Afghanistan and Syria, enemies of the American people? The Journalist Memorial at the Newseum in Washington D.C., names 2,291 journalist who have been killed covering the news around the world. Trump can be considered an authority on 'Fake News'.   He's not only Commander-in-Chief, he's been the Editor-in-Chief of Fake News.   When Trump talks about Fake News he's talking about himself, his favorite topic.   Trump and his staff have been prolific in propagating fake news, starting with Trump adopting the racist Obama 'birther' story eight years ago. During the Republican primary, Trump spread a story about Ted Cruz's father being involved with Lee Harvey Oswald in the assassination of JFK. Since being sworn in, Trump and his staff have sworn that Trump's Inauguration crowd was the largest in history, that 3 to 4 million people voted illegally, and that Iraqi nationals carried out a massacre in Bowling Green, Kentucky. While on the National Security Advisers staff, Michael Flynn Jr, spread a fake story that Hillary Clinton and her campaign staff were running a child sex ring from the basement of a D.C. pizza parlor.   The fake story prompted a man to open fire in the pizza parlor. On Air Force One, Trump falsely reported he knew nothing about the report that Michael Flynn talked to the Russians about sanctions, and misled Vice President Mike Pence.   Trump knew the information back in January. During his chaotic press conference last week, Trump boldly bragged that he had the largest Electoral College victory in history.  The false claim was debunked in the press conference. Trump's outlandish  attacks on the press, only give more credence to what's being reported. President Trump has been consumed with trying to kill the messenger.   He needs to put that energy and effort into doing what he was elected to do -- govern, as a dignified leader of the United States, with a sound mind and principles, without denigrating its free press and without lying to the  American people. Photo from "My Vietnam Experience" blog showing 'last rites' being given to Dickey Chapelle, the first American female reporter killed in combat.Jeff Darcy, cleveland.com  The photo above is taken from Dan Rather's 2014 post on the "My Vietnam Experience" blog.   The photo shows Chaplain John McNamara administering the last rite to photojournalist Dickey Chapelle in South Vietnam on November 4, 1965.   Chapelle became the first American female reporter to be killed in action.  She was covering a U.S. Marine unit when she and four Marines were wounded by an exploding mine.   Chapelle died in the helicopter flying her to the hospital.    I've cropped the photo to not to show her face, out of respect. What was Donald Trump doing on November 4, 1965?
1 points by The Plain Dealer | President of the United States John F. Kennedy Richard Nixon Vietnam War Lyndon B. Johnson Thomas Jefferson Theodore Roosevelt Gerald Ford
Katy Burns: In times like these, laughter helps
Okay, so the Dems lost the presidency. And the Senate. The House. The Supreme Court. A huge swath of state capitols – well, pretty much everything. But, hey, guys, look on the bright side.You’ve pretty much cornered the humor market.Yep, Republicans (and conservatives generally) have for years had...
1 points by Concord Monitor | Smothers Brothers Lyndon B. Johnson President of the United States White House Stephen Colbert The Smothers Brothers Show CBS American comedians
Will President Trump ever release his tax returns?
Trump is the first major party nominee in decades to not release tax returns. What happens now that he's president? Does Flynn's resignation change things? Plus, Rep. Bill Pascrell Jr. (D-N.J.) on Democrats' efforts to make Trump's returns public.
2 points by The Washington Post | Dwight D. Eisenhower President of the United States Richard Nixon Vice President of the United States Harry S. Truman John F. Kennedy United States presidential election 1952 Lyndon B. Johnson
Europe must not bow to U.S. spending demands on NATO: EU's Juncker
MUNICH, Germany (Reuters) - European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker said on Thursday that Europe must not cave in to U.S demands to raise military spending, arguing that development and humanitarian aid could also count as security.
-2 points by Reuters | United States NATO Reuters United States Department of Defense Thomson Reuters Joint Chiefs of Staff Lyndon B. Johnson President of the United States
Letter: Just like Nixon
Just like NixonThe president and his minions have accused us of widespread and longtime voter fraud. All traditional and respected institutions have repeatedly said this is not true. All of our institutions are based on the vote. There is no greater crime against these United States than undermining...
-2 points by Concord Monitor | President of the United States Crimes Sociology United States Richard Nixon Plurality voting system Gerald Ford Lyndon B. Johnson
Black History Month: Take a walking tour of Compton architecture
Years after designing Compton City Hall, African American architect Harold Williams said he was determined to bring well-crafted architecture to the community because “all people deserve quality architecture.” In honor of Black History Month, the Los Angeles chapter of the American Institute of...
207 points by Los Angeles Times | Martin Luther King Jr. African American Lyndon B. Johnson African-American architects American Institute of Architects Southern United States United States Jim Crow laws
Former Anniston Star editor Paul Rilling dies
ANNISTON, Ala. (AP) - Former Anniston Star editor Paul Rilling has died. The east Alabama newspaper reports that the longtime journalist died Sunday at a health care facility in Anniston. He was 94. Rilling worked as a writer and editor at The Star from 1973 until 1989. He taught and ...
-2 points by The Washington Times | Lyndon B. Johnson Alabama Supreme Court of the United States Civil and political rights Richard Nixon Hubert Humphrey History of African-American civil rights United States
New polls show divide on Trump's travel ban
A wave of new polls show how divided Americans are about President Trump's travel ban.
25 points by The Washington Post | Funk United States President of the United States New York City Franklin D. Roosevelt Standing wave Lyndon B. Johnson United States Constitution
Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch’s criticism of Trump may be winning him Democratic support
Senate Democrats sent mixed signals the day after Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch expressed concerns about President Trump's attacks on the federal judiciary - a sign that the judge's comments could attract some badly needed Democratic support.
1 points by The Denver Post | United States Senate Party leaders of the United States Senate Democratic Party President of the United States Mitch McConnell Chuck Schumer Lyndon B. Johnson Dianne Feinstein
Gorsuch's criticism of Trump may be winning him Democratic support
Senate Democrats sent mixed signals the day after Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch expressed concerns about President Trump's attacks on the federal judiciary - a sign that the judge's comments could attract some badly needed Democratic support. "To whisper to a senator but to refuse to say anything...
54 points by Chicago Tribune | United States Senate Party leaders of the United States Senate Democratic Party President of the United States Mitch McConnell Chuck Schumer Lyndon B. Johnson Dianne Feinstein
Berlin: Open Road picks up “Finding Steve McQueen” at EFM
Open Road Films has acquired all U.S. distribution rights to Mark Steven Johnson’s “Finding Steve McQueen.” The heist movie, which Open Road plans to release wide in 2018, stars Travis Fimmel, Forest Whitaker, William Fichtner and Rachael Taylor. The film was introduced to buyers at the European Film Market in Berlin by AMBI Distribution, the... Read more »
2 points by Variety | Richard Nixon Lyndon B. Johnson Film President of the United States American film actors Gerald Ford Supreme Court of the United States Producer
UPI Almanac for Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017
By United Press International On Feb. 9, 1984, Soviet President Yuri Andropov, in power for just 15 months, died at age 69.
8 points by UPI | United States Lyndon B. Johnson John Walker Lindh President of the United States Barack Obama Joseph McCarthy Democratic Party Soviet Union
Chris Kennedy announces run for governor, says 'comprise is not surrender' in dig at Rauner
Chicago businessman Chris Kennedy will join the Democratic race for Illinois governor, officially filing paperwork with the state later Wednesday, campaign aides to the son of the late Robert F. Kennedy said. "Today I am announcing my run for governor because I love Illinois," Kennedy said in a...
10756 points by Chicago Tribune | Chicago Illinois Democratic Party John F. Kennedy Lyndon B. Johnson Barack Obama Ronald Reagan Indiana
Republicans vote to rebuke Elizabeth Warren for impugning Sessions’s character
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., led a party-line rebuke Thursday night of Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., for her speech opposing attorney general nominee Jeff Sessions, striking down her words for impugning the Alabama senator's character.
1161 points by The Denver Post | United States Senate John F. Kennedy Coretta Scott King Martin Luther King Jr. Mitch McConnell Jimmy Carter United States Lyndon B. Johnson
Elizabeth Warren rebuked for quoting Coretta Scott King while debating Jeff Sessions' nomination
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., led a party-line rebuke Thursday night of Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., for her speech opposing attorney general nominee Jeff Sessions, striking down her words for impugning the Alabama senator's character. In an extraordinarily rare move, McConnell...
-2 points by Chicago Tribune | United States Senate John F. Kennedy Coretta Scott King Martin Luther King Jr. Mitch McConnell Jimmy Carter United States Lyndon B. Johnson
Republicans vote to rebuke Elizabeth Warren for impugning Sessions's character
In an extraordinarily rare move, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell interrupted Warren's speech, saying she had breached Senate rules by reading past statements against Sessions from the late senator Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.) and the late Coretta Scott King.
54606 points by The Washington Post | United States Senate John F. Kennedy Coretta Scott King Martin Luther King Jr. Mitch McConnell Jimmy Carter United States Lyndon B. Johnson
Texas Senate approves new University of Texas regents
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) - The Texas Senate has confirmed Gov. Greg Abbott's three nominees for the University of Texas System Board of Regents. Tuesday night's 29-0 vote with two abstentions means Former UT regent Janiece Longoria, ex-state Sen. Kevin Eltife and businessman Rad Weaver will serve six-year terms. Abstaining were ...
-2 points by The Washington Times | Texas Texas Senate Austin Texas United States University of Texas System Lyndon B. Johnson United States Senate Democracy
Austin tops list of 100 Best Places to Live in the U.S.
Allen ConeFeb. 7 (UPI) -- Austin, Texas, was ranked No. 1 on the U.S. News and World Report's list of the 100 Best Places to Live in America.
73 points by UPI | Metropolitan area Population Stevie Ray Vaughan Demography Lyndon B. Johnson Texas University of Texas at Austin Austin Texas
Trump, GOP Congress pursue most ambitious agenda since 1960s
President Trump and the Republicans have an opportunity to pass sweeping legislation, much like LBJ and Democrats did in enacting the Great Society. But there are obstacles.
-2 points by The Philadelphia Inquirer | Lyndon B. Johnson United States Congress President of the United States United States Senate Republican Party United States House of Representatives Congress Democratic Party
‘Santa shooter’ says defending his life was costly
Marcus Weldon said defending his life cost him thousands of dollars, his reputation and a few relationships        
-2 points by The Detroit News | Santa Claus Gun Firearm Father Christmas Mrs. Claus Cannon Lyndon B. Johnson NORAD Tracks Santa
Queen's 65-year reign a milestone in a record-breaking life
LONDON (AP) - On Monday, Queen Elizabeth II marks her Sapphire Jubilee, becoming the first British monarch to reign for 65 years. It's just one of many milestones the queen has marked in her nine decades. Here's are some other significant numbers about her record-breaking life and reign: - Elizabeth ...
-2 points by The Washington Times | Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom Winston Churchill British Empire President of the United States Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Lyndon B. Johnson Prince Philip Duke of Edinburgh George VI of the United Kingdom
White House whoppers: Six times a president misled the public
There is a long history of presidents misleading the public, sometimes unwittingly and other times on purpose. Here are six occasions in recent history when occupants of the Oval Office proved less than truthful. Lyndon B. Johnson and the Gulf of Tonkin incident Late on the night of Aug. 4, 1964,...
817 points by Los Angeles Times | President of the United States George W. Bush Ronald Reagan Bill Clinton Richard Nixon Lyndon B. Johnson Democratic Party Barack Obama
Japan supports but won’t join US ‘freedom of navigation’ patrols in South China Sea
Japanese Self Defense forces will not participate in US military patrols in the vicinity of South China Sea, the country Defense Minister clarified, a day after US and Japan agreed to enhance engagement in the disputed maritime region. Read Full Article at RT.com
1199 points by Russia Today | South China Sea United States Department of Defense Spratly Islands Philippines Pacific Ocean Joint Chiefs of Staff Southeast Asia Lyndon B. Johnson
U.S. Defense Chief Reassures South Korea, Japan
As U.S. President Donald Trump threatens to overturn ties with America’s global allies, his defense minister gave an assurance to two Asian countries that depend on U.S. military support: we won’t abandon you.
65 points by The Wall Street Journal | United States Department of Defense Japan United States Lyndon B. Johnson President of the United States United States Marine Corps Gerald Ford Franklin D. Roosevelt
Immigration crackdowns' dark side: Stephanie Hinnershitz (Opinion)
President Donald Trump would have us believe that his executive order on immigration is in our country's best interest to protect from terrorist attacks but it's part of a long history of economically inspired crackdowns, writes history professor Stephanie Hinnershitz. Stephanie Hinnershitz is an assistant professor at Cleveland State University.Stephanie Hinnershitz  CLEVELAND -- "Once I thought to write a history of the immigrants in America," the late historian Oscar Handlin wrote in 1951. "Then, I discovered that the immigrants were American history." Every historian of immigration knows this quote. It provides an uplifting message, signaling the central place of immigrants in our nation's rich history. The celebratory nature of the poor, huddled masses yearning to breath free and arriving in the land of liberty was Handlin's own response to his times, primarily the escalating Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union. When compared to the oppressive Soviet regime, the United States offered freedom. But immigration historians such as myself also know that there is a darker side to Handlin's message. American immigration policy has two faces: the rhetoric and the reality. Indeed, while Handlin was celebrating the European immigrants who came to the United States, America's immigration policies were still shaped by the restrictive race and nationality-based quotas of the Immigration Act of 1924, which prohibited large numbers of Asian migrants from coming to the United States. When Congress passed the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952, which emphasized family reunification and pointed toward a more progressive policy, the same act made it easier to deport those suspected of political subversion during the Red Scare, decimating labor unions that promoted the rights of overworked and underpaid minorities. When President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 and abolished the quotas from 1924, many Americans lauded what they perceived to be the immigration equivalent of the civil rights legislation of the era. However, the same act placed the Western hemisphere on a quota system for the first time while prioritizing those immigrants who were highly skilled and educated -- resulting in an immigration policy that provided employers with a steady stream of easily exploited and undocumented migrants. And while "progressive" politicians call for humane immigration reform, both documented and undocumented immigrants are confined to for-profit detention centers with inhumane conditions while they face the uncertainty of their status in the United States. Immigration policy is a reflection of foreign and domestic issues. President Donald Trump would have us believe that his recent executive order banning refugees and those from seven predominantly Muslim nations is in our country's best interest to protect us from Islamic State-inspired terrorist attacks and to prove that America is taking important steps to protect its borders. Read more: Cleveland Clinic CEO Toby Cosgrove, under pressure to challenge Trump's ban, among tech execs to meet with president today The rhetoric (though not necessarily the "shining city upon a hill" image that others hoped to promote with immigration policy) for Trump and those who support his immigration policies is that America is under attack at home and abroad. But the reality of the policies' effects deserves historical context. Considering the rhetoric/reality model, perhaps the most appropriate historical comparison to Trump's policies is the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, which effectively barred Chinese manual laborers from entering the United States. Around the time of the Panic of 1873 (coincidentally), politicians, union leaders, and other Americans who felt economically threatened by the Chinese who arrived in larger numbers after the Civil War to work in mining and on railroads pushed for the ban in order to protect their economic livelihoods. Or so they thought. Chinese continued to enter the United States (though in smaller numbers) and Americans continued to complain about labor competition, of "yellow invasions" (later from both the Japanese and Filipinos), and dangerous immigrants more generally. The reality was that Americans continued to feel threatened as wave after wave of xenophobic panic accompanied wave after wave of immigrants -- many who came to meet labor needs in industry and agriculture. Immigration policies did not succeed in protecting Americans from their nation's own failures.    President Trump's most recent immigration policies are power plays that are reminiscent of the Chinese Exclusion Act (which was eventually repealed during World War II when the Chinese were our allies). Trump, like many leaders before him, is using immigration policy as a distraction from our own economic, political, diplomatic, and social problems -- with disastrous legal results and a devastating impact on human lives. Cleveland Clinic doctor removed from U.S. under Trump's immigration ban says feds misled her Immigration policies are not magic cures. The rhetoric and the reality never fully meet and are often in direct contradiction with each other, as Trump's policies demonstrate. Until the current and future administrations view immigration policy as one part of our entire political, social, and economic structure and all of its strengths and weaknesses, immigration history will continue to be American history -- but a far darker narrative than what Handlin envisioned. Stephanie Hinnershitz is an assistant professor in the department of history at Cleveland State University. The views expressed are her own. *********** Have something to say about this topic? Use the comments to share your thoughts, and stay informed when readers reply to your comments by using the Notification Settings (in blue) just below.
204 points by The Plain Dealer | Immigration to the United States United States Immigration Lyndon B. Johnson World War II Illegal immigration Soviet Union Trade union
Trump promises to 'totally destroy' the Johnson Amendment

13 points by The Houston Chronicle | Lyndon B. Johnson Taxation in the United States Internal Revenue Service Tax Christianity IRS tax forms President of the United States Religion
Trump vows to 'destroy' federal law banning political action by nonprofits
Doug G. WareFeb. 2 (UPI) -- President Trump didn't get any support from nonprofit religious groups during last year's campaign, but he said Thursday he wants to change that for 2020.
70 points by UPI | Non-profit organization United States Lyndon B. Johnson Taxation in the United States President of the United States United Press International Charitable organization Non-profit organizations
State revokes license of dentist whose care caused girl's brain damage
The Texas State Board of Dental Examiners Friday voted to permanently revoke the license of Dr. Bethaniel Jefferson, whose licensed has been temporarily suspended since January, when the incident occurred. The revocation will become final in 25 days.
2 points by The Houston Chronicle | Texas Traumatic brain injury Administrative law judge U.S. state United States Mississippi River Muscle contraction Lyndon B. Johnson
By recent standards, the 2016 election was surprisingly normal
A look at a century of election results.
23 points by The Washington Post | President of the United States Bill Clinton Barack Obama Democratic Party Lyndon B. Johnson Richard Nixon George McGovern United States presidential election 1972
Letter: Awaiting recognition
Awaiting recognitionIn 1943, the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps came into being. In 1945, President Truman issued an executive order declaring the Cadet Nurse Corps, under the umbrella of the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service, to be a military unit for the duration of the war.We were the...
1 points by Concord Monitor | Nita Lowey President of the United States Franklin D. Roosevelt Lyndon B. Johnson United States Congress Flag of the United States Brigadier General United States
Why young people are 'focus of hate'

178 points by CNN | African American Racism United States Barack Obama Lyndon B. Johnson Michelle Obama Martin Luther King Jr. Jim Crow laws
Hillary Clinton collects over 1M popular votes ahead of Trump
Hillary Clinton now leads the popular vote for President by more than 1 million votes.
8852 points by Daily News | Elections John F. Kennedy Vice President of the United States Hubert Humphrey Richard Nixon Lyndon B. Johnson Bill Clinton President of the United States
Obituary: Melvin Laird / Nixon’s secretary of defense and 9-term congressman
Melvin Robert Laird, who as President Richard Nixon’s secretary of defense ended the draft, created the all-volunteer armed forces and ordered the Pentagon’s drawdown of military personnel from the Vietnam War, died Wednesday. He was 94.
3 points by Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | Richard Nixon Gerald Ford President of the United States Lyndon B. Johnson John F. Kennedy Vietnam War United States Department of Defense United States House of Representatives
New African American history museum holds few MLK artifacts
ATLANTA (AP) — The National Museum of African American History and Culture opens in Washington this weekend aiming to tell the story of black people in the U.S. through compelling artifacts.
-1 points by Arizona Daily Star | African American Martin Luther King Jr. Lyndon B. Johnson Southern United States Jim Crow laws Washington D.C. Race United States
Howard University cheerleaders kneel during National Anthem
Howard is one of the country's few historically black universities.
1370 points by Daily News | The Star-Spangled Banner American football African American Lyndon B. Johnson United States Washington D.C. Historically black colleges and universities San Francisco 49ers
African Americans are 'in the worst shape they’ve ever been,' Trump says in North Carolina
"We're going to rebuild our inner cities because our African-American communities are absolute in the worst shape they've ever been in before. Ever, ever, ever,” Trump said during a campaign event in North Carolina.
2440 points by The Washington Post | African American Democratic Party Barack Obama Black people Jim Crow laws United States Lyndon B. Johnson African diaspora
Brace for October Surprise
As September comes to an end, presidential-election observers are beginning to wonder if there will be an October Surprise. In a campaign where the unexpected has become normalized, both parties -- but particularly Democrats -- suspect that the next month could bring a shocking revelation.
705 points by CNN | Richard Nixon President of the United States Ronald Reagan George H. W. Bush Lyndon B. Johnson Jimmy Carter George W. Bush Bill Clinton
Martin Luther King Jr. stabbed during a book signing in 1958
Martin Luther King Jr. was stabbed by Izola Ware Curry in a crowded Harlem department store.
71 points by Daily News | Martin Luther King Jr. African American Police commissioner Montgomery Bus Boycott Izola Curry Lyndon B. Johnson Attack Montgomery Alabama
A stunned Rami Malek, a teary Julia Louis-Dreyfus and other memorable Emmys moments
Emmys 2016: Tatiana Maslany, Rami Malek, 'Game of Thrones' and Jimmy Kimmel lead a gala that reflects TV's bold new age Sept. 19, 2016, 3 a.m. "Game of Thrones" won best drama series at the 2016 Primetime Emmy Awards, while "Veep" took home the top comedy award."The People v. O.J. Simpson: American...
86 points by Los Angeles Times | Primetime Emmy Award Emmy Award O. J. Simpson murder case American film actors Gedde Watanabe Sixteen Candles Lyndon B. Johnson American television actors
John Lewis to receive Liberty Medal for civil rights work
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — U.S. Rep. John Lewis of Georgia will be honored Monday night with Philadelphia's Liberty Medal for his dedication to civil rights.
-1 points by Arizona Daily Star | Martin Luther King Jr. United States Democracy Civil and political rights Law Lyndon B. Johnson Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution Rights
Paper backs Clinton after 75 years of GOP support
The Dallas Morning News has not endorsed a Democrat since before World War II.        
-1 points by Detroit Free Press | Lyndon B. Johnson Richard Nixon President of the United States Democratic Party John McCain Hillary Rodham Clinton United States presidential election 1964 Bill Clinton
'Dallas Morning News' endorses Clinton after decades of backing Republicans
The Dallas Morning News has not endorsed a Democrat since before World War II.       
8526 points by USA Today | Lyndon B. Johnson Richard Nixon President of the United States Democratic Party John McCain Hillary Rodham Clinton United States presidential election 1964 Bill Clinton