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Vote for Lakewood Hospital issue on Nov. 8 ballot to keep city strong: Jennifer Pae (Opinion)
During 2015, Lakewood's elected officials had a tough decision to make. The decision was the future of the community's century old hospital. It has not been operated by the City since 1986 when voters overwhelmingly decided to get out of the city hospital business. The City leased the hospital building to the Lakewood Hospital Association (LHA). Jennifer Pae is director of finance for the city of LakewoodJennifer Pae  Do you know what will make Lakewood strong? You can make Lakewood strong by voting on Nov. 8 for the ballot issue to uphold the ordinance supporting the transition of Lakewood Hospital. Anything else will detrimental to our city.  A vote against the ballot issue will not "save" the hospital, but will ensure entanglement in expensive litigation on the taxpayers' dime for an indeterminable amount of time. The legally binding contract has already been executed. At risk is more than $100 million of investment in health care currently underway. The claims that the transition has economically devastated this community are simply not true. The city's tax collections are higher now than at the same point last year even after the hospital's inpatient services ended on Feb. 5. The emergency department and outpatient services still continue to operate at the facility. Read more: Mayor Michael Summers describes 'orderly wind down' of Lakewood Hospital inpatient services During 2015, Lakewood's elected officials had a tough decision to make. The decision was the future of the community's century-old hospital. The hospital had not been operated by the city since 1986, when voters overwhelmingly decided to get out of the city hospital business. The city leased the hospital building to the Lakewood Hospital Association (LHA). In order to pacify the bondholders of outstanding hospital debt, the city retained title to the properties in case LHA defaulted on the bond payments. Ten years later, in 1996, LHA entered into an agreement with one of the best hospital systems in the United States, the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, to fold its operations into CCF's system. The hospital financially struggled over the years and needed significant capital improvements, while changes in health care delivery reduced the number of inpatient stays. LHA and CCF drastically cut expenditures, and to increase revenues, brought in a lucrative orthopedic practice from Lorain County. However, this was a temporary fix because that practice was moving back once the CCF facility opened there.    LHA knew it had to act, and it worked with CCF to develop a nonbinding proposal for a new outpatient facility ensuring top-quality medical care and continuation of a 24/7/365 emergency department. LHA would use its remaining funds to pay for the transition, establish a community-run health and wellness foundation, and provide the city with funds to redevelop the former hospital site, which is a prime downtown location. Using the recommendations from two separate consulting firms, Subsidium and Huron, which each described the competitive Northeast Ohio health care market; the emphasis on outpatient care as a result of the Affordable Care Act; and the limited availability of doctors in the area, as well as information from dozens of public meetings, our elected officials had the following options: 1. Negotiate a better deal than originally proposed by CCF and legally enter into an agreement to construct and operate the new facility, since the city still had title to the properties. 2. Hold LHA to its lease with the city, which would have expired in 2026, and let another mayor and city council worry about it. This would have not prevented LHA from declaring bankruptcy. 3. Believe that the MetroHealth System would run Lakewood Hospital even though its CEO notified city officials -- not once, but twice -- that it was no longer interested in pursuing a prior proposal due to that organization's shift in focus to outpatient expansion. 4. Pursue an 11th-hour proposal that offered few specifics from a Nashville-based medical management business that highlighted they are simply a turnkey operation and have no presence in Northeast Ohio. 5. Become party to the $400 million taxpayer lawsuit filed by five residents, which would mean the city would be suing itself at the expense of all other residents with no guarantee that the result will be continued health and emergency care within the city. More on lawsuit: Lakewood spends more than $125,000 defending Lakewood Hospital lawsuit 6. Take back the hospital from LHA, and issue a request for proposals hoping any system other than CCF would respond, with no guarantee of continued health and emergency care within the city. By choosing Option 1, our elected officials realized the significant risk they would put the community in if they pursued any one of the other options. A vote FOR the referendum will uphold their tough decision. A vote against will not strengthen our great city. Jennifer Pae is director of finance for the city of Lakewood.
127 points by The Plain Dealer | Health care Medicine Health insurance Health Urgent care Massachusetts
Bel Air finance director honored for town employee health and wellness programs
Bel Air Finance Director Lisa Moody is in charge of looking after the Town of Bel Air's budget, but she has taken on an additional effort in the past decade, looking after the health and well being of her co-workers. She was honored for that effort Tuesday evening with the Silver HEAL Leader award...
-1 points by Baltimore Sun | Health Nutrition Health care Municipality Personal life Medicine City Public health
Marylanders face hefty rate increases for Obamacare
The cost of health insurance plans offered under the Affordable Care Act will jump 20 percent or more next year under rates to be announced Friday by Maryland regulators. The CEO of Maryland's largest insurer defended the hefty rate increases and said the federal law that expanded health insurance...
2115 points by Baltimore Sun | Preferred provider organization Cost Health insurance Health care Insurance Health economics Reimbursement Medicine
Health perks of pet ownership
Living with an animal can help people mentally, physically and emotionally.        
136 points by Detroit Free Press | Dog Health care Health Health economics Pet Medicine Dog park Public health
South Carolina Vet Administration holds mental health summit
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) - The South Carolina Veterans Health Administration is hosting its fifth community mental health summit and inviting those who assist veterans to attend. VA clinical psychologist Michelle Andra says the event scheduled for Friday focuses on suicide prevention efforts and ways to increase veterans' access to mental ...
-1 points by The Washington Times | South Carolina United States Department of Veterans Affairs Psychology Medicine Veterans Health Administration Mental health professional Mental health English-language films
Collision between bus, pickup, auto-rickshaw leaves three dead in Comilla
Three people have been killed and at least four others injured after a collision between a bus, a pickup and an auto-rickshaw in Comilla's Chouddagram.
133 points by | Road Medicine Faisal of Saudi Arabia Medical school The Road Comilla Freeway Accident
New electrical stimulation therapy can help stroke patients move paralyzed hand
Dennis Thompson, HealthDay News Electrical stimulation therapy can help rewire the brain and restore some dexterity to a hand that's been paralyzed by stroke, a new clinical trial shows.
103 points by UPI | Stroke United Press International Nervous system William Randolph Hearst Medicine Central nervous system Brain News World Communications
Targeted doc a giant among peers
Letters to the editor
-1 points by Las Vegas Review-Journal | Hillary Rodham Clinton Bill Clinton United States Secretary of State United States Senate election in New York 2006 Barack Obama Medicine Chelsea Clinton Tropical cyclone
Teen wants to die. These groups are saying no.
Several groups have asked for child-protection authorities to investigate the case.         
6496 points by Arizona Republic | Disability Health care Medicine Spinal muscular atrophy Health care provider Muscle Self-advocacy Illness
MI Senate OKs medical marijuana reform bills
Eight years after voters approved marijuana for medical use, the Senate OK’d a package of bills to regulate the industry        
-1 points by The Detroit News | Cannabis United States Senate Legality of cannabis by country Hashish Tetrahydrocannabinol Medicine Physician Global Marijuana March
Mich. Senate OKs medical marijuana reform bills
Eight years after voters approved marijuana for medical use, the Senate OK’d a package of bills to regulate the industry        
-1 points by The Detroit News | Cannabis United States Senate Legality of cannabis by country Hashish Tetrahydrocannabinol Medicine Physician Global Marijuana March
Advocacy group pushes transparency in drug pricing
A coalition of Maryland health care advocates want to require drug companies to explain why medications cost so much and to empower the state's attorney general to investigate pharmaceutical companies for allegations of price gouging. The Maryland Citizens' Health Initiative announced Thursday...
-1 points by Baltimore Sun | Pharmacology Clinical trial Price Medicine Pharmacy Pricing Pharmaceutical industry Pharmaceutical drug
Why insurance denies your claim, but pays your neighbor's
Tracey Stahl lost part of a leg to bone cancer last fall, and she has to wince through bouts of crippling pain from an ill-fitting artificial limb because of a strange health insurance limit: Her plan covers just one limb per lifetime.She now has to weigh whether to dump the nearly $9,000 cost of a new leg on her credit card as she fights her insurance company over the restriction. "I feel — it's embarrassing to say — paralyzed about what to do," said Stahl, from her home in Penfield, New York.
-1 points by Boston Herald | Insurance Health insurance Health care Health economics Deductible Medicine Obesity Disability insurance
Costs not all that ails Obamacare exchanges
Proving identity can be harder than paying for insurance for some.         
-1 points by Arizona Republic | Insurance Immigration Health care Health insurance Health Medicine Federal government Self-funded health care
Man formally charged with vehicular homicide in death of Denver Post reporter
A 23-year-old Denver man has been charged with two counts of vehicular homicide while driving recklessly and drunken driving in the death of Denver Post reporter Colleen O'Connor, according to a news release by Denver District Attorney Mitch Morrissey's office.
7 points by The Denver Post | Newspaper Associated Press U.S. state Alcoholic beverage Utah Salt Lake City Medicine Crime
Seattle hospital to open gender clinic for transgender youth
SEATTLE (AP) - Transgender youth will have a place to go for coordinated medical care when a new clinic opens at Seattle Children's Hospital next month. KING-TV reports (http://goo.gl/pDovJa ) that doctors trained in transgender care will provide services to transgender kids entering puberty at the hospital's new Gender Clinic. ...
2 points by The Washington Times | Medicine Hospital Physician Transgender Health care Gender Surgery Puberty
Rosie O’Donnell delivers encouraging update on daughter after ‘overdose’
Earlier this week that Chelsea was taken to Long Island hospital after overdosing on drugs.
33 points by New York Post | Drug overdose Barbiturate Psychiatry Naloxone Benzodiazepine overdose Medicine Suicide methods Drugs
Why insurance denies your claim, but pays your neighbor’s
Tracey Stahl lost part of a leg to bone cancer last fall, and she has to wince through an ill-fitting artificial limb because of a health insurance limit: Her plan covers just one limb per lifetime.
1 points by The Denver Post | Insurance Health insurance Health care Health economics Medicine Deductible Obesity Disability insurance
Can I lose weight intermittent fasting?
While fasting for 16-hour intervals might sound like a great way to drop pounds, some results of a popular diet trend don’t entirely prove t...       
80 points by USA Today | Nutrition Health Dieting Weight loss Obesity Medicine Eating Fasting
Costs not all that ails Obamacare exchanges: Try proving legal status
Proving identity can be harder than paying for insurance for some.       
159 points by USA Today | Insurance Immigration Health care Health insurance Health Medicine Federal government Self-funded health care
Academic hospital forms partnership with Hays hospital
LAWRENCE, Kan. (AP) - Kansas' only academic hospital is working with a hospital in the western part of the state to improve rural health care. The Kansas City Star (http://bit.ly/2c9W0rz ) reports that leaders of the University of Kansas Hospital and Hays Medical Center signed a letter Wednesday formalizing the ...
-1 points by The Washington Times | Kansas Lawrence Kansas Kansas City Missouri Health Health insurance Health care Medicine Sociology
Former nursing assistant sentenced for assaulting patient
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) - A former Licensed Nursing Assistant has been sentenced to at least 18 months in prison after pleading guilty to sexually assaulting a 79-year-old patient who suffered from Alzheimer's disease. The attorney general's office said Thursday that Timothy Morrissey, of Manchester, pleaded guilty. Morrissey will be evaluated ...
-1 points by The Washington Times | Plea Royalties Death Geriatrics Silver Alert Medicine Physician Manchester
Teens respond to health warnings on sugary drinks
HealthDay News Health warning labels can steer teens away from sugary drinks, a new study suggests.
4 points by UPI | United Press International William Randolph Hearst International News Service News World Communications Nutrition Drink Medicine Coffee
New law allows child patients to use marijuana oil at school
REHOBOTH BEACH, Del. (AP) - Children with medical conditions that can be alleviated with marijuana oil no longer have to choose between going to school and taking their medicine. A bill being signed into law Wednesday by Gov. Jack Markell allows designated caregivers to possess and administer, and qualifying children ...
1 points by The Washington Times | United States Congress Medicine Delaware Veto Bill Rehoboth Beach Delaware School bus Lewes Delaware
Colorado marijuana businesses optimistic about Ohio medical marijuana law (video)
Marijuana companies from Colorado and other states have been following Ohio's medical marijuana law. Carrie Roberts from Medicine Man Technologies explains why the consulting company is interested in Ohio's medical marijuana market. Watch video DENVER, Colorado -- When Ohio lawmakers voted to legalize medical marijuana earlier this year, the rest of the country was watching.  Ohio has twice the population of Colorado, considered the pioneer for state-regulated medical and recreational marijuana programs. And Ohio's list of acceptable medical conditions includes chronic pain, which usually means a larger patient pool and thus larger market for marijuana businesses.  Ohio's market could produce between $200 and $400 million in annual sales, according to an analysis by trade publication Marijuana Business Daily.  But the details of Ohio's program have yet to be worked out. Three regulatory agencies could take up to two years to complete them. Ohio legalized medical marijuana: Here's what you need to know Still, marijuana businesses and industry leaders are optimistic about Ohio's law.  Medicine Man was among the first medical marijuana companies in Colorado, and it plans to help Ohio businesses get off the ground. Carrie Roberts, a licensing consultant with the company's consulting arm, Medicine Man Technologies, said the law's medical conditions and allowed forms should encourage a healthy market.  "The rules we've seen so far are very robust and it looks like Ohio could be a very good marketplace both for patients and business operators," Roberts said.  Shawn Coleman, a lobbyist for marijuana company Terrapin Care Station, said Ohio was more progressive than other states in some areas.  Ohio's law bars people from getting a marijuana business license if they've been convicted of a felony or certain other crimes within the past five years, compared to 10 years in Colorado, Coleman said. Ohio's law also mandates 15 percent of marijuana business licenses must go to minority business owners. It's a first, and its constitutionality could be challenged in court.  Coleman said state lawmakers should look to Colorado's legislature for an example of how to work on the issue in a bipartisan way. He said Ohio regulators should keep patients in mind when crafting rules and avoid burdensome restrictions. "We can't legislate to the people who shouldn't have it," Coleman said. "We should legislate to the people who actually need it."
56 points by The Plain Dealer | Law Medicine License Cannabis Victimless crime Tetrahydrocannabinol Business Legalization
University Hospitals changes name at main campus to UH Cleveland Medical Center
University Hospitals has changed the name of its flagship campus from UH Case Medical Center to UH Cleveland Medical Center. CLEVELAND, Ohio - University Hospitals has changed the name of its flagship campus from UH Case Medical Center to UH Cleveland Medical Center. "The new name celebrates UH's 150-year heritage in Cleveland and reflects that UH's academic medical center, like Cleveland itself, is the heart of a thriving region," Case Western Reserve University said in a statement. The new name also aligns with how UH names medical centers by location across the UH health system. The name change was announced as CWRU's School of Medicine renewed its affiliation agreement with UH. CWRU also has affiliations with Cleveland Clinic Foundation, the MetroHealth System and the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center.   CWRU and UH's agreement expands both institutions' opportunities to advance education, research, and clinical care, CWRU said. UH doctors with faculty appointments retain those appointments at the medical school. Medical students will continue their clinical rotations at UH, where physicians on the CWRU faculty provide instruction and guidance. UH and the School of Medicine will continue to collaborate in research, with National Institutes of Health and most other federal funding administered by the School of Medicine.
770 points by The Plain Dealer | Case Western Reserve University University Circle Cleveland Clinic Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine Medicine Physician Cleveland Institute of Music
Drinkers don’t sweat death — or medical debt — if they exercise
Gym rats can drink to their health - and a fatter bank account.
63 points by Daily News | Medicine Weight loss Health care Physical exercise Health Exercise Sports training Obesity
Report: Exercise could save you $2500 a year
For those pushing exercise to the side, there may be a good reason to rethink giving the gym another chance.         
29943 points by Arizona Republic | Medicine Cardiovascular disease Exercise Physical exercise Obesity Muscle Exercise physiology Heart
Montel Williams launching new medical marijuana line
TV personality Montel Williams is kicking a new weed-based business venture into high gear.
5261 points by Daily News | Multiple sclerosis Medical cannabis Neuropathic pain Cannabis Pain Medicine Tetrahydrocannabinol Cannabis sativa
Las Vegas judge hears over 300 petitions a week for mental health commitments in Clark County
According to Nevada Revised Statute 433A, there are three ways to be admitted to a mental health facility or hospital in Clark County. Potential patients can seek help voluntarily, or a petition to commit an individual — a Legal 2000 — can be made in an emergency situation by a physician, psychologist, social worker, registered nurse or by any officer authorized to make arrests in Nevada.
7 points by Las Vegas Review-Journal | Psychiatry Mental disorder Psychiatric hospital Mental health Medicine Involuntary commitment Psychology Police
Report: Exercising regularly could save you up $2500 a year
For those pushing exercise to the side, there may be a good reason to rethink giving the gym another chance.       
29943 points by USA Today | Medicine Cardiovascular disease Exercise Physical exercise Obesity Muscle Exercise physiology Heart
Child neglect claimed in teen's plan to end her own life
Child protection authorities were first asked to investigate an Appleton teenager’s decision to die more than a month ago, according to referrals obtained by USA TODAY NETWORK-Wisconsin.         
-1 points by Arizona Republic | Spinal muscular atrophy Health care Hospice Palliative care Muscle Disability Medicine Cicely Saunders
Not all hospital readmissions are bad, study finds
In an effort to push hospitals around the nation to improve care of patients and cut costs, federal regulators began in 2012 to impose financial penalties on facilities that had more readmissions than should be expected. New research from Johns Hopkins now suggests that not all of the readmissions...
-1 points by Baltimore Sun | Medicine Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Physician Johns Hopkins University Hospital Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Medicare Asthma
Baltimore has some of the country's worst health outcomes, disparities
Whether you're looking at chronic conditions, sexually transmitted diseases or other maladies, Baltimore has some of the worse health outcomes in the state and the nation.City data shows 19 percent of Baltimore residents have asthma, while statewide it's 14 percent; 30 percent of children are obese,...
-1 points by Baltimore Sun | Sexually transmitted disease Medicine Epidemiology African American City Metropolitan area Human sexual behavior Urban area
Maryland has second best health care system in the country, analysis finds
Maryland has the second best health care system in the country, according to an analysis of 29 metrics by personal finance website WalletHub. The report compared factors such as health care costs, access to health care and outcomes among Washington, DC and the 50 states. Here were some of Maryland's...
-1 points by Baltimore Sun | U.S. state Massachusetts Health care Medicine United States Health economics Washington Maryland
Dr. Laurine Tibaldi of Health Plan of Nevada offers tips to stay healthy while on vacation
Dr. Laurine Tibaldi, chief medical officer of Health Plan of Nevada, has advice for staying healthy on vacation whatever time of year. Her information is valuable as travelers begin to worry about the Zika virus spreading globally, including in Nevada and the United States.
9 points by Las Vegas Review-Journal | Health care Medicine Health insurance Medicare Illness Health economics Medicare and Medicaid Health care provider
5 questions to find a real weight-loss answer
If diets aren’t keeping the weight off, another one may not solve the problem.        
13 points by Detroit Free Press | Obesity Medicine Weight loss Dieting Nutrition Appetite Physical exercise Bariatric surgery
Teen's plan to die has disability groups seeking intervention
Several groups have asked for child-protection authorities to investigate the case.       
6496 points by USA Today | Disability Health care Medicine Spinal muscular atrophy Health care provider Muscle Self-advocacy Illness
Trump, reversing position, says he will release full medical record
“I’d love to give full reports,” Trump said.
110 points by The Washington Post | Medicine Medical history Hillary Rodham Clinton Physician Donald Trump Bill Clinton Family history Democratic Party
World’s first face transplant recipient dead at 49

-1 points by Atlanta Journal Constitution | Death Face Face transplant Faces Medicine Dog Lip Surgery
Child neglect claimed in teen planning to end life
Child protection authorities were first asked to investigate an Appleton teenager’s decision to die more than a month ago, according to referrals obtained by USA TODAY NETWORK-Wisconsin.         
198 points by Arizona Republic | Spinal muscular atrophy Health care Hospice Palliative care Muscle Disability Medicine Cicely Saunders
Phys Ed: What’s the Value of Exercise? $2,500
An analysis of more than 26,000 men and women found that a little exercise can result in big savings on medical bills.
9644 points by The New York Times | Health care Medicine Health economics Physical exercise Obesity Public health Exercise Epidemiology
Mount Sinai patient tests positive for Legionnaires’ disease
The legionnaires' bacteria that plagued the city last summer has returned again — this time in Mount Sinai Beth Israel.
124 points by Daily News | Patient Legionella Manhattan New York City The Bronx Water Infection Medicine
Disabled rights groups seek to stop teen's planned death
APPLETON, Wis. (AP) — Disability rights organizations have asked child protection officials to prevent a Wisconsin teenager from going without her ventilator and ending her life.
-1 points by Arizona Daily Star | Medical terms Spinal muscular atrophy Medicine Pain Cosmetics Cosmetology Muscle Muscle atrophy
Q&A: What you should know about right to die
Recently, questions surrounding a Wisconsin teenager's decision to die prompted child protection authorities to investigate the decision. Je...       
34 points by USA Today | Euthanasia Medicine Suicide Assisted suicide Death Palliative care Hospice Therapy
The attacks on Hillary Clinton's health are nasty. They're also failing.
In a new poll, voters didn't see Trump as any healthier.
2192 points by The Washington Post | Health Medicine Hillary Rodham Clinton Health care Nutrition
Newly merged Cleveland Clinic Akron General names president
Dr. Brian Harte will start in the new position September 26th. Dr. Brian HarteCourtesy of Cleveland Clinic  CLEVELAND, Ohio -- The Cleveland Clinic has named Dr. Brian Harte as president of the newly formed Cleveland Clinic Akron General, the hospital system announced Wednesday. Harte, who most recently served as president of the Clinic's Hillcrest Hospital, is a hospitalist, a doctor who focuses on the care of hospitalized patients. He will replace Acting President Janice Murphy, who will return to her role as chief operating officer for the Clinic's Regional Operations. Harte was chosen after "a thorough review by the search committee, with unanimous endorsement by the Executive Committee of the Akron General Board of Trustees," according to the hospital system. He begins in the new position on September 26th. The Clinic-Akron General merger, one of the state's largest in recent memory, took more than a year to finalize. It includes the entire Akron General Health System, including the flagship Akron General Medical Center, Lodi Community Hospital, the Edwin Shaw Rehabilitation Institute, three health & wellness centers, the Justin T. Rogers Hospice Care Center and Visiting Nurse Service and Affiliates. Dr. J. Stephen Jones, president of the Clinic's Regional Hospitals and Family Health Centers, said in a news release that Harte is uniquely qualified for the job.  "The integration of Cleveland Clinic and Akron General is succeeding at a rapid pace," Jones said in the release. "I'm confident with Brian's experience and proven successful leadership we will continue to drive positive change and to actualize true regionalization and grow our services for the benefit of the Akron community." Harte, who joined the Clinic in 2004, is the former chairman of the Department of Hospital Medicine and the Medicine Institute there. He has an undergraduate degree from Yale University and a medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania. He completed his residency in internal medicine at the University of California, San Francisco and was in private practice for five years prior to joining the Clinic. He is an associate professor of medicine in the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University. He also currently serves as president of the Society of Hospital Medicine.
19 points by The Plain Dealer | Medicine Hospital Physician Cleveland Clinic Hillcrest Hospital Cleveland Akron Ohio Hospice
Most Mich. House GOP disappointed by pulled health bill
“We had an opportunity. Many of us are disappointed,” said Rep. Tim Walberg, R-Tipton, after the health bill was pulled        
-1 points by The Detroit News | Health care Health insurance Health economics Barack Obama Medicaid Medicine Massachusetts Healthcare reform
Former physician assistant faces federal charges in opioid kickback scheme
A former physician assistant was paid more than $41,000 by a drug manufacturer in exchange for writing hundreds of prescriptions for a powerful fentanyl spray in New Hampshire, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.Christopher Clough, 43, of Dover was arrested Friday and charged with conspirac...
-1 points by Concord Monitor | Medical prescription Medicine Federal Bureau of Investigation Federal government of the United States Patient Health care Health care provider United States Department of Justice
State suspends license of Lansdowne assisted-living home
State regulators have suspended the license of a Lansdowne assisted-living home where inspectors earlier this month determined 16 residents were living in a facility with permission to operate just four beds. The "emergency suspension" came March 10, a day after authorities received a complaint...
-1 points by Baltimore Sun | Hand sanitizer Hygiene Medicine Health care Baltimore County Maryland Baltimore The Residents Reno 911!: Miami