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What you need to know before buying a jet black iPhone 7
The jet black iPhone 7 is sleek, but it's got one big caveat.       
30 points by USA Today | IPhone IPod Touch Mobile phone Apple Inc. App Store Motorola MobileMe IPhone OS
Exploding Galaxy Note faces airline bans
The FAA 'strongly advises' travelers to keep their Galaxy Note 7s off, while Australian airlines ban them.         
4125 points by Arizona Republic | IPhone Mobile phone Qantas Airline IPod Touch Federal Aviation Administration Lithium-ion polymer battery Lithium
This is my Bumble dating horror story. Enjoy.
We met on Bumble, another swipe-right app that creates a “hive” of connections. The woman makes the first move within 24 hours, otherwise the match disappears forever.  I’d developed what I believed to be a highly discerning online dating strategy. I seldom swipe right and rarely match, but when...
355 points by Los Angeles Times | San Fernando Valley Los Angeles Text messaging I Decided Mobile phone Los Angeles International Airport
Exclusive: Ex-Maldives vice president's phone gallery
The phone's contents display the abuse of power that led to Ahmed Adeeb becoming the country's youngest vice president.
2268 points by Al Jazeera English | Mobile phone Text messaging Corruption Political corruption Bribery Vice President of the United States Philippines SMS
Jeep erupts in flames after charging cellphone apparently explodes

4 points by Atlanta Journal Constitution | Mobile phone 2000s music groups Battery United States Jeep Telephone Totaled Galvanic cell
Hundreds of Verizon customers are battling data over-limit fees: Money Matters
In the last week, I've heard from about 400 Verizon customers, mostly in Ohio but some from other states too. Most have iPhones. Some have Droids. All have seen their data use through Verizon jump significantly -- doubling or tripling since the spring in many cases, even though their cell phone habits haven't changed. Data costs money. It's been an interesting week. Last weekend, I wrote about a sudden surge in my family's cell phone data through Verizon. In my unscientific survey that lasted one week, every friend and acquaintance I asked said they were having the same problem: Their monthly data use had been soaring in recent months for no apparent reason. In some cases, using more data meant hefty over-limit fees. Well, well, well. Since my column ran a week ago, I've heard from about 400 Verizon customers, mostly in Ohio but some from other states too. Most have iPhones. Some have Droids. All have seen their data use through Verizon jump significantly -- doubling or tripling since the spring in many cases, even though their cell phone habits haven't changed. Data costs money. If you're getting hit by data over-limit charges, you might take comfort knowing you're not alone, no matter what Verizon tells you. And you may be encouraged by a couple of things: I've gotten a few answers this week. And I'm not done yet.   To check your phone's Wi-Fi settings: On an iPhone, go to Settings, then Cellular. Go all the way to the bottom. Make sure the Wi-Fi Assist toggle is off (not green). On a Droid, the button is called Avoid Bad Wi-Fi or Smart Network Switch or something similar, depending on the phone. Go to Settings, then Wi-Fi, then Menu, then Advanced. You should see some sort of Wi-Fi connection option that you can turn off. Like me, many Verizon customers' data use is soaring even when they're on their home Wi-Fi the majority of the time. Even when their phone settings are changed to prevent the phone from switching to data if the Wi-Fi is weak. Verizon is logging data on people's accounts when they are sleeping and not using their phones.  Or being used when their phones are off. Or when the phone's owner has died. A typical person who uses his phone a lot while not on Wi-Fi for things like email, GPS, or checking Facebook might use 2 GB a month. If you watch a lot of videos, or stream, or download things while not on Wi-Fi, you'll use a lot more. One unhappy Verizon customer is Barb McCullough of Parma Heights. She has an old flip phone that can't use data. Data is blocked on the line. But Verizon says her phone is using data. Granted, the amounts are minuscule -- 1.02 MB a month (not GB, but MB). But this ridiculous "data usage," which seems impossible, makes her skeptical of her entire bill from Verizon. McCullough noticed this data use on her flip phone after digging into her bill. The bigger problem is that she and her husband four months ago decided to cut their phone bill by $40 a month by downsizing from unlimited data to a 6 GB plan. Her husband had been using only about 4 GB, so 6 GB seemed like more than enough. But since changing plans in April, he keeps getting alerts every month that he's near his limit, even though he's almost always on their home Wi-Fi. And Verizon hasn't been able answer why McCullough's "dumb" phone with no data or internet capability is using data, she said. Then there's Ron Staso of Cleveland. His family's use has jumped from 30 GB a month to almost 60 GB, according to Verizon. Staso can't figure out why. He just knows Verizon says he racked up over-limit fees of $1,600. After two decades with Verizon, Staso changed to T-Mobile. "I have not had any problems since I switched to T-Mobile," he said. But he refuses to pay the $1,600. Julie Wilson's over-limit charges are less dramatic but she's just as ticked off. Her family's usage has more than doubled in the last four months, from 2.5 GB to about 6 GB, again with no change in cellular habits. When the New York resident complained to Verizon about her $15 over-limit fee, they suggested she change plans. But that would cost her $40 more a month, above the $104 she's paying right now.  She refuses to change from her grandfathered, lower-priced plan.   To file a complaint about Verizon with the FCC Online: https://consumercomplaints.fcc.gov/hc/en-us By phone: 1-888-225-5322. (888-CALL-FCC) When Theresa Cancila of Baltimore called Verizon recently to complain about her family's head-scratching increase in data, she got talked into increasing her plan to save money. Verizon assured her she could get 8 GB a month for the same cost as her current 6 GB. But instead of her bill remaining the same, she got charged a $15 over-limit fee for going over 6 GB, plus $10 more for the new plan that was supposed to be the same cost. She's furious and thinks Verizon is squeezing customers.  "They keep changing the data plans so you keep getting sucked into higher plans," she said. "It's funny because I have been asking people, 'Have you noticed you are blowing through a lot of data lately?' And every time I am getting, 'Yes!' " Perhaps few cases are more stunning than Joyce Shinn's. Her son Stephen is almost always on Wi-Fi, but a few months ago, he started exceeding his 18 GB per month plan. That's more than a lot of families use combined. But her son ran over, racking up $75 in over-limit fees last month. He swears he hasn't changed his cell phone habits. "I talked to Verizon and they gave me some bull about his turning off some setting or another," said Shinn, of Highland Heights. "My son, like most young adults, is pretty phone savvy so I was sure he knew what to do." The troubling part of Shinn's data usage woes is this: Her husband died 18 months ago. "I kept his phone active until recently so I could deal with any business or other calls that might come in that needed to be addressed. " His phone suddenly started using small amounts of data. Shinn insists her late husband's phone isn't used for anything other than looking at phone numbers of missed calls or dealing with incoming calls. How, she asks, is her late husband's phone using data? Overall, she's upset about the over-limit fees -- $75 on her son's account and $30 on hers. But more than that, she's upset that she's being deceived. "We are definitely being ripped off," Shinn said. Karen Savena of Broadview Heights feels the same. Her oldest son has a 6 GB per month plan, and usage has been inexplicably soaring since spring. When he reaches his data limit each month, he immediately shuts off his data. Yet every month for the last four month, his data exceeded his limit. The totals: 6.00900; GB 6.00200; GB 6.01100 GB; and 6.00400 GB. How did he exceed 6 GB? Verizon notified him when he reached his limit. It's the notification that Verizon sent that pushed him over. Yes, the alert is what caused the $10 over-limit fee. If that doesn't make you irate, chew on a few things I learned this month when I talked with Stephen Van Dinter, a manager for Verizon's Great Lakes region. Verizon insists that many customers' problems hinge on the infamous "Wi-Fi Assist" button, Van Dinter said. With iPhones, this is automatically "on" under iOS9, which was introduced a year ago. This allows the phone to switch to costly data if the phone decides the internet connection is poor. What's the definition of "poor"? Dunno. Right now, that's a secret. But it racks up data. With Droids, the default on this Wi-Fi function is off. However, even customers with Droids are seeing surges in data.  Verizon says that when my phone records, and those of hundreds of other people, show data usage in the middle of the night, that's not really accurate. If the records show you used data at 1:47 a.m., for example, when you were fast asleep, that may not be accurate. Verizon reports data in six-hour windows, Van Dinter said. So data usage at 1:47 a.m. may not really have been at 1:47 a.m., he said. "It could be at any hour in that six-hour time frame."  I believe Verizon realizes it has a problem with over-limit charges. That must be the reason the company just this week rolled out its "safety mode" feature for all new plans at no extra charge. It works like this: When you reach your data limit, whatever level you're paying for, Verizon will allow you to continue using data -- but at a much slower speed of 128 kbps for the rest of the billing cycle. So you'll go over your limit, but you won't pay extra, Van Dinter said. Until this past week, "safety mode" cost $5 a month unless you had a new plan of 16 GB or more. So if you were a normal family with 2 or 4 or 8 GB, which is enough for most households, you had to pay extra for "safety mode." Until now. So back to my account. My family's use has basically doubled from 8 GB to 16 GB a month. The Verizon manager, Van Dinter, said that a supervisor in customer service could dig into the specifics of my account and answer a lot of the questions about my usage. That should help me answer other people's questions and we can all get to the bottom of this mystery that is dipping into our wallets. I'm still waiting for that follow-up call. I have a long list of questions for Verizon, and a few for Apple. Here they are: Why are people's phones using data at times when they're on their home Wi-Fi and the Wi-Fi Assist button is off? If there's any truth to that six-hour window thing, consider this: I walked my dog at 8 a.m. Tuesday. I walked him again at 8:30 a.m. Wednesday. In between that time, I didn't leave my house except to take out the trash and to check the mailbox. (It was too darn hot!) I didn't leave my property for about 24 hours. I was on my home's very strong Wi-Fi. My Wi-Fi Assist button is off. Why did my phone ping cellular data 11 times during this period? Why are people's phones using data in the middle of the night when the phones aren't being used and are turned off or on do-not-disturb?  Why do people still go over their data even if they totally turn off their data as soon as they're notified that they're at their limit? How can phones with the data function blocked use data? Do new (replacement) phones use data differently? Like if you get a new 6s to replace your old 6s? If Safety Mode is such a great customer service, why was it just offered as a free option this week for all customers with new plans? If Safety Mode is such as great customer service, why isn't it available for all customers?  If Verizon has known for a year that the Wi-Fi Assist button was causing many customers to use data without their knowledge, why not send a push text to all customers or include an alert with people's bills?  If the Wi-Fi Assist or Avoid Bad Wi-Fi features have been a problem for a year, why did customers start encountering data surges only four or five months ago? And the data use has continued to increase every month for many customers without explanation. When customers call Verizon to complain about data usage, why is the default response from customer service to recommend that they switch their plans and increase their data usage? Why aren't all customers encouraged to look at their Wi-Fi Assist or Avoid Bad Wi-Fi buttons, or their Background App Refresh button, or their Location Services, or other things that could drive up data use? Instead, the customary response given to customers is often: Buy more data. If the times of the data pings aren't necessarily accurate and are really only within a six-hour window, how is it that the phone call time stamps are accurate to the minute?   For people who have their Wi-Fi Assist/ Avoid Bad Wi-Fi buttons turned on, what's the definition of "poor" Wi-Fi? Who makes that determination? Apple or another phone manufacturer? Verizon?  I'd rather be the one to make that decision rather than allow my phone to decide what Wi-Fi strength is acceptable. Some people say that Verizon has told them that their phones sleep when they're not used for long periods. Supposedly, during this time, the phones revert to the LTE data network instead of Wi-Fi. Is this true?   Some people say that Verizon has told them their phones are pinged in the middle of the night to make sure they're working. Is this true? Will customers who were harangued into increasing their data usage be able to switch back to their old plan at the same price? I expect to get answers from Verizon, Apple, regulators and others. Stay tuned.
211720 points by The Plain Dealer | Data Cuyahoga County Ohio Laptop AT&T Telephone Mobile phone Bill Nintendo DS
Want the next iPhone? Here's how to sell your old one
There are several ways to earn extra cash to snag the latest Apple device.         
4212 points by Arizona Republic | IPhone Apple Inc. App Store Steve Jobs Universal Mobile Telecommunications System Mobile phone IPod Touch SIM lock
Apple iPhone 7 event: What time is it; live stream; what’s new; how much for the phone?

-1 points by Atlanta Journal Constitution | IPhone The Bill English-language films Mobile phone IPod Touch Star Trek: The Next Generation San Francisco Motorola
21 killed as bus plunges off bridge in India
Police said the driver lost control of the vehicle while talking on his cellphone       
-1 points by The Detroit News | Bihar Road Angul Delhi Associated Press Mobile phone Orissa Copyright
Samsung's exploding Galaxy Note faces airline bans
The FAA 'strongly advises' travelers to keep their Galaxy Note 7s off, while Australian airlines ban them.         
4125 points by Arizona Republic | IPhone Mobile phone Qantas Airline IPod Touch Federal Aviation Administration Lithium-ion polymer battery Lithium
‘I could talk to foreign leaders bypassing State Dept’: Powell to Clinton on private email use
Colin Powell advised Hillary Clinton, his successor as US Secretary of State, to use a private email “without going through State Department servers” and avoid basic security rules he described as “nonsense,” their seven-year-old exchange reveals. Read Full Article at RT.com
380 points by Russia Today | E-mail Mobile phone Personal digital assistant George W. Bush President of the United States Hillary Rodham Clinton Personal computer BlackBerry
Here's what Apple's new iPhone is missing
Diehard Apple are wondering what will be missing from the latest iPhone model.         
-1 points by Arizona Republic | Fiscal year IPhone Mobile phone IPod Touch Generally Accepted Accounting Principles Share Revenue Stock
Don’t text & fly: FAA warns against using new ‘exploding’ Samsung phones on board
New reports of battery explosions have led to several airlines banning Samsung’s flagship smartphone, Galaxy Note 7, which is already on recall. Meanwhile, the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has advised not to use or stow the phone on planes at all. Read Full Article at RT.com
557 points by Russia Today | Mobile phone Battery Explosion Laptop Lithium battery Capacitor Halifax Explosion Lithium
Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 faces airline bans
The FAA 'strongly advises' travelers to keep their Galaxy Note 7s off, while Australian airlines ban them.         
4125 points by Arizona Republic | IPhone Mobile phone Qantas Airline IPod Touch Federal Aviation Administration Lithium-ion polymer battery Lithium
Talented US teen backed by two of tennis’ biggest names
Billie Jean King and Rosie Casals have teamed up again — to try to develop a 16-year-old prodigy from Arizona, Taylor Johnson, who is competing this week at the U.S. Open Junior singles and doubles events. The King-Casals tandem won seven Grand Slam doubles titles. Now they are heavily involved with trying to develop Johnson’s...
-1 points by New York Post | Tennis Billie Jean King Grand Slam US Open Mobile phone Margaret Court Virginia Wade Maria Bueno
How iPhone 7 stacks up vs. the competition
How does Apple's new baby stack up against the rest of the field?         
369 points by Arizona Republic | IPhone Mobile phone Camera Photographic lens ARM architecture Photography Angle of view Telephoto lens
FAA warns airline passengers not to use new Samsung smartphone on plane
Aviation safety officials took the extraordinary step of warning airline passengers not to turn on or charge a new-model Samsung smartphone during flights following numerous reports of the devices catching fire. The Federal Aviation Administration issued the warning Thursday night, citing "recent...
-1 points by Chicago Tribune | Federal Aviation Administration Aircraft Air safety Mobile phone Air traffic control Airline National Transportation Safety Board The Extraordinary
FAA warns airline passengers not to use Samsung smartphones
Aviation safety officials took the extraordinary step of warning airline passengers not to turn on or charge a new-model Samsung smartphone during flights following numerous reports of the devices catching fire. The Federal Aviation Administration issued the warning Thursday night, citing "recent...
709 points by Los Angeles Times | Federal Aviation Administration Aircraft Air safety Mobile phone Air traffic control Airline Telephone The Extraordinary
How iPhone 7 stacks up against the competition
How does Apple's new baby stack up against the rest of the field?         
-1 points by Arizona Republic | IPhone Mobile phone Camera Photographic lens ARM architecture Photography Angle of view Telephoto lens
FAA warns airline passengers not to use Samsung smartphone
Aviation safety officials took the extraordinary step of warning airline passengers not to turn on or charge a new-model Samsung smartphone during flights following numerous reports of the devices catching fire. WASHINGTON -- Aviation safety officials took the extraordinary step of warning airline passengers not to turn on or charge a new-model Samsung smartphone during flights following numerous reports of the devices catching fire. The Federal Aviation Administration issued the warning Thursday night, citing "recent incidents and concerns raised by Samsung about its Galaxy Note 7 devices." It is extremely unusual for the FAA to warn passengers about a specific product. Passengers were also urged not to put the phones in checked bags. Samsung recently stopped selling the phones and recalled more than 2 million of them after reports that the phones have spontaneously caught fire. In one case, a family in St. Petersburg, Florida, reported a Galaxy 7 phone left charging in their Jeep caught fire, destroying the vehicle.
17 points by The Plain Dealer | Federal Aviation Administration Geoff Tate Sound Telephone Report Federal Mobile phone September 11 attacks
How the iPhone 7 stacks up against the field
How does Apple's new baby stack up against the rest of the field?         
-1 points by Arizona Republic | IPhone Mobile phone Camera Photographic lens ARM architecture Photography Angle of view Telephoto lens
How the iPhone 7 stacks up vs. the competition
How does Apple's new baby stack up against the rest of the field?         
-1 points by Arizona Republic | IPhone Mobile phone Camera Photographic lens ARM architecture Photography Angle of view Telephoto lens
How the iPhone 7 stacks up against the competition
How does Apple's new baby stack up against the rest of the field?       
369 points by USA Today | IPhone Mobile phone Camera Photographic lens ARM architecture Photography Angle of view Telephoto lens
No, Apple's new AirPods won't give you cancer, experts say
Consumer technology analysts have been calling Apple’s decision to leave the earphone jack off its new iPhone 7 a risky business move. But some potential users of the iPhone 7 wonder whether Apple is asking them to take on some added risk as well. Unless iPhone 7 users adopt a workaround that would...
472 points by Los Angeles Times | Mobile phone Bluetooth Radio IPhone Cordless telephone Microwave Cellular network X-ray
Babul Aktar's father 'does not know' his whereabouts
The father of Babul Aktar does not know the whereabouts of the police officer just relieved of his duties.
170 points by | Mobile phone Government Murder Deputy Commissioner Accept Television series by NBC Universal Television Assistant Commissioner
Pokemon Go Wearable to Go on Sale September 16
Pokemon Go is about take a step beyond the phone: Nintendo will start selling a wearable device called Pokemon Go Plus  next week. The device will become available on September 16 for a retail price of $35. Pokemon Go Plus will work a little bit like an activity tracker, connecting to a phone via Bluetooth, and is looking to make... Read more »
45 points by Variety | Mobile phone Game Walking Pokémon Player Telephone A Little Bit Wearable computer
How to get an iPhone 7
Apple has introduced its latest iPhone 7 that features a souped-up camera and a new headphone jack. Looking to upgrade? Here are a few options. ___ LEASING THROUGH APPLE Last year, Apple started a leasing plan for iPhones that starts at $32.41 a month. Through that plan, subscribers pay a ...
6 points by The Washington Times | IPhone Mobile phone
Apple will keep first-weekend sales for iPhone 7 secret
Apple will not release first-weekend sales of the newly announced iPhone 7, the company said on Thursday, reducing analysts’ early visibility into the product amid questions over whether its popularity has peaked. The company decided to stop the practice because the number of phones sold during the period has become more a reflection of Apple’s...
1 points by New York Post | IPhone Steve Jobs App Store IPod Apple Inc. Mobile phone IPad IPod Touch
After dead woman found stuffed in suitcase, videos and witnesses offer new clues
When a woman’s body was found in a suitcase in downtown San Diego on April 6, Joshua Palmer told co-workers he was worried it might be his friend, Shauna Haynes, witnesses testified Wednesday. Some of those colleagues and friends testified in court that Palmer told them Haynes, 21, left his place...
2 points by Los Angeles Times | Mobile phone Text messaging Sexual intercourse Woman 2007 singles Testimony San Diego Witness
The iPhone 7 launch: what you need to know
This is how much the next iPhone will cost, and when you can buy one.        
-1 points by Detroit Free Press | Apple Inc. IPhone IPhone OS Steve Jobs Mobile phone IPod Touch App Store Headphones
Apple unveils iPhone 7 but some still waiting for iPhone 8
Apple Inc unveiled an iPhone 7 with high-resolution cameras and no headphone jack at its annual launch event Wednesday, though the biggest surprise was the debut of a three-decade-old Nintendo game franchise, Super Mario Bros, on the smartphone.
1 points by | TRS connector Headphones IPhone Camera Moving iron speaker Digital audio player Chief executive officer Mobile phone
Tk 45 billion financing for Teletalk to expand network, Minister Tarana says
State-owned mobile-phone operator Teletalk plans to reach the rural population by the next two years.
342 points by | Mobile phone Service Customer service Service system Project management Dhaka The Network Rural area
New iPhone may exclude headphone jack
When Apple shows off its latest iPhone today, it will answer a question it hasn’t had to address in years: “What’s it putting in the box?” (Besides the iPhone itself, that is.)The iPhone has traditionally shipped with a pair of Apple’s iconic earbuds, made famous in early advertising for the iPod m...
-1 points by Concord Monitor | IPhone Apple Inc. Smartphone Mobile phone Headphones IPod Touch Bluetooth App Store
Baltimore County to receive $4M grant for 911 upgrades
Baltimore County will receive $4 million from the state to upgrade its 911 equipment, part of a national effort to allow operators to receive texts, photos and videos and to provide better locational data that can improve emergency responses by ensuring that callers are directed to the right dispatchers....
-1 points by Baltimore Sun | Mobile phone Baltimore County Maryland Baltimore County 9-1-1 Text messaging Maryland Towson Maryland
Can Apple make listening easy without headphone jack?
Tech analysts and industry bloggers say it looks like Apple will remove the analog headphone jack in the next iPhone        
-1 points by The Detroit News | IPhone Bluetooth Apple Inc. Headphones Smartphone Mobile phone Hard disk drive TRS connector
What to expect (and what we want) from iPhone 7
Apple expected to reveal its next smartphone on Wednesday.         
6119 points by Arizona Republic | IPhone IPod Touch Headphones Mobile phone TRS connector App Store Better Smartphone
Bronx terrorism suspect can only see evidence for an hour a week
Sajmir Alimehmeti — who used ISIS videos to "get motivated" during workouts — has a liking for beheading videos.
6 points by Daily News | Lawyer Judge Mobile phone Terrorism Prison Laptop Prosecutor Capital punishment
High Court stays BTRC notices advising subscribers to switch from Citycell
The telecoms regulator's notices advising subscribers to switch from Citycell to other operators have been stayed.
186 points by | Mobile phone Mobile network operator Mizanur Rahman Chowdhury Administrative law Lawyer Telecommunication Government Court
Flash before your eyes: Hacking technology for law enforcement revealed
Hacking software can be used to spy on anything that connects to the internet. A secret video of one spyware company’s software exposes how they trick users into downloading their program, allowing the other party to track their every move. Read Full Article at RT.com
309 points by Russia Today | Mobile phone Adobe Flash Law enforcement agency Malware Apple Inc. Potential IPhone Drop-down list
iPhone 7: Is Bluetooth harmful to your health?
Apple's new iPhone 7 will ditch the ubiquitous headphone jack, senior vice president of marketing Phil Schiller announced Wednesday at the company's keynote event in San Francisco.
5767 points by CNN | Bluetooth Mobile phone Cordless telephone Radio IPhone Cancer Cellular network Motorola
Apple is betting big on a wireless world
Apple wants to push consumers further into a wireless world. Its tactics: Eliminate the standard headphone jack in its newest iPhones and market new "AirPods" — tiny wireless earbuds that the company claims greatly improve on ...
-1 points by Las Vegas Sun | Apple Inc. IPhone Mobile phone Bluetooth Steve Jobs IPod Smartphone Graphical user interface
Tech Fix: Apple’s Latest: What You Really Need to Know
An examination suggests that no upgrade is necessary unless you have owned your current iPhone for more than two years.
391 points by The New York Times | Apple Inc. IPhone Steve Jobs Headphones IPod Touch App Store Mobile phone IPhone OS
The Latest: Will people lose Apple's tiny wireless earbuds?
SAN FRANCISCO — The Latest on Apple's San Francisco product event (all times local):1:45 p.m.This year's iPhone is seen as a more modest upgrade, as several analysts noted that it was increasingly difficult to make impressive changes in hardware.Among Apple's biggest changes are nixing the headphone jack and adding a "dual lens" camera to the higher-priced 7 Plus model.
-1 points by Boston Herald | Apple Inc. IPhone Mobile phone Mac OS X App Store ITunes Store Mario Super Mario Bros.
The Latest: Apple's product event was an inclusive one
SAN FRANCISCO — The Latest on Apple's San Francisco product event (all times local):12:05 p.m.Apple made sure to include women and underrepresented minorities on stage — something that many tech companies, including Apple, have been criticized for missing at past events.
-1 points by Boston Herald | Apple Inc. IPhone Mobile phone Mac OS X App Store ITunes Store Mario Super Mario Bros.
The Internet doesn't love Apple's new AirPods
Did you lose them yet?         
220 points by Arizona Republic | Apple Inc. Steve Jobs Twitter App Store TRS connector Mobile phone Marketing Criticism
Exclusive: The ISIS files revealed

34787 points by CNN | Terrorism Mobile phone Europe Telephone Counter-terrorism United Kingdom Attack Telephone exchange
Apple’s iPhone 7: better camera, no jack
The redesigned earbuds — with cord — will be included with the new iPhones        
-1 points by The Detroit News | IPhone Steve Jobs Apple Inc. Headphones App Store Mobile phone IPhone OS IPod Touch
Apple’s iPhone 7: better camera, no headphone jack
The redesigned earbuds — with cord — will be included with the new iPhones        
-1 points by The Detroit News | IPhone Steve Jobs Apple Inc. Headphones App Store Mobile phone IPhone OS IPod Touch
First look at iPhone 7: Features to please the Apple faithful
The new iPhone 7 amps up its camera and ditches the headphone jack.         
499 points by Arizona Republic | IPhone Mobile phone Apple Inc. Steve Jobs Better App Store IPhone OS MobileMe
First look at iPhone 7: Better camera, hit the road headphone jack
The new iPhone 7 is sure to please Apple's faithful. Except if you use old headphones.         
499 points by Arizona Republic | IPhone Mobile phone Apple Inc. Steve Jobs Better App Store MobileMe IPhone OS