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Lions sign OL Farris to practice squad, release RB Winn
Undrafted free agent from Ohio State played in three exhibition games with Detroit.        
-1 points by The Detroit News | Ohio Major League Baseball University of Michigan American football U.S. state Columbus Ohio National Hockey League Michigan
Michigan football loses Dayton commit
Antwuan Johnson has become the second 2018 Michigan commitment to decommit since late August.       
-1 points by The Detroit News | Recruitment Ohio Lake Erie Twitter
cleveland.com news quiz for Friday, 09/09/2016
The news quiz features 10 questions on current events from the past week. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Classes are in full swing at schools across Northeast Ohio. So it's a good chance to show some solidarity with students by taking a few moments to take the cleveland.com news quiz, featuring 10 questions on current events.  You're not being graded, but hopefully you have been paying attention to the news during the past week. The quiz is below. Mobile users can take it here. Good luck.  // var _polldaddy = [] || _polldaddy; _polldaddy.push( { type: "iframe", auto: "1", domain: "advanceinternet.polldaddy.com/s/", id: "cleveland-com-news-quiz-for-friday-sept-9-2016", placeholder: "pd_1473402753" } ); (function(d,c,j){if(!document.getElementById(j)){var pd=d.createElement(c),s;pd.id=j;pd.src=('https:'==document.location.protocol)?'https://polldaddy.com/survey.js':'http://i0.poll.fm/survey.js';s=document.getElementsByTagName(c)[0];s.parentNode.insertBefore(pd,s);}}(document,'script','pd-embed')); // ]]>
1 points by The Plain Dealer | Akron Ohio Greater Cleveland Ohio Cleveland State University
SWAT team responds to man barricaded inside Parma home
The SWAT team is on the scene after a man barricaded himself inside a Parma home Friday morning, police said. PARMA, Ohio -- The SWAT team is on the scene after a man barricaded himself inside a Parma home Friday morning, police said. About 10:15 a.m., Parma police Lt. Kevin Riley confirmed the SWAT team was at a home in the area of Broadview Road and Panorama Drive. Police did not know if the man had a weapon or was holding hostages, Riley said. An emergency alert sent out by Cuyahoga County around the same time said a male was ejected from a vehicle during a crash in the 6500 block of Broadview Road. Rescuers could not get to the crash victim because of the man barricaded in the home, the alert said. Riley said he did not know if the crash was related to the standoff. This is a developing story. A cleveland.com reporter is en route to the scene. If you wish to discuss or comment on this story, please visit our crime and courts comments section. Like Chanda Neely on Facebook. Follow me on Twitter: Follow @ChandaNeely // !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+'://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js';fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document, 'script', 'twitter-wjs'); // ]]>
212 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Police Parma Ohio Broadview Heights Ohio North Royalton Ohio SWAT Ohio Brecksville Ohio
FBI searches NW Ohio sheriff's office but won't explain why
LIMA, Ohio (AP) - FBI agents have searched a northwest Ohio sheriff's office but aren't disclosing what they were looking at or why. FBI Special Agent Vicki Anderson says agents conducted an investigation in Allen County on Wednesday but she can't yet share details. She says no one was arrested. ...
-1 points by The Washington Times | Federal Bureau of Investigation Special agent United States Lima Ohio U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement
View photos submitted for Best High School Marching Band contest; send yours from tonight's game
Check out some of the photos that have been submitted by readers as part of a nomination for cleveland.com's Best High School Marching Band contest. CLEVELAND, Ohio - As nominations for cleveland.com's Best High School Marching Band contest continue to come in, so do the photos and videos. More than 100 parents, students, faculty, alumni and community members have shared a glimpse of their favorite marching band in Greater Cleveland. Dozens of area schools have been nominated for inclusion in the contest. Click through the gallery above to see some of the many photos we've received as part of nominations. And while you're out at a football game this week or next week, send your nomination along with a picture and/or video to [email protected] or use the comments section below. Nominations are being accepted until Monday, Sept. 19 at 5 p.m. Be sure to include a short description on what makes the band so great, memorable moments and why it should be chosen to be included in the contest. We welcome pictures and/or videos of the band in action to help us decide if the band should advance to the first round of online voting. Or send a link to the band's Twitter page or links to Tweets or other social media posts we should check out. The only limitation is the high school must be located within our seven-county coverage area, which consists of Cuyahoga, Summit, Medina, Lorain, Lake, Geauga and Portage counties. Best Band contest dates: Here is a rundown on how the Best High School Marching Band contest will work. Now-Sept. 19: Nominations accepted from schools, bands, students, parents, fans -- you name it. Sept. 22-28: The bands that have been selected for the first round of the contest will be announced and the opening round of online voting will be held to determine the eight finalists. Voting totals in this round will also determine the eight seeds for the remainder of the contest. Sept. 29-Oct. 5: Voting in the quarterfinals round. Oct. 6-12: Voting in the semifinals round. Oct. 13-20: Voting in the final round to determine the winner of Greater Cleveland's Best High School Marching Band contest.
20 points by The Plain Dealer | High school Cuyahoga County Ohio The Band Remainder Candidate Greater Cleveland Nomination Education
Hundreds of Verizon customers are battling data over-limit fees: Money Matters
In the last week, I've heard from about 400 Verizon customers, mostly in Ohio but some from other states too. Most have iPhones. Some have Droids. All have seen their data use through Verizon jump significantly -- doubling or tripling since the spring in many cases, even though their cell phone habits haven't changed. Data costs money. It's been an interesting week. Last weekend, I wrote about a sudden surge in my family's cell phone data through Verizon. In my unscientific survey that lasted one week, every friend and acquaintance I asked said they were having the same problem: Their monthly data use had been soaring in recent months for no apparent reason. In some cases, using more data meant hefty over-limit fees. Well, well, well. Since my column ran a week ago, I've heard from about 400 Verizon customers, mostly in Ohio but some from other states too. Most have iPhones. Some have Droids. All have seen their data use through Verizon jump significantly -- doubling or tripling since the spring in many cases, even though their cell phone habits haven't changed. Data costs money. If you're getting hit by data over-limit charges, you might take comfort knowing you're not alone, no matter what Verizon tells you. And you may be encouraged by a couple of things: I've gotten a few answers this week. And I'm not done yet.   To check your phone's Wi-Fi settings: On an iPhone, go to Settings, then Cellular. Go all the way to the bottom. Make sure the Wi-Fi Assist toggle is off (not green). On a Droid, the button is called Avoid Bad Wi-Fi or Smart Network Switch or something similar, depending on the phone. Go to Settings, then Wi-Fi, then Menu, then Advanced. You should see some sort of Wi-Fi connection option that you can turn off. Like me, many Verizon customers' data use is soaring even when they're on their home Wi-Fi the majority of the time. Even when their phone settings are changed to prevent the phone from switching to data if the Wi-Fi is weak. Verizon is logging data on people's accounts when they are sleeping and not using their phones.  Or being used when their phones are off. Or when the phone's owner has died. A typical person who uses his phone a lot while not on Wi-Fi for things like email, GPS, or checking Facebook might use 2 GB a month. If you watch a lot of videos, or stream, or download things while not on Wi-Fi, you'll use a lot more. One unhappy Verizon customer is Barb McCullough of Parma Heights. She has an old flip phone that can't use data. Data is blocked on the line. But Verizon says her phone is using data. Granted, the amounts are minuscule -- 1.02 MB a month (not GB, but MB). But this ridiculous "data usage," which seems impossible, makes her skeptical of her entire bill from Verizon. McCullough noticed this data use on her flip phone after digging into her bill. The bigger problem is that she and her husband four months ago decided to cut their phone bill by $40 a month by downsizing from unlimited data to a 6 GB plan. Her husband had been using only about 4 GB, so 6 GB seemed like more than enough. But since changing plans in April, he keeps getting alerts every month that he's near his limit, even though he's almost always on their home Wi-Fi. And Verizon hasn't been able answer why McCullough's "dumb" phone with no data or internet capability is using data, she said. Then there's Ron Staso of Cleveland. His family's use has jumped from 30 GB a month to almost 60 GB, according to Verizon. Staso can't figure out why. He just knows Verizon says he racked up over-limit fees of $1,600. After two decades with Verizon, Staso changed to T-Mobile. "I have not had any problems since I switched to T-Mobile," he said. But he refuses to pay the $1,600. Julie Wilson's over-limit charges are less dramatic but she's just as ticked off. Her family's usage has more than doubled in the last four months, from 2.5 GB to about 6 GB, again with no change in cellular habits. When the New York resident complained to Verizon about her $15 over-limit fee, they suggested she change plans. But that would cost her $40 more a month, above the $104 she's paying right now.  She refuses to change from her grandfathered, lower-priced plan.   To file a complaint about Verizon with the FCC Online: https://consumercomplaints.fcc.gov/hc/en-us By phone: 1-888-225-5322. (888-CALL-FCC) When Theresa Cancila of Baltimore called Verizon recently to complain about her family's head-scratching increase in data, she got talked into increasing her plan to save money. Verizon assured her she could get 8 GB a month for the same cost as her current 6 GB. But instead of her bill remaining the same, she got charged a $15 over-limit fee for going over 6 GB, plus $10 more for the new plan that was supposed to be the same cost. She's furious and thinks Verizon is squeezing customers.  "They keep changing the data plans so you keep getting sucked into higher plans," she said. "It's funny because I have been asking people, 'Have you noticed you are blowing through a lot of data lately?' And every time I am getting, 'Yes!' " Perhaps few cases are more stunning than Joyce Shinn's. Her son Stephen is almost always on Wi-Fi, but a few months ago, he started exceeding his 18 GB per month plan. That's more than a lot of families use combined. But her son ran over, racking up $75 in over-limit fees last month. He swears he hasn't changed his cell phone habits. "I talked to Verizon and they gave me some bull about his turning off some setting or another," said Shinn, of Highland Heights. "My son, like most young adults, is pretty phone savvy so I was sure he knew what to do." The troubling part of Shinn's data usage woes is this: Her husband died 18 months ago. "I kept his phone active until recently so I could deal with any business or other calls that might come in that needed to be addressed. " His phone suddenly started using small amounts of data. Shinn insists her late husband's phone isn't used for anything other than looking at phone numbers of missed calls or dealing with incoming calls. How, she asks, is her late husband's phone using data? Overall, she's upset about the over-limit fees -- $75 on her son's account and $30 on hers. But more than that, she's upset that she's being deceived. "We are definitely being ripped off," Shinn said. Karen Savena of Broadview Heights feels the same. Her oldest son has a 6 GB per month plan, and usage has been inexplicably soaring since spring. When he reaches his data limit each month, he immediately shuts off his data. Yet every month for the last four month, his data exceeded his limit. The totals: 6.00900; GB 6.00200; GB 6.01100 GB; and 6.00400 GB. How did he exceed 6 GB? Verizon notified him when he reached his limit. It's the notification that Verizon sent that pushed him over. Yes, the alert is what caused the $10 over-limit fee. If that doesn't make you irate, chew on a few things I learned this month when I talked with Stephen Van Dinter, a manager for Verizon's Great Lakes region. Verizon insists that many customers' problems hinge on the infamous "Wi-Fi Assist" button, Van Dinter said. With iPhones, this is automatically "on" under iOS9, which was introduced a year ago. This allows the phone to switch to costly data if the phone decides the internet connection is poor. What's the definition of "poor"? Dunno. Right now, that's a secret. But it racks up data. With Droids, the default on this Wi-Fi function is off. However, even customers with Droids are seeing surges in data.  Verizon says that when my phone records, and those of hundreds of other people, show data usage in the middle of the night, that's not really accurate. If the records show you used data at 1:47 a.m., for example, when you were fast asleep, that may not be accurate. Verizon reports data in six-hour windows, Van Dinter said. So data usage at 1:47 a.m. may not really have been at 1:47 a.m., he said. "It could be at any hour in that six-hour time frame."  I believe Verizon realizes it has a problem with over-limit charges. That must be the reason the company just this week rolled out its "safety mode" feature for all new plans at no extra charge. It works like this: When you reach your data limit, whatever level you're paying for, Verizon will allow you to continue using data -- but at a much slower speed of 128 kbps for the rest of the billing cycle. So you'll go over your limit, but you won't pay extra, Van Dinter said. Until this past week, "safety mode" cost $5 a month unless you had a new plan of 16 GB or more. So if you were a normal family with 2 or 4 or 8 GB, which is enough for most households, you had to pay extra for "safety mode." Until now. So back to my account. My family's use has basically doubled from 8 GB to 16 GB a month. The Verizon manager, Van Dinter, said that a supervisor in customer service could dig into the specifics of my account and answer a lot of the questions about my usage. That should help me answer other people's questions and we can all get to the bottom of this mystery that is dipping into our wallets. I'm still waiting for that follow-up call. I have a long list of questions for Verizon, and a few for Apple. Here they are: Why are people's phones using data at times when they're on their home Wi-Fi and the Wi-Fi Assist button is off? If there's any truth to that six-hour window thing, consider this: I walked my dog at 8 a.m. Tuesday. I walked him again at 8:30 a.m. Wednesday. In between that time, I didn't leave my house except to take out the trash and to check the mailbox. (It was too darn hot!) I didn't leave my property for about 24 hours. I was on my home's very strong Wi-Fi. My Wi-Fi Assist button is off. Why did my phone ping cellular data 11 times during this period? Why are people's phones using data in the middle of the night when the phones aren't being used and are turned off or on do-not-disturb?  Why do people still go over their data even if they totally turn off their data as soon as they're notified that they're at their limit? How can phones with the data function blocked use data? Do new (replacement) phones use data differently? Like if you get a new 6s to replace your old 6s? If Safety Mode is such a great customer service, why was it just offered as a free option this week for all customers with new plans? If Safety Mode is such as great customer service, why isn't it available for all customers?  If Verizon has known for a year that the Wi-Fi Assist button was causing many customers to use data without their knowledge, why not send a push text to all customers or include an alert with people's bills?  If the Wi-Fi Assist or Avoid Bad Wi-Fi features have been a problem for a year, why did customers start encountering data surges only four or five months ago? And the data use has continued to increase every month for many customers without explanation. When customers call Verizon to complain about data usage, why is the default response from customer service to recommend that they switch their plans and increase their data usage? Why aren't all customers encouraged to look at their Wi-Fi Assist or Avoid Bad Wi-Fi buttons, or their Background App Refresh button, or their Location Services, or other things that could drive up data use? Instead, the customary response given to customers is often: Buy more data. If the times of the data pings aren't necessarily accurate and are really only within a six-hour window, how is it that the phone call time stamps are accurate to the minute?   For people who have their Wi-Fi Assist/ Avoid Bad Wi-Fi buttons turned on, what's the definition of "poor" Wi-Fi? Who makes that determination? Apple or another phone manufacturer? Verizon?  I'd rather be the one to make that decision rather than allow my phone to decide what Wi-Fi strength is acceptable. Some people say that Verizon has told them that their phones sleep when they're not used for long periods. Supposedly, during this time, the phones revert to the LTE data network instead of Wi-Fi. Is this true?   Some people say that Verizon has told them their phones are pinged in the middle of the night to make sure they're working. Is this true? Will customers who were harangued into increasing their data usage be able to switch back to their old plan at the same price? I expect to get answers from Verizon, Apple, regulators and others. Stay tuned.
211720 points by The Plain Dealer | Data Cuyahoga County Ohio Laptop AT&T Telephone Mobile phone Bill Nintendo DS
GRAPHIC: Police department shows devastating effects of heroin

-1 points by Atlanta Journal Constitution | English-language films Woman Female Hugh Padgham Leo White 2004 singles Ohio Jess Robbins
Democratic groups join forces in $4 million effort to boost top Senate prospects
Nearly all the Senate races are key to Democrats' hopes of regaining the Senate majority.
44 points by The Washington Post | Election United States Senate United States Democratic Party Ohio Elections President pro tempore of the United States Senate Voting
Donald Trump, ahead in new Ohio poll, swings through Cleveland: Ohio Politics Roundup
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump visits a Cleveland charter school to talk education. The billionaire leads Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton in Ohio by 4 points, according to a new Quinnipiac University poll. Read more in today's Ohio Politics Roundup. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump visits a Cleveland charter school to talk education. The billionaire leads Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton in Ohio by 4 points, according to a new Quinnipiac University poll. Read more in today's Ohio Politics Roundup. Trump's Throwback Thursday: During a visit to a charter school on Cleveland's East Side, Trump looked to the past while continuing to make his case for an urban agenda, cleveland.com's Andrew J. Tobias reported. "If we can put a man on the moon, dig out the Panama Canal and win two World Wars, I have no doubt that we can provide school choice to every disadvantaged child in the country," Trump said during his 40-minute speech, which focused on education issues. The scene at Trump's visit: Trump fans and detractors peacefully faced off before the billionaire's appearance at the Cleveland Arts & Social Sciences Academy charter school, cleveland.com reporter Henry Gomez writes. "Fans of the Republican nominee for president outnumbered the foes. Their encounter was mostly peaceful, but hardly polite," writes Gomez, who posted a video of the encounter. "Most of those outside demonstrating against Trump were abortion-rights advocates who are upset with the New York businessman's shifty, but ultimately anti-abortion stance." Background on Trump's charter school visit: The owner of the charter school Trump visited, Ron Packard, is a "major figure in the national charter school community for years," Plain Dealer reporter Patrick O'Donnell writes. "He's also made several moves in the last two years to be a significant charter school force in Ohio." Packard said he did not offer his school to Trump because he is a supporter. "My position is irrelevant," he said. "I wouldn't say I am a supporter or I'm not. I support school choice and what's relevant is the attention for high quality charter schools." Trump's visit to CASSA was not without controversy, O'Donnell writes. Critics "blasted the choice of CASSA for Trump's speech today, pointing to the school's poor grades on Ohio's 2014-15 school report cards," O'Donnell writes. "CASSA, located at 10701 Shaker Blvd., received a D for Performance Index, a composite of scores across multiple grades and subjects that Ohio uses to summarize results." Things are looking up for Trump in Ohio:  The billionaire leads Clinton in the Buckeye State by 4 points, according to a new Quinnipiac University poll. "The Quinnipiac University survey marks the first time Trump has led an Ohio presidential poll since May," cleveland.com reporter Jeremy Pelzer writes. "The survey found that Trump leads Clinton 41 percent to 37 percent among likely Ohio voters. Libertarian nominee Gary Johnson polled 14 percent, while the Green Party's Jill Stein had 4 percent support. In a head-to-head matchup, the poll found that Trump is ahead of Clinton 46 percent to 45 percent. "The results show that Ohio's presidential election may ultimately be decided by supporters of Johnson, the former governor of New Mexico, according to Peter A. Brown, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University poll." Ohio generals support Clinton: Two Ohio generals stressed their support for Clinton in Cleveland on Tuesday, ahead of Trump's visit. "Four Star Retired Gen. Johnnie Wilson, who grew up in Lorain, emphasized Clinton's commitment to the military and their families -- and said he was hurt by Trump's criticism of a Khizr Khan, a Muslim American military father who lost his son in Iraq," I write in my report. "Hillary has been a staunch supporter of the military her entire adult life," Wilson said.  "She understands what a military family endures."  Higher taxes? Ten school districts across Cuyahoga County plan to ask voters in this November for more money. "Four of those issues ask voters to approve more tax dollars for expenses. Another two are bond issues that would raise money for school construction and renovation," cleveland.com reporter Robert Higgs writes. "The remaining four issues are a combination of the two - issues that would allow the district to sell bonds for construction and improvement projects and levy a tax to pay off those bonds. They also would levy an additional tax for further improvements." Protecting victims: People who survived domestic abuse can now vote in Ohio without having their address becoming public, cleveland.com reporter Emily Bamforth writes. "The Safe At Home program aims to protect Ohioans whose abusers might seek out their public information," Bamforth writes. "Its launch comes a month before the deadline for voter registration for this year's presidential election." Marijuana and Ohio: Medical marijuana became legal in Ohio on Thursday -- but patients won't be able to purchase the drug in the Buckeye State for another year or two, cleveland.com reporter Jackie Borchardt writes. "Starting today, patients who would qualify for the program have an 'affirmative defense' against prosecution for possessing marijuana and paraphernalia that would be legal under the law, if a doctor signs off," Borchardt writes. "The affirmative defense only protects patients using one of the forms described in the law: Marijuana-infused edibles, tinctures, oils, patches and plant material. The law prohibits smoking marijuana and allows vaping, but the final list of approved forms and methods will be decided by the Ohio State Board of Pharmacy." The law doesn't make it clear how patients are supposed to procure the drug. It's illegal to grow in Ohio, and it's against federal law to bring marijuana from a legal state into Ohio. Meanwhile: A state lawmaker is asking Ohio municipalities to not ban or restrict medical marijuana. "In an open letter, Sen. Kenny Yuko acknowledged the concerns communities have about Ohio's new medical marijuana law but reminded them it will be months or even years before businesses will be growing or selling marijuana," Borchardt writes. "The Richmond Heights Democrat issued the letter on Wednesday, the day before Ohio's medical marijuana took effect." "I understand the urge to act, but keep an open mind," Yuko wrote. "Please consider all the good that this medicine can do for the citizens of your communities." Other parts of the country watching Ohio: Medical marijuana observers in Colorado, a state that helped pioneer the drug, see potential in Ohio's future marketplace. "Medicine Man was among the first medical marijuana companies in Colorado, and it plans to help Ohio businesses get off the ground. Carrie Roberts, a licensing consultant with the company's consulting arm, Medicine Man Technologies, said the law's medical conditions and allowed forms should encourage a healthy market," Borchardt writes. "The rules we've seen so far are very robust and it looks like Ohio could be a very good marketplace both for patients and business operators," Roberts told Borchardt.  Ohio Senate race: Democratic U.S. Senate nominee Ted Strickland's campaign is criticizing a new Rob Portman TV ad, which touts the senator's work on behalf of an Ohio company previously accused of delivering faulty helmets to the U.S. Army, cleveland.com reporter Jeremy Pelzer reports. The ad, seen on the air in Cleveland, highlights the Republican senator's efforts to ensure Hebron-based ArmorSource was able to successfully bid to make the Army's lightweight advanced combat helmet, securing more than 200 jobs. But earlier this year, ArmorSource paid $3 million to settle allegations that a different kind of helmet, sold to the U.S. military between 2006 and 2009, failed ballistic safety tests. Strickland campaign spokesman David Bergstein said in a statement that Portman should apologize to Ohio's military families and take down the ad. "It's hard to know what's worse: that Senator Portman would champion a company that was endangering the lives of our military service members by producing faulty helmets, or that Portman is using this same company to try and win his political campaign," Bergstein said. Portman campaign spokeswoman Michawn Rich said in a statement that the Republican incumbent is "proud" to have helped ArmorSource secure the contract. An ArmorSource spokesman didn't return a phone call Wednesday seeking comment. Beautiful politicos: Bay Village native and Rep. Tim Ryan legislative aide Samantha Fay made The Hill's 50 most beautiful list. How exciting for her. In a short profile, the 25-year-old reveals her feelings about makeup. We learn that, for Fay, "having a polished look is just as important in her professional life as having refined policy chops," The Hill writes. "Wearing makeup is like putting on your war paint," Fay told the Hill. "It calms me down, I can relax into it, and at the end of it, I feel like I am ready for anything." She also likes to dance. Get Battleground Briefing, our FREE politics newsletter, delivered to your inbox: Sign up here. Tips or links? Send here. Follow along on Twitter: @_marykilpatrick.
254 points by The Plain Dealer | Ohio Charter school Cannabis President of the United States Legality of cannabis by country Charter Hillary Rodham Clinton United States presidential election 2008
Grocery chain pulls Halloween 'syringe pens' after complaints
Kroger stores are pulling some Halloween accessories from shelves after getting customer complaints.
92 points by Atlanta Journal Constitution | Kroger Naloxone Supermarket Ohio Heroin Morphine Drug addiction Hypermarket
Will: Senator’s no populist, still popular
TERRACE PARK, Ohio — U.S. Sen. Rob Portman probably will win a second term, despite the fact that he deserves to. The swarm of young people who gathered on a Saturday morning in this Cincinnati suburb to feast on doughnuts and his gratitude are among the 5,000 volunteer interns, including students from 35 campuses, who have made 3.5 million voter contacts. Portman’s supporters are a forgiving sort, undeterred by his many accomplishments and qualifications that could be disqualifying in this season of populist antagonism toward people who have actually governed.
-1 points by Boston Herald | Ohio George W. Bush Republican Party President of the United States William Howard Taft Warren G. Harding George H. W. Bush Ohio Republicans
Man sentenced after admitting to attempted rape of child
LEBANON, Ohio (AP) - Prosecutors in southwest Ohio say a man has been sentenced to serve a decade in prison after admitting he tried to rape a young child. Warren County prosecutors announced on Thursday that 29-year-old Jonathan Schneider had been sentenced this week after pleading guilty to felony counts ...
-1 points by The Washington Times | Criminal law Sexual intercourse Assault Statutory rape Lebanon Ohio Rape Crimes Pennsylvania
Feds: Steel mill cited for failing to protect, train workers
CANTON, Ohio (AP) - Federal investigators have cited a northeast Ohio steel mill for safety violations, including that workers weren't protected from a dangerous atmosphere caused by chemicals leaking into the ventilation system. WEWS-TV reports (http://bit.ly/2cH9KuV ) documents released by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration say TimkenSteel also failed ...
-1 points by The Washington Times | Occupational safety and health Akron Ohio Ohio English-language films Nitrogen HVAC Water Laborer
See the Ohio and U.S. State of the Climate overview for August
NOAA has released the August 2016 regional, statewide, and nationwide climate analysis.
5 points by The Plain Dealer | United States Cuyahoga County Ohio Cleveland Ohio Climate Drought Cuyahoga River Temperature
Ohio colleges field queries from potential ITT transfers
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) - Some Ohio colleges are fielding queries from potential transfer students left stranded in the midst of their studies when the for-profit chain ITT Technical Institute closed its campuses. The for-profit college closed its more than 130 campuses across 38 states after the U.S. Department of Education ...
-1 points by The Washington Times | University Ohio Democratic Party U.S. state United States State Sherrod Brown George Voinovich
Mother says special needs son forcibly baptized; robber calls judge 'slave master'; infant dies at homeless shelter: Overnight News Links
Also, Donald Trump leads Hillary Clinton in latest Ohio poll; Cleveland Beer Week director accused of stealing $40,000 in scholarship money; Avon police sergeant admits having one beer before drunken-driving arrest Featured stories Mother says special needs son was forcibly baptized at Geauga County church (WKYC Channel 3) Bank robber who acted as own attorney calls Lake County judge 'slave master' at sentencing (News-Herald) Infant who died at Dayton homeless shelter was a twin (Dayton Daily News) Crime Cleveland Beer Week director accused of stealing $40,000 in scholarship money (cleveland.com) 'Extremely delusional' North Olmsted youth pastor sentenced for sexual relationship with teen (cleveland.com) Two accused of causing crash while fleeing Eastlake police (photos) (cleveland.com) Berea man sentenced for rape of Soviet-era labor camp survivor (cleveland.com) Garfield Heights detectives arrest suspect in restaurant robberies (video) (cleveland.com) North Ridgeville abduction case may be linked to Elyria, Cleveland (WKYC Channel 3) Lorain County couple arrested in connection with alleged child abuse case (Lorain Morning Journal) Cleveland / Cuyahoga County Cleveland police's proposed use-of-force policy designed to address past issues (cleveland.com) Donald Trump proposes expanded 'school choice' during visit to Cleveland charter school (cleveland.com) No water in a hot Cleveland school? Depends who you ask (cleveland.com) Cleveland artist to live inside giant wooden sphere made from demolished houses (cleveland.com) 10 Cuyahoga County school districts have new taxes on the November ballot: Here's the list (cleveland.com) Local news East 20 Lake County restaurants, other food places with most health inspection violations (cleveland.com) Man worth millions says he needed food stamps (WKYC Channel 3) Vietnam Veterans Memorial traveling wall comes to Geauga County (News-Herald) Local news West Avon police sergeant admits having one beer before drunken-driving arrest (video) (cleveland.com) Florida man dies after crash on Ohio Turnpike (Lorain Morning Journal) Willard man struck, killed on Ohio 61 (Sandusky Register) Akron / Canton area Death of man at Brandywine Falls in Cuyahoga Valley National Park ruled suicide by medical examiner (cleveland.com) Akron awarded $5 million to reimagine civic spaces, bring diverse communities together (cleveland.com) State Donald Trump leads Hillary Clinton in latest Ohio poll (cleveland.com) Retired generals from Ohio stress their support for Hillary Clinton ahead of Donald Trump's Cleveland appearance (cleveland.com) Medical marijuana is now legal in Ohio but not much changes for patients (cleveland.com) Ohio lawmaker urges cities not to ban medical marijuana before state sets rules (cleveland.com)  Ohio mine workers seek pension relief on Capitol Hill (photos and video) (cleveland.com) How to build a highway: A tour of an Ohio Turnpike construction zone (cleveland.com)
1 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Greater Cleveland Lorain County Ohio Summit County Ohio Akron Ohio Ohio Lake County Ohio Elyria Ohio
Politics of lopsided victories vary between college football coaches
PHOENIX – Ohio State Coach Urban Meyer was critical of his starting receivers after the Buckeyes’ opener against Bowling Green. Same thing with most of the offensive linemen and Ohio State’s kickoff coverage unit. The defensive backs “did okay.”All this after Ohio State set a school record with 776...
-1 points by Concord Monitor | American football Urban Meyer Jim Harbaugh Ohio Coaching Oak Ridge Associated Universities Defense Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities
Send Rob Portman back to Washington
Ohio Sen. Rob Portman probably will win a second term, despite the fact that he deserves to        
-1 points by The Detroit News | Ohio Republican Party William Howard Taft Warren G. Harding Ohio Republicans Robert Taft Bob Taft William Henry Harrison
North Carolina board makes measured choices on voting plans
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina's Republican-controlled Board of Elections took a measured approach Thursday to settling local quarrels over early voting plans, refusing to expand voting on Sundays this fall but increasing access to the ballot in counties where…
-1 points by Arizona Daily Star | North Carolina Raleigh North Carolina Charlotte North Carolina Elections Voting Rights Act President of the United States Democracy Ohio
The Latest: Early voting in Charlotte expanded by state
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The Latest on early voting plans being decided by the North Carolina State Board of Elections (all times local):
-1 points by Arizona Daily Star | North Carolina Elections Abraham Lincoln Ohio Red states and blue states Maryland Maine Louisiana
Death of man at Brandywine Falls in Cuyahoga Valley National Park ruled suicide by medical examiner
The death of a man found at Brandywine Falls Tuesday has been ruled a suicide by the Summit County Medical Examiner's Office. Watch video AKRON, Ohio -- An elderly man found dead at Brandywine Falls Tuesday took his own life, according to the Summit County Medical Examiner's Office. The office identified the man as 71-year-old August C. Voight, of Brecksville. Voight died of multiple blunt force injuries, Gary Gunther, chief investigator with the medical examiner's office, said Thursday. Voight was found at the base of a cliff overlooking a 65-foot waterfall on the eastern edge of the Cuyahoga Valley National Park in Sagamore Hills. Previous coverage: Elderly man found dead at Brandywine Falls in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park Voight's death is the third in the area since the falls became part of the national park. In 1995, a man fell over the boardwalk fence and died. There wasn't another death there until May 2011 when a 31-year-old Canal Fulton man died after falling from the top of the falls.    If you wish to discuss or comment on this story, please visit our crime and courts comments section. Like Chanda Neely on Facebook. Follow me on Twitter: Follow @ChandaNeely // !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+'://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js';fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document, 'script', 'twitter-wjs'); // ]]>
45 points by The Plain Dealer | Ohio and Erie Canal Cuyahoga Valley National Park Summit County Ohio Akron Ohio Death Brecksville Ohio Cuyahoga County Ohio Life
Trump, Clinton deadlocked in Ohio, Florida: polls
Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are deadlocked the key battleground states of Ohio and Florida, a pair of polls released Thursday showed.
17 points by Daily News | United States presidential election 2008 U.S. state North Carolina Pennsylvania Southern United States Ohio President of the United States United States
Top high school football games this week
A look at two of the top high school football games in the Southland: Friday Las Vegas Bishop Gorman (2-0) vs. Bellflower St. John Bosco (2-0) at Long Beach Veterans Memorial Stadium, 7:30 p.m. (Prime Ticket): Bishop Gorman has never lost with Ohio State commit Tate Martell as its quarterback. ...
52 points by Los Angeles Times | Time Warner American football Time Warner Cable Veteran John Bosco 2000s American television series English-language films Columbus Ohio
Cleveland Beer Week director accused of stealing $40,000 in scholarship money
Christine Montague, 48, is accused of stealing more than $40,000 from Cleveland Beer Week's scholarship funds. Christine MontagueBedford City Jail  CLEVELAND, Ohio -- The program director of Cleveland Beer Week is accused of stealing $40,000 in charitable donations that the organization uses to fund scholarships. Christine Montague, 48, is charged with grand theft and forgery. She is scheduled for arraignment Sept. 21 in Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Court. Montague stole $44,849 from Cleveland Beer Week during a two-year span from January 2014 to the end of 2015, according to court records. Montague, who served as the program's director since 2009, siphoned funds donated to the organization for the Malone Foundation scholarship program, according to court records. She earned a $10,000 yearly salary to serve as the program's director and the public face of the event giving interviews to media outlets promoting the event. But instead of sending the payments to the scholarship fund, she paid herself, according to a Bedford Heights police investigation. Montague was arrested Aug. 8 and is free on a $25,000 surety bond. She did not immediately return a call seeking comment. John Lane, of the Winking Lizard, who is one of four operating board members for Cleveland Beer Week, said he couldn't elaborate on the charges or how the organization found out about the missing money. Bedford Heights police did not provide a copy of the police report on Thursday. "We absolutely can't do as much for the charity," Lane said. "We're trying to keep our momentum going forward and just move on." Another board member, Ed Thompkins of Heinen's, said the theft has not impacted this year's Beer Week, set for Oct. 14 through Oct. 22. "Basically, we're still going full steam ahead," Thompkins said. To comment on this story, please visit our crime and courts comments section.
394 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Scholarship Corporate governance Crime Fiduciary Board of directors Scholarships Bedford Ohio
Team USA hockey coach: If players sit through the national anthem, they'll stay seated
When asked about 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick and his much discussed protest, John Tortorella didn’t mince words.
156 points by Atlanta Journal Constitution | Columbus Ohio San Francisco 49ers The Star-Spangled Banner United States United States Army Game The Columbus Dispatch Ice hockey
'Extremely delusional' North Olmsted youth pastor sentenced for sexual relationship with teen
North Olmsted youth pastor Brian Mitchell, 31, was sentenced Thursday for carrying on a sexual relationship with a 16-year-old girl. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A North Olmsted youth pastor will spend a decade in prison for carrying on a sexual relationship with a 16-year-old member of his church. Brian Mitchell, 31, sat Thursday with his brow furrowed for most of the 90-minute hearing where Cuyahoga County Judge Patrick Corrigan sentenced him to 10 years in prison. Mitchell -- a husband and father of three children under the age of 8-- was the youth pastor at Columbia Road Baptist Church in North Olmsted when he met the victim. He pleaded guilty to four counts of sexual battery. "I'm so sorry to (the) family," Mitchell said. "I can't imagine the work and effort you've had to put into fixing your family." The girl in a letter to the judge that she looked up to Mitchell, and that she sought him out to learn how to live a more spiritual life through religion. Mitchell began sending her text messages that became more and more frequent. Someone brought it to the attention of church leaders and the texting stopped for a time. He started up again, and the girl said the tone of the messages quickly turned from innocent and fun to serious. She said he complained about his wife and their marital problems. She wrote that she wanted the texts to stop but felt scared to say anything because he was a powerful figure in the church and in her life. One day, he drove to her home and told her to come out to his car. He kissed her and told her he wanted to see her again. The next time he drove out to her home, he had sex with her in his car. Another time he had sex with her at her home while his wife was out of town, Assistant Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Kristen Karkutt said. "I did not give him permission," the girl wrote. "I clearly said 'no, didn't want to.' I felt like he tricked me." Mitchell directed her to delete text message exchanges between the two and told her never to tell anyone. He picked her up during her lunch break from school. He sent her flowers for her birthday, then asked her mother at church if she knew who sent them. Normally an outgoing teen who played sports and worked two jobs while going to school, she found herself unable to get out of bed. She struggled in school. Once the relationship came to light, the church reported the accusations to Fairview Park police. The girl's mother said in court that church officials told her their family couldn't return to the church until she apologized to Mitchell's wife. Defense attorney Ian Friedman said Mitchell was never aware of that. The family has since left the church. The girl wrote that she still has nightmares and displays what Corrigan called textbook symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. "This is a perfect example of the psychological damage caused by these types of crimes," Corrigan said. Friedman said Mitchell acknowledges that he betrayed the girl, her family, his own family and the church. "The whirlwind two or three months of Snapchats and texts and the secrecy involved created an adrenaline- and lust-filled situation where he felt like there could be a future," Friedman said.   Mitchell, who received about three-dozen letters of support given to the judge, apologized to the girl's family and said he was sorry for what he did, not that he got caught.  He said that he dreamed of being a father and asked for leniency in order to take care of his kids. Corrigan, who had the option to sentence him anywhere between one and 20 years in prison, did not adopt Friedman's recommendation for house arrest. "Your delusional excuse -- that there were emotions and love involved -- is troubling," Corrigan told Mitchell. "That's extremely delusional." To comment on this story, please visit our crime and courts comments section.
4572 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Text messaging North Olmsted Ohio Fairview Park Ohio SMS Marriage Olmsted Township Cuyahoga County Ohio Mother
Two accused of causing crash while fleeing Eastlake police (photos)
Two Cleveland residents are accused of causing a car crash during a short police chase Sunday in Euclid. Brandy TillettEastlake police  Joshua Bailey.jpgEastlake police  EASTLAKE, Ohio -- Two Cleveland residents are accused of causing a car crash following a short police chase Sunday in Eastlake. Officers tried to stop a 2006 Ford after learning the people inside were suspected of shoplifting at Walmart on Vine Street. The driver refused to stop and crashed into a van on Euclid Avenue, police said. The crash pushed the Ford into a street sign and several trees and caused it to overturn. Officers arrested a passenger in the car and arrested the driver hiding nearby, police said. The driver, Brandy Tillett, 32, of Cleveland, is charged with theft, receiving stolen property, failure to comply, reckless operation and driving without a valid license. Her passenger, Joshua Bailey, 32, of Cleveland, is charged with theft, receiving stolen property, resisting arrest and assaulting a police officer. Tillett and Bailey pleaded not guilty during their arraignments Tuesday in Willoughby Municipal Court. Both are scheduled to appeared at preliminary hearings Sept. 13, records show. A Walmart employee reported just after 8:45 p.m. that two people loaded a cart full of merchandise into their car and drove away. An Eastlake officer spotted the car turning onto SOM Center Road from Vine Street. The driver ignored the officer's order to stop and kept driving onto the Lakeland Freeway toward Interstate 90. The van hit the Ford's passenger side at Euclid Avenue, police said. The van's passengers were taken to Hillcrest Hospital for treatment of non-life-threatening injuries. At least one person in the van suffered a broken shoulder, court records show. Officers arrested Bailey in the overturned Ford. They found Tillett hiding in a recycling bin outside a house on East 267th Street, police said. Neither Bailey nor Tillett was injured. Investigators later learned the Ford had been reported stolen in Elyria, records show. To comment on this story, please visit our crime and courts comments section.
2 points by The Plain Dealer | Crime Arrest English-language films Resisting arrest Cuyahoga County Ohio Theft Greater Cleveland Cleveland
Suspect in slaying of Ohio college student pleads not guilty
WAUSEON, Ohio (AP) — An Ohio man charged with killing a college student who disappeared while riding her bicycle has pleaded not guilty to aggravated murder charges that carry the possibility of a death sentence.
-1 points by Arizona Daily Star | Murder University Ohio Toledo Ohio University of Toledo Assault Criminal law Barbra Streisand
Free hot dog offered with a ticket to "Sausage Party"
Regal Cinemas is offering a voucher for a free hot dog to everyone who buys a ticket to "Sausage Party." CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Theatergoers have a chance to get free food the next time they see the summer's hit R-rated comedy "Sausage Party." In what is likely an attempt to boost lagging ticket sales, Regal Cinemas is offering a hot dog voucher to everyone who buys a ticket to see the raunchy farce about anthropomorphic foodstuffs between Friday and Sunday. Northeast Ohio has eight Regal Cinemas theaters located in Willoughby, Richmond Heights, Middleburg Heights, North Olmsted, Westlake, Medina, Hudson and Akron. Sausage Party has made more than $100 million at the box office so far -- against a modest $19 million budget -- but tickets sales have fallen off since its August 12 premiere. It brought in a pedestrian $5.2 million in ticket sales last weekend, finishing fifth behind "Don't Breathe," "Suicide Squad," "Kubo and the Two Strings," and "Pete's Dragon."
21 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Cities in Ohio Movie theater Greater Cleveland Box office Akron Ohio Brook Park Ohio Ticket
Cuyahoga County has record number of opiate deaths in August
CLEVELAND (AP) - A medical examiner in Cleveland says a record number of people fatally overdosed from heroin, fentanyl, carfentanil or some combination of the three drugs in Cuyahoga County last month. The medical examiner on Thursday said testing had found carfentanil, a sedative used on large animals such as ...
-1 points by The Washington Times | Coroner Heroin Illegal drug trade Drugs National Football League Ohio Labor Day Suicide
Scenes from a Donald Trump event in Cleveland (video)
Supporters and protesters turned out Thursday for Donald Trump's speech at the Cleveland Arts & Social Sciences Academy charter school. Watch video CLEVELAND, Ohio - Supporters and protesters turned out Thursday for Donald Trump's speech at the Cleveland Arts & Social Sciences Academy charter school. Fans of the Republican nominee for president outnumbered the foes. Their encounter was mostly peaceful, but hardly polite. Most of those outside demonstrating against Trump were abortion-rights advocates who are upset with the New York businessman's shifty, but ultimately anti-abortion stance. One woman waiting to enter the school panned her cell phone camera around the crowd of protesters, calling out "murderer supporter" each time she landed on a new face. Another protester clashed with an attendee over Trump's ties to Russia. You can watch the video above. Trump was making his second visit to Northeast Ohio in four days. He and running mate Mike Pence met with several union leaders on Labor Day in Brook Park. They also stopped that afternoon at the Canfield Fair - Ohio's largest county fair - in suburban Youngstown. The speech at the school placed Trump a mile away from where his Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton, spoke on Labor Day - at the 11th Congressional District festival in Luke Easter Park.
1 points by The Plain Dealer | Democratic Party Youngstown Ohio George W. Bush Bill Clinton Hillary Rodham Clinton Ohio Donald Trump New York City
Donald Trump leads Hillary Clinton in latest Ohio poll
The Quinnipiac University survey marks the first time Trump has led an Ohio presidential poll since May. COLUMBUS, Ohio--Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has a 4-point lead in Ohio over Democratic rival Hillary Clinton, according to a poll released Thursday. The Quinnipiac University survey marks the first time Trump has led an Ohio presidential poll since May. The survey found that Trump leads Clinton 41 percent to 37 percent among likely Ohio voters. Libertarian nominee Gary Johnson polled 14 percent, while the Green Party's Jill Stein had 4 percent support. The results show that Ohio's presidential election may ultimately be decided by supporters of Johnson, the former governor of New Mexico, according to Peter A. Brown, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University poll. "He is getting 14 percent from Ohio voters, and how that cohort eventually votes could be critical in this swing state - and in the nation," Brown said in a statement. Thursday's poll is the first survey of the presidential race in Ohio to be released this month. The last Quinnipiac poll of Ohio, released nearly a month ago, showed Clinton with a 2-point lead among likely Buckeye State voters.  The new poll shows only 88 percent of Democratic likely voters in Ohio back Clinton - down from 95 percent support in last month's survey. The survey also showed that Trump gained support among likely male voters in the state, while Clinton lost backing among Ohio men. However, Trump's support among independent voters fell to 43 percent, compared to 50 percent in last month's Quinnipiac poll. For reasons that aren't completely clear yet, Clinton's lead in national polls has slipped since mid-August, when she led Trump by about 8 percentage points. The new Quinnipiac poll was conducted by phone between Aug. 29 and Sept. 7 among 775 registered Ohio voters. The poll has a margin of error of +/- 3.5 percentage points.  Follow @TwitterDev
2470 points by The Plain Dealer | United States presidential election 2008 President of the United States Voting Ohio Democratic Party Hillary Rodham Clinton United States United States presidential election 1968
Berea man sentenced for rape of Soviet-era labor camp survivor
Jason Farmer, 30, was sentenced to 25 years in prison for breaking into an 81-year-old woman's apartment and raping her. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A Berea man will spend the next quarter-century in prison for the rape of an 81-year-old woman who survived a Soviet-era labor camp as a child. Jason Farmer, 30, stood and watched Thursday as the woman described the gruesome incident and how it has affected her in the twilight of her life, which included watching as a young child as Nazis kill her father and her time spent as a teenager in a Siberian labor camp.  Cuyahoga County Judge Deena Calabrese sentenced Farmer, who previously pleaded guilty to rape, kidnapping and aggravated burglary in the Feb. 11 attack. Farmer is now a Tier III sex offender, meaning he must report his address to the county sheriff every 90 days for the rest of his life once he's released from prison. "In all my years as a county prosecutor and now judge, this is one of the most brutal rapes I've ever seen," Calabrese said. The woman said during the hearing that she knew Farmer who often took walks around her neighborhood. She used to give him a $1 or $2 when he asked because she felt sorry for him. Farmer knocked on the woman's door at her Berea apartment. The woman opened the door, but refused to let him inside. He forced his way into the apartment, cutting the woman's forearm as she tried to slam the door shut. Farmer picked her up and threw her over his shoulder "like potatoes," the woman said. He carried her to her bedroom and raped her. The woman offered Farmer all her money to stop. He did, and took $7. Farmer then told the woman to not tell anyone about the incident. The woman said she was too scared to report the incident but eventually told a neighbor, who convinced her to go to the hospital. Berea police interviewed Farmer, who denied responsibility. DNA from the sexual-assault kit matched Farmer, whose DNA was in the national database because of three prior theft-related felony convictions. Police confronted him with the new evidence and he confessed. The woman said the rape left her unable to stay at her apartment and scared she'll be attacked again. She also said she's bewildered by the attacked. "I could be his great-grandmother," the woman said in broken English. "Why would you want to touch an old lady like that?" Calabrese replied: "No woman should be touched like that." The woman grew up in Slovenia until Nazis stormed into her home at about age 10, hit her father with the butt of a rifle, dragged him out of the home and shot him, according to St. Paul Lutheran Pastor Tom Henderson. He said she was given to a pig farmer, who also ran a bar. The man would allow his bar patrons to rape her in an attic above where the pigs were kept. She was then taken to a Siberian labor camp, and later to a camp in Bosnia, Henderson said. She ended up in the U.S. in 1952. She lived in the Broadway-Fleet neighborhood until gunfire became too regular for her taste. Despite being a poor widow, she moved to the apartment in Berea. "Berea was so beautiful," she said. "I could leave my windows open all the time and I didn't lock my doors sometimes. He would have to be not normal to do this." Farmer suffers from bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, defense attorney Patrick DiChiro said. Farmer's IQ is estimated at 72 and has a first-grade reading ability, DiChiro said.  "I didn't mean to cause that much harm," he said during the hearing. "I want to say I'm sorry."  To comment on this story, please visit our crime and courts comments section.
974 points by The Plain Dealer | Labor camp Cuyahoga County Ohio Felony Rape
Illinois OKs six-year, $21 million contract for Smith
URBANA, Ill. (AP) — University of Illinois trustees have approved a contract with football coach Lovie Smith that will pay him at least $21 million over six years.
-1 points by Arizona Daily Star | Illinois Lovie Smith Chicago Bears Ohio Chicago Urbana Illinois Michigan Champaign Illinois
‘Abortion is murder’ initiative could be headed to Ohio voters
Three Christians in Ohio are defiantly trying to overrule the landmark Supreme Court decision Roe v Wade by proposing a voter referendum that would classify abortion as “aggravated murder.” Read Full Article at RT.com
509 points by Russia Today | Roe v. Wade In vitro fertilisation Abortion Ohio Pro-choice Democratic Party Supreme Court of the United States Reproduction
Hillary Clinton leads Donald Trump in Pa., N.C.; OH, Fla. close: Quinnipiac
Hillary Clinton holds single-digit leads over Donald Trump in head-to-head matchups in the battleground states of Pennsylvania and North Carolina, while the two candidates are tied in Florida and Mr. Trump is slightly ahead in Ohio, according to Quinnipiac University polling released Thursday. Head-to-head, Mrs. Clinton held a ...
32 points by The Washington Times | United States presidential election 2008 President of the United States Democratic Party Ohio Southern United States Bill Clinton Hillary Rodham Clinton U.S. state
Trieu: MSU gets shot to sway 4-star LB Henderson
Jaquan Henderson, a four-star from Covington (Ga.) Newton, is committed to Tennessee, and has been since June, but will visit Michigan State this fall.        
-1 points by The Detroit News | Big Ten Conference Ohio Michigan State University University of Michigan Michigan U.S. state Oak Ridge Associated Universities West Virginia
Big Ten football picks: Reality check coming for Illinois
College football's first weekend produced stunners like Houston over Oklahoma — and some silly oversimplifications. ESPN deemed the Big Ten to have had "the best opening weekend" based on its 12-2 record. Hmmm … going 2-1 against the Power Five and losing at home to a MAC team constitutes achievement?...
-1 points by Chicago Tribune | Big Ten Conference Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities Association of American Universities Oak Ridge Associated Universities Committee on Institutional Cooperation Indiana Ohio Michigan
Raid targets millionaire on food stamps
Police are investigating potential theft as well as Medicaid and welfare fraud charges.       
225 points by USA Today | Bank Secrecy Act Banking Bank Cheque Geauga County Ohio Police Net income Loan
U of Illinois OKs six-year, $21 million contract for Smith
URBANA, Ill. (AP) - University of Illinois trustees have approved a contract with football coach Lovie Smith that will pay him at least $21 million over six years. They approved initial terms for Smith after he was hired in March that were backloaded to pay him $10 million in salary ...
-1 points by The Washington Times | Illinois Lovie Smith Money Chicago Bears English-language films Ohio The Final The Washington Times
The GOP's smear Ted Strickland effort is working but Rob Portman's campaign is no profile in courage: Brent Larkin
Sen. Rob Portman and his allies are smashing every Ohio campaign spending record imaginable. Before it's over, expect about $70 million to be spent on his behalf as he seeks re-election in Ohio, writes Brent Larkin. CLEVELAND -- Republicans knew all long the best way to beat Ted Strickland was to destroy his reputation.   So, early on, they set out to end the former Democratic governor's long career in public life by waging a campaign unlike anything Ohio has ever seen.   Way back in February 2015, I wrote of Republican Sen. Rob Portman's re-election strategy: "By the time Portman is done spending (insert a number here north of $25 million), even some Democrats will be convinced Strickland was the most notorious job-killer in Ohio history."   2015: Strickland's Senate candidacy an expression of Ohio Democrats' weakness: Brent Larkin Mission accomplished - almost.   And as for that $25 million, it's now nearly twice as much.   So no one should be even a bit surprised all that money was used to finance an efficient, calculated and very public political execution.   At times, it's been almost painful to watch. Every day, the television airways are flooded with ads suggesting Ohio lost so many jobs on Strickland's watch as governor that he almost singlehandedly wrecked the state. It's all an exaggeration, of course, albeit one largely within the boundaries of what now qualifies as fair political commentary.     Portman and his allies are smashing every Ohio campaign spending record imaginable. Before it's over, expect about $70 million to be spent on his behalf.   A huge portion of it is coming from some genuinely awful human beings, people like the Koch brothers and the folks who run the gun lobby.   June: Conservative group drops another $2.7M on anti-Ted Strickland TV ad But it's working.     Strickland's campaign is on life support. He's trailing Portman by high single digits. His fundraising in Ohio has been underwhelming for more than a year.   Read more: Jeremy Pelzer analysis of why Strickland is so behind in Senate race And not about to waste money on a Senate race they're unlikely to win, Washington Democrats are pulling essential advertising money out of Ohio and moving it to other states.   But perhaps the most telltale sign of all is that Charles and David Koch, the vile billionaire brothers determined to wreck the environment by wiping out any and all government regulation of their polluting industries, have reportedly closed their checkbook and moved on. Aug. 30: Koch brothers cancel $2.1M worth of Ohio Senate ads Yet before they left, the shadowy groups the Koch brothers fund had poured nearly $7 million into the smear Strickland effort.   If Portman wins, Charles and David Koch will demand his support on every single matter that impacts their evil empire.   We'll be watching.   Like Strickland, Portman is a genuinely decent guy. He's smart, works hard for and cares about Ohio.   But it's hard to shed the notion Portman left his conscience at home in this race. Watching him struggle to have it both ways -- supporting Donald Trump while running to the other end of the state whenever Trump visits Ohio -- is at times pathetic.   No one has done more to promote Portman's career in public service than the Bush family, notably former presidents George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush. Yet after all the two Bush presidents did -- and continue to do -- for him, Portman now supports for president a man who has regularly demeaned that family in the crudest terms imaginable.   Some things in life should be more important than winning an election.   Strickland's best remaining hope is for another crazed Trump comment that brings down dozens of Republicans now deemed safe -- preferably something the emotionally unstable candidate utters at one of those frenzied rallies teeming with white males who wake up each morning angry over their lot in life.   Far more likely is an Election Day verdict that, at age 75, Strickland ran one race too many.   Rob Portman, Ted Strickland get glowing health reports So, who's to blame for yet another monumental Democratic debacle in Ohio?   As one longtime political insider aptly put it, "The ship of fools is quite large."   At the top of any list would be those who lobbied for Strickland to run: Washington Democratic power brokers; Bill and Hillary Clinton; the Ohio Democratic Party; and - as always - the public-sector labor unions, in this case, most notably, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees.   With disaster looming, Democrats are doing what they usually do: marshaling their excuses.   "No one short of John Glenn or LeBron James could take $45 million of attack ads and be ahead," said Ohio Democratic Party Chairman David Pepper. "Is Ohio for sale? That's what this race is all about."   He's half right.   Ohio is for sale. But the race is also about the Democratic Party's inexplicable decision to ram an early Strickland endorsement down the throats of rank-and-file Democrats -- infuriating both young voters and Democrats offended by Strickland's lifelong opposition to common-sense gun laws.   Yes, Strickland crushed 31-year-old Cincinnati Councilman PG Sittenfeld in the party primary. But the former governor's record was low-hanging fruit for the Portman campaign. Attacking Sittenfeld would have proven more difficult, and riskier.   Instead of looking to the future, Democrats went with a candidate who would be the oldest true freshman ever elected to the U.S. Senate. In a year when voters are desperate for change, the people who control the state party went the wrong way.   Some things never change. Brent Larkin was The Plain Dealer's editorial director from 1991 until his retirement in 2009. To reach Brent Larkin: [email protected]
174 points by The Plain Dealer | George W. Bush Democratic Party George H. W. Bush Bill Clinton Ohio Republican Party President of the United States Bush family
University of Akron's Art Bomb Brigade to unveil its second mural at Chill
The Art Bomb Brigade, a community arts program run by the University of Akron's Myer's School of Art, will unveil its second mural at Chill, Akron's gourmet ice cream shop. AKRON, Ohio -- The University of Akron's Art Bomb Brigade is putting the finishing touches on an ultra contemporary mural at Chill, Akron's new gourmet ice cream shop. The work will be unveiled Sunday, Sept. 11, at 11 a.m. during the Akron Farm and Flea Market at 51 East Market and Maiden Lane in Akron. The market runs 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The event features music by local musicians ZACH and the Fourons. Local food, fare and craft vendors will also be available. The Chill mural is being painted by university alumni artists Rosa Maille, Matt Miller, David Pluck, Leah Prischak, Francisca Ugalde and Ryan Weiss. The artists are working with the illustrator and skateboarder, Jay Croft, an Akron native. Croft is a longtime zine creator, blogger, painter and designer, as well as the visual merchandiser for VANS "OFF THE WALL" shoes. "Art Bomb works to bring together Akronites, teachers, artist, and community organizations to create positive change in our city," said Art Bomb director and university associate professor of art education, Elisa Gargarella, in a news release. "Art Bomb serves as a model to the region for how public art can transform communities into more sustainable, more creative, more economically rich and more culturally engaged places to live and work." Art Bomb is a community arts program run by the university's Myers School of Art. The group was awarded a 2016 Knight Arts Challenge to impact the community through murals created by art students, university alumni and local artists. Art Bomb's first major mural was created at the Downtown Akron Laundromat on South Main Street this past summer.
4 points by The Plain Dealer | Art Visual arts Arts Music Ohio Local food University of Akron
Brecksville Dam demolition the focus of public hearing tonight in Peninsula (photos)
The public will receive its first look this evening at what the Cuyahoga River will look like after the Brecksville Dam is removed next year or the year after. PENINSULA, Ohio - The public will receive its first look this evening at what the Cuyahoga River will look like after the Brecksville Dam is removed next year or the year after. The open house will be from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Happy Days Lodge, 500 West Streetsboro Road (Ohio 303) just East of Peninsula. The presentation is sponsored by the Ohio EPA and the National Park Service. Conservationists and friends of the Cuyahoga River generally support the dam demolition plan and the environmental benefits the plan will bring to the water quality and wildlife habitat in the river. No organized opposition is expected. "We're excited," said Pam Barnes, a spokeswoman for the Cuyahoga Valley National Park. "This is really a good thing for the river." "This project is exactly what we need for the Cuyahoga," said Peter Bode, watershed coordinator for Cuyahoga River Restoration. "It is ridding a major barrier for our migratory species to spawn upriver ... and nothing but a positive for the ecology of the region." Any grumbling about the dam's removal likely will be limited to steelhead trout anglers who enjoy casting their lines into the base of the dam's spillway, where the game fish congregate, unable to proceed upstream. "That is the shooting-fish-in-a-barrel place to be," said Jane Goodman, Cuyahoga River Restoration's executive director. "But it's a small dam. Most people don't even know it's there. I don't expect anyone except the steelhead anglers to have any objections." The EPA and parks officials will present the results of an environmental assessment conducted on the eight-foot tall, 183-foot long dam which spans the river just north of the Station Road bridge trailhead along the Towpath Trail. The assessment identifies an ecological restoration strategy to improve water quality while preserving the Ohio and Erie Canal's cultural integrity as a National Historic Landmark. The EPA and national park officials have proposed completely removing the dam, thus restoring the river to its natural flow conditions. They plan to install a pump to supply as much as 13 million gallons of water a day to the adjacent canal. By removing the dam, state environmentalists would move a step closer to returning the Cuyahoga to a free-flowing river, leaving the 57-foot high Gorge Dam between Akron and Cuyahoga Falls as the only impediment from its source in Geauga County to its mouth at Lake Erie. Removing the Gorge Dam, however, could cost as much as $70 million.
73 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga River Ohio and Erie Canal Ohio Cuyahoga Valley National Park Lake Erie Greater Cleveland Cuyahoga County Ohio National Park Service
New Ohio schools Superintendent Paolo DeMaria must advocate for children: editorial
Ohio's new schools Superintendent Paolo DeMaria has a chance to show that he can stand up to political pressure, unlike some of the state's recent superintendents, and that he will be a committed advocate for our children, writes the editorial board. Ohio's new schools superintendent, Paolo DeMaria, might have a hard time filling the shoes of some of his predecessors -- not because they were so big, but because they were so small.  More on Ohio's new school chief This gives DeMaria an opportunity to show that his key concern is ensuring that Ohio's children get a top-notch education and that their parents and the public have a permanent seat at the table for any decisions. In particular, DeMaria needs to work hard to keep the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) insulated from political pressure. His predecessors did not achieve those goals. Richard Ross, who retired last year, was sandbagged by former school choice director David Hansen's deliberate omission of the failing grades of online charter schools. Hansen resigned from ODE soon after. He is the husband of Beth Hansen, Kasich's chief of staff and former presidential campaign manager.   Before that, schools Superintendent Stan Heffner handed in his retirement papers in 2012 after Ohio Inspector General Randall Meyer said he lobbied the state on behalf of an education company he had agreed to work for -- which shows he had little consideration for the needs of Ohio's children or its taxpayers.  DeMaria ought to set the bar higher for the Ohio superintendency than it has been for some time.  There are clear signs that DeMaria is willing to do the job -- especially given his crackdown on inadequate reporting by publicly funded charter schools in Ohio -- but to ensure that DeMaria has a clear field for reform, there needs to be a change in the governor's office as well. About our editorials Editorials express the view of the editorial board of cleveland.com and The Plain Dealer -- the senior leadership and editorial-writing staff. As is traditional, editorials are unsigned and intended to be seen as the voice of the news organization. * Talk about the topic of this editorial in the comments below. * Send a letter to the editor, which will be considered for print publication. * Email general questions or comments about the editorial board to Elizabeth Sullivan, opinion director for cleveland.com. // $('.floatingSeries').css({'font-family':'arial,helvetica,sans-serif','font-size':'14px','line-height':'20px','color':'#333333','width':'255px','margin':'10px','margin-right':'0px','float':'right','border-bottom-color':'#dadada','border-bottom-style':'solid','border-bottom-width':'1px','padding-bottom':'2px'});$('.floatingSeries h3').css({'text-transform':'uppercase','color':'#363636','font-size':'30px','line-height':'28px','padding-bottom':'7px','border-bottom-color':'#363636','border-bottom-style':'solid','border-bottom-width':'4px'}); $('.floatingSeries ul').css({'list-style-type':'none','list-style-position':'outside','list-style-image':'none','margin':'0px','padding':'0px'});$('.floatingSeries li').css({'font-family':'arial,helvetica,sans-serif','font-size':'14px','font-weight':'normal','color':'#333333','font-weight':'bold','line-height':'20px','border-top-width':'1px','border-top-style':'solid','border-top-color':'#cccccc','margin':'0px','margin-top':'6px','margin-bottom':'6px','padding':'0px','padding-top':'6px','padding-bottom':'4px','color':'#333333','text-decoration':'none'});$('.floatingSeries a:link').css('color','#333333');$('.floatingSeries h3').css('margin-bottom','2px'); // ]]> Gov. John Kasich must be more outspoken and explicit in showing his support for DeMaria in his fight with politically connected charter school interests. Admirably, DeMaria has resisted legislative efforts to defang House Bill 2, Ohio's tough new charter school reform law that requires improved ODE evaluations and oversight. That's critical, since some Republicans in the Ohio General Assembly already have blocked a new rule prompted by HB 2 that required charter school sponsors to prove to the state that they are complying with all of its rules - about 300 in all. Instead, lawmakers sent the rule to a rule-making committee to evaluate, a delaying tactic that could take months. The evaluations are supposed to be done by Oct. 15. DeMaria, in response, decided to take a random sample of 10 percent of each of the sponsors' schools to meet the requirement and complete the evaluations by the deadline. That was smart. But Kasich should have spoken up and told meddlesome legislators to follow the law. Speak up for charter school reform, Gov. Kasich ODE under DeMaria has also been fighting a legal battle to get student attendance records from ECOT, the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, an online school that has been criticized by the state for failing to show that its students have the required 920 hours of active learning in an academic year. DeMaria also has to make sure that the 19-member elected state board of education -- his immediate bosses -- and the public are in the loop.  That didn't happen under Ross, who engaged, with the help of some Mahoning County officials and others, in a top-secret state takeover of the underperforming Youngstown schools without the knowledge of either state school board members or the city. Ross' lack of full transparency poisoned politics on the board and tainted his reputation. DeMaria needs to learn from his predecessors' mistakes and make sure he is an honest advocate who sees his job as working on behalf of Ohio's children and being open and honest with the public. If he can achieve those goals, he could be one of the best superintendents that Ohio has had in some time. Have something to say about this topic? Use the comments to share your thoughts, and stay informed when readers reply to your comments by using the Notification Settings just below.
44 points by The Plain Dealer | Charter school Charter State Public school School Alternative education Ohio Education
Eyes on North Carolina as GOP-led board settles voting rules
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina's Board of Elections worked county by county Thursday to approve early-voting plans that were redrawn after a federal court voided much of the state's election law as discriminatory toward African-Americans.
-1 points by Arizona Daily Star | North Carolina Elections Abraham Lincoln Ohio Red states and blue states Maryland Maine Louisiana
Avon police sergeant granted limited driving privileges after drunken-driving arrest
A judge granted limited driving privileges to an Avon police sergeant arrested on a drunken-driving charge. AVON, Ohio -- A judge granted limited driving privileges to an Avon police sergeant arrested on a drunken-driving charge, according to court records.  Avon Lake Municipal Court Judge Darrel Bilancini on Wednesday granted Sgt. George Rupel's attorney's request for a stay on a driver's license suspension to allow him to attend work and doctors' appointments pending the outcome of the case, a court clerk said. The Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles automatically suspends the licenses of every person cited with drunken-driving charges in the state, the clerk said. Rupel, 37, of North Olmsted pleaded not guilty to charges of operating a vehicle under the influence of alcohol and driving outside of marked lanes. He is due back in court Sept. 20. An Ohio State Highway Patrol trooper pulled Ruple over at 2:17 a.m. Monday on Kinzel Road near Stoney Ridge Road in Avon. Ruple was driving left of the center road line, a state patrol sergeant told cleveland.com. Avon police Chief Richard Bosley said Thursday morning that Ruple had taken off from work since the incident and the chief had not received paperwork about Rupel's driving privileges from the court. Bosley did not know when Ruple would return to work. Ruple is a patrol supervisor and has been with the Avon Police Department for 12 years. He was an officer with the North Ridgeville Police Department for five years before that, Bosley said. Avon police will decide whether Bosley will face discipline once the case makes its way through court. "We want to make sure we have all the facts," Bosley said. Ruple and his attorney could not be reached for comment. If you wish to discuss or comment on this story, please visit our crime and courts comments section. Like Chanda Neely on Facebook. Follow me on Twitter: Follow @ChandaNeely // !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+'://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js';fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document, 'script', 'twitter-wjs'); // ]]>
32 points by The Plain Dealer | Westlake Ohio Sergeant Ohio State Highway Patrol North Ridgeville Ohio Lorain County Ohio North Olmsted Ohio Judge Avon Ohio
Greater Cleveland Volunteers: Opportunities for the week of September 7, 2016
September 18th - Party in the Parklands! Volunteer at an annual Shaker Lakes Hike and Run. 7:00-10:30 a.m. at the water station and 10:30-1:30 with arts/crafts, activities and food/beverage attendants. Contact Jan at 216-391-9500. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Greater Cleveland Volunteers enriches the community and individuals through volunteer services. We recruit individuals age 18 years+ to volunteer at over 100 nonprofit organizations throughout Cuyahoga County. We offer one-time, ongoing and short-term volunteer opportunities. Connect with us at greaterclevelandvolunteers.org, Facebook and Twitter @CLEvolunteers. We have volunteer coordinators available at 216-391-9500. Here are a few featured volunteer opportunities. Have an interest and don't see it? Call us and a volunteer coordinator will assist. One-time Event: Party in the Parklands! Volunteer at an annual Shaker Lakes Hike and Run on Sunday, September 18th. 7:00-10:30 a.m. at the water station and 10:30-1:30 with arts/crafts, activities and food/beverage attendants. Contact Jan at 216-391-9500 x 124 or [email protected] On-Going Literacy Tutoring: We have several partner agencies that seek before, during and after school tutoring needs. Tell us what school district is close and when you are available. 216-391-9500 [email protected] Hospice of the Western Reserve needs a volunteer to help out at its resale shop on Mayfield Road. A retail background would be great, but is not necessary.  The volunteer would be trained to run the cash register and  assist the full-time manager. An "employee" discount is given to all who volunteer in the shop.  Shop hours are Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and closed on Sundays. The shop sells furniture, household goods, jewelry, collectibles, some clothing, purses, etc. Call Sue at 216-391-9500 x 120 for more information Lunchtime Mentoring: If you have a lunch hour available once a week, during the school year, consider serving as a positive role model to a student in the 4th grade. Contact Carol at 216-391-9500 x 125 or [email protected] Theatre Usher: The Maltz Performing Arts Center (MPAC) in University Circle is a wonderful new venue for music, lectures and cultural enrichment in Cleveland. If you have an interest in adding this to your volunteer efforts contact Cecille at 216-391-9500 x 122 or [email protected] Senior Living Facility: Assist transporting resident to/from their outings. Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays 10:30 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Training and supervision is provided. Contact Lynette at 216-391-9500 x 123 or [email protected]
2 points by The Plain Dealer | Cuyahoga County Ohio Greater Cleveland Cleveland Week-day names Cuyahoga River Connecticut Western Reserve Lunch High school
10 Cuyahoga County school districts have new taxes on the November ballot: Here's the list
Four districts want more money for expenses. Another two want the OK to sell bonds that would raise money for school construction and renovation. The remaining four propose combination issues that would allow a district to sell bonds and levy a tax to pay for them while also allowing an additional tax for maintenance and further improvements.
13 points by The Plain Dealer | High school Tax Middle school Levy Taxation in the United States Finance Cuyahoga County Ohio College
Ohio State's walk-on kicker turns heads in first ever game
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) - Ohio State coach Urban Meyer doesn't waste a lot of time thinking about kickers, but even he had to admit that Tyler Durbin is a pretty cool story. A walk-on kicker who played in his first football game at any level last Saturday, Durbin got the ...
-1 points by The Washington Times | American football American football positions Columbus Ohio Ohio State Buckeyes Urban Meyer Association football Canadian football Ohio State University