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Hospitals inflate price of some services by 20 times or more, study says
Stephen FellerBALTIMORE, Sept. 9 (UPI) -- Huge price markups at hospitals, with some as large as 20 times the actual cost, are based on increasing revenue simply because they can, researchers say.
265 points by UPI | Johns Hopkins University Patient Hospital Public health Health care Johns Hopkins United Press International Johns Hopkins Hospital
Bel Air finance director honored for town employee health and wellness programs
Bel Air Finance Director Lisa Moody is in charge of looking after the Town of Bel Air's budget, but she has taken on an additional effort in the past decade, looking after the health and well being of her co-workers. She was honored for that effort Tuesday evening with the Silver HEAL Leader award...
-1 points by Baltimore Sun | Health Nutrition Health care Municipality Personal life Medicine City Public health
Health perks of pet ownership
Living with an animal can help people mentally, physically and emotionally.        
136 points by Detroit Free Press | Dog Health care Health Health economics Pet Medicine Dog park Public health
Phys Ed: What’s the Value of Exercise? $2,500
An analysis of more than 26,000 men and women found that a little exercise can result in big savings on medical bills.
9644 points by The New York Times | Health care Medicine Health economics Physical exercise Obesity Public health Exercise Epidemiology
Global challenge: How health care works around the world
In a doctor's waiting room in South London sit three people of varying ages and ethnicities, waiting among a sea of empty green plastic chairs.
-1 points by CNN | Medicine Health economics Health care Managed care Public health Health Healthcare Health care provider
Hepatitis A cases spike in metro Detroit
State health officials are warning Metro Detroiters to take precautions after a spike in hepatitis A cases.        
-1 points by Detroit Free Press | Hepatitis A Vaccine Vaccination Hepatitis Liver Hepatitis C Hepatitis B Public health
How the GOP health bill could affect health benefits, including addiction
Why some say you should care if your plan covers "essential health benefits" at any age.       
-1 points by USA Today | Health insurance Health care Health economics Medicare Healthcare reform Drug addiction Medicaid Public health
Medicaid cuts would force tough choices
Proposed budget reductions in worry Michigan patients, caregivers        
-2 points by The Detroit News | Health care Medicaid Medicine Health Health economics Health insurance Public health Health science
Dropping Obamacare's 'essential' benefits impacts more than mammograms
Why some say you should care if your plan covers "essential health benefits" at any age.       
-1 points by USA Today | Health insurance Health care Health economics Medicare Healthcare reform Drug addiction Medicaid Public health
Career pivot is ultimate test of self-reinvention
Like many people at various points in their careers - even the most successful - he had asked the question: Can I reinvent myself?
3 points by The Denver Post | Johns Hopkins University Johns Hopkins Public health Epidemiology Johns Hopkins Hospital Johns Hopkins School of Nursing
HIV cases down in Maryland, U.S.
HIV infections in the United States have fallen for several years, and few places have seen a bigger drop than Maryland, according to new estimates from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Cases in the state dropped an average of 7.5 percent per year from 2008 to 2014. That was...
-2 points by Baltimore Sun | Infectious disease Public health Hypodermic needle Infection Epidemiology HIV Prevention Drug injection
House votes to undo Obama rule protecting Planned Parenthood grants
The Republican-led House voted 230-188 largely along party lines to dismiss the rule under the Congressional Review Act.       
14 points by USA Today | Health care Health Birth control Family planning Public health Abortion Barack Obama United States Congress
WHO declares end to yellow fever outbreak in Congo, Angola
DAKAR, Senegal — The World Health Organization has declared an end to the yellow fever outbreak that killed about 400 people in Congo and Angola, calling it "one of the largest and most challenging" in recent years.The outbreak, first detected in Angola in late 2015, caused 965 confirmed cases and thousands of suspected cases in both countries, the WHO said in a statement Tuesday. Neither country has reported a new confirmed case in the past six months.Angola in late December declared an end to its outbreak, and Congo made its announcement Tuesday.
-2 points by Boston Herald | Malaria Influenza World Health Organization Vaccine Smallpox Public health Vaccination Yellow fever
Letter: For universal care
For universal careI am very grateful to the taxpayers of the Merrimack Valley School District.A defect in my heart was repaired successfully and I was able to afford the diagnosis, surgery and the overnight in the hospital. Without good insurance our retirement savings would be gone. Without the sur...
1 points by Concord Monitor | Medicine Universal health care Pension Denmark Health care Health Iceland Public health
Study: Detroit unhealthiest big city in America
WalletHub’s data team compared 150 of the most populated U.S. cities across 34 key indicators of good health        
-2 points by The Detroit News | Health care Health Medicine Nutrition Public health Health science Health economics Health insurance
Snyder plans renewed push for stricter lead water limit
Rick Snyder plans a renewed push on his plan 10 months ago to give Michigan the nation’s toughest water quality standard        
-2 points by The Detroit News | Water Public health Lead poisoning Drinking water Occupational safety and health Water supply network Safe Drinking Water Act Water crisis
Galveston gets $600k to up its fight against Zika

2 points by The Houston Chronicle | Local government Public health Mosquito control Insect repellent Remainder Epidemiology Mosquito Galveston Texas
Here's what scientists say is the perfect workweek
A study found the work limit for a healthy life should come in at just under 40 hours a week.         
-2 points by Arizona Republic | Health Medicine Health care Public health Population health Nutrition Working time Human
Here's what scientists say is the perfect work week
A study shows that the work limit for a healthy life should come in at just under 40 hours a week instead of the 48 hours set international...       
-2 points by USA Today | Health Medicine Health care Public health Population health Nutrition Working time Human
People vaccinated during Hepatitis A outbreak need 2nd shot
HONOLULU (AP) - Hawaii's Department of Health is reminding people who were vaccinated during last year's hepatitis A outbreak that it's time for a second dose. The department said Tuesday that data shows there were about 90,000 hepatitis A vaccines administered in Hawaii between July and November. In August, state ...
-2 points by The Washington Times | Vaccine Vaccination Hepatitis A Immune system Public health Smallpox Inoculation
U.S. legislation boosted access to autism services, with no added cost to families
HealthDay News Use of healthcare services by children with autism increased modestly after a U.S. law requiring equal insurance benefits for mental and physical health.
113 points by UPI | Health care Public health Medicine Health economics Health Mental disorder Health insurance Autism spectrum
Senate panel introduces new school vaccine opt-out bill
BOISE, Idaho (AP) - An Idaho Senate panel has introduced legislation that would allow parents simply to write a letter excusing their children from vaccines rather than fill out a governmental form. The Times-News (http://bit.ly/2koAfe3 ) reports that the state currently allows parents enrolling their children into school to opt ...
-2 points by The Washington Times | Immune system Washington D.C. Senate Public health United States Congress State Boise Idaho United States Senate
Baton Rouge to begin demolishing flood-damaged homes
BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) - Baton Rouge Officials are preparing to tear down abandoned homes that were damaged from flooding in August. The city-parish said in a news release Monday that officials will start to condemn the abandoned units, with demolition expected to begin on some houses in the coming ...
-2 points by The Washington Times | Sun Myung Moon Occupational safety and health Public health The Washington Times English-language films Baton Rouge Louisiana Office Health
Study shows effects of stress on cortisol patterns in police
Amy WallaceFeb. 6 (UPI) -- A new study from the University at Buffalo has linked stress and cortisol levels in police to an increased risk of heart disease.
1 points by UPI | United Press International Police Constable Cortisol Stress Health Epidemiology Public health
Obamacare enrollment up in Maryland, despite uncertainty
Amid uncertainty about the future of the national health care law, record numbers of Marylanders signed up for coverage this year, according to figures released by the state Wednesday.In what could be the final enrollment period of the Affordable Care Act, nearly 432,000 Maryland residents signed...
-2 points by Baltimore Sun | Health care Barack Obama Health economics Health insurance Democratic Party Public health Republican Party President of the United States
Vaccination funding may be cut if Obamacare ends, public health experts warn
Many worry that up to 1 million Illinois consumers could lose their health insurance if Obamacare is repealed. But Chicago Department of Public Health leaders aren't just worried about that part of the Affordable Care Act being repealed. They're also concerned about the possible loss of funds used...
-2 points by Baltimore Sun | Health economics Health care Public health Medicine Vaccine Health Vaccination Healthcare
Zika no longer a world public health emergency: WHO
Health agency says mosquito-borne still poses a significant public health challenge requiring intense action.
57 points by Al Jazeera English | World Health Organization AIDS Sexual intercourse Human sexual behavior Chlamydia infection Pregnancy Infection Public health
WHO: Zika no longer a world health emergency
Nearly 30 countries have reported birth defects linked to the virus.       
100 points by USA Today | United States World Health Organization Aedes Vaccination Aedes aegypti Public health Miami Mosquito
Mom sues teen son for secretly transitioning into woman
A Minnesota woman filed a lawsuit against her 17-year-old child, the county and a handful of other agencies after she claimed that her child was receiving transgender services without her permission. Anmarie Calgaro says St. Louis County, St. Louis County Public Health and Human Services Director, Fairview Health Services, Park Nicollet Health Services, St. Louis...
736 points by New York Post | Medicine Health care Health Court order Family law Child custody Public health Law
Change Direction discussion highlights connection between mental health issues and addiction
Twenty years ago, when someone seeking mental health treatment in New Hampshire went to get help, the person doing intake often asked whether they were self-medicating with drugs or alcohol.If the answer was yes, “the intake person would say, ‘get yourself sober, then come back for treatment,’ ” Riv...
33 points by Concord Monitor | Mental disorder Mental health Drug addiction Health care New Hampshire Public health Health Massachusetts
Taking care of workers health ‘corporate responsibility’, Dutch envoy tells Bangladesh RMG industry
The Netherlands ambassador in Bangladesh has called upon the garment factory owners to take care of their workers health, even in the interest of  “business profit”.
327 points by | Reproductive health Health Medicine Women's health Human Sexual health Public health Health care
Hopkins school of public health gets $95 million to study environmental effects on children's health
The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health will receive $95 million in federal funding over seven years to analyze data collected from 50,000 children across the country and answer questions about environmental factors that influence their health from conception through early childhood....
-1 points by Baltimore Sun | Michael Bloomberg Public health New York City Johns Hopkins University Mayor of New York City Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Childhood Health
Want a Zika Test? It's Not Easy
Even people like Palmeroni-Lavis, who have compelling reasons to be tested for a virus known to cause devastating brain defects in the fetus, cannot walk into a local health department and get tested on-demand. [...] public health officials in Florida say they face a backlog of tests for pregnant women, some of whom may be waiting to make decisions about whether to have abortions if they test positive. The restrictions are aimed at preventing an onslaught of requests for Zika tests that could clog the system and prevent public health officials from identifying new cases quickly. Public health experts say the restrictions are necessary to ensure that people most at risk have access to Zika testing. Laboratories and public health agencies say they are inundated with requests for tests, but declined to provide specifics. There are limitations to the best available tests, said Dr. Jay K. Varma, deputy commissioner for disease control at New York City's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
-1 points by The Houston Chronicle | World Health Organization Public health Pregnancy Medicine Infectious disease New York City Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Fertility
What's really in the meat you eat?
Although you might pay attention to what kind of meat you buy at the grocery store -- organic, grass-fed, cage-free -- chances are, you aren't as informed about the meat that's on the menu at your favorite fast food joint.
6001 points by CNN | Fast food Antibiotic resistance Meat Antibiotic Fast casual restaurant Antibiotics Public health Medicine
Healthy Harford Day coming to Bel Air this Saturday
Healthy Harford Day, which continues to grow every year, is returning to promote all things wellness in downtown Bel Air on Saturday. More than 100 health-related vendors will take over 119 South Hays Street, across from the Bel Air Farmers' Market, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. People should come "dressed...
-1 points by Baltimore Sun | Health education Health Public health Health care Epidemiology Population health Medicine Nutrition
Want a Zika Test? It’s Not Easy
Men and women who want to be sure they are Zika free before trying to conceive are being told they aren’t eligible for Zika testing.
795 points by The New York Times | Health care World Health Organization Public health Pregnancy Health Medicine Antibody
HHS says uninsured rate at all-time low, calls Obamacare an 'undeniable' success
The nation's uninsured rate dropped to its lowest point on record — 8.6 percent — in the first quarter of the year, the Obama administration said Wednesday, pointing to the numbers as proof that Obamacare is an "undeniable" success despite a string of lousy developments for the law. Health and ...
89 points by The Washington Times | Health care Barack Obama Health insurance Health Medicine Public health Massachusetts Health science
CDC deploys new rapid response teams to fight Zika
The groups include dentists, doctors, veterinarians and entomologists.       
-1 points by USA Today | Epidemiology Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Health care Medicine Public health Outbreak Health economics Health
Thai authorities downplay Zika risk, worried by tourism impact
BANGKOK (Reuters) - Health and city officials in Thailand downplayed risks from rising infections from the mosquito-borne Zika virus, which is linked to serious birth defects, and expressed concern that disclosing information would damage its tourism industry.
141 points by Reuters | Southeast Asia Bangkok Public health World Health Organization Thailand Epidemiology Infectious disease Infection
Connecticut officials plan forum on lead screening of kids
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) - Connecticut lawmakers and health officials have scheduled a public forum on the state's efforts to prevent children from being exposed to lead. The Legislature's Children's Committee and Public Health Committee will hold the forum Monday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Legislative Office Building ...
-1 points by The Washington Times | Health care Massachusetts Connecticut European Union Hartford Connecticut Public health Lead poisoning Legislatures
Felling suicidal? There's help — there's hope. Read this
If you are concerned about someone dear to you, you aren't alone.         
6806 points by Arizona Republic | Suicide World Health Organization Public health Universal health care Meaning of life American Foundation for Suicide Prevention Suicide prevention Death
Texas’ maternal death rates top most industrialized countries
Women in the Texas are dying of pregnancy-related ailments at a higher rate than the rest of the country and even most other industrialized ...       
2067 points by USA Today | Abortion Childbirth Obstetrics Health care Pregnancy World Health Organization Medicine Public health
Texas struggles with rising maternal death rate
Women in the Texas are dying of pregnancy-related ailments at a higher rate than the rest of the country and even most other industrialized ...       
2067 points by USA Today | Abortion Childbirth Obstetrics Health care Pregnancy World Health Organization Medicine Public health
Charles D. Flagle, Hopkins professor emeritus, dies
Charles D. Flagle, a Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health professor emeritus, died of pneumonia Sunday at Blakehurst Retirement Community in Towson. The former Ruxton resident was 97. "Dr. Flagle was among the founders of the field of health services research," said Karen Kruse Thomas,...
-1 points by Baltimore Sun | Health economics Johns Hopkins University Johns Hopkins Hospital Medicine Public health Baltimore Healthcare Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Former Houston man settles listeria lawsuit against Blue Bell
A former Houston resident has settled a federal lawsuit against Blue Bell Creameries that underscored gaps in the public health system's ability to detect the origin of foodborne illnesses. Phil Shockley, 33, claimed that his case of listeria poisoning resulted from eating tainted ice cream in 2013 and was part of an outbreak that health officials now know went on for years, sickening 10 people across four states, including three who died. The hospital that treated Shockley was never publicly identified, and records related to his case – if they exist – haven't been released because of state privacy laws that allow public health officials sole discretion over which outbreaks to disclose and how.
2 points by The Houston Chronicle | Epidemiology Blue Bell Creameries Public health Health Brenham Texas Health care Washington County Texas Assisted living
World Suicide Prevention Day sends message of hope
If you are concerned about someone dear to you who is at risk of taking their own life, you aren't alone.       
-1 points by USA Today | Suicide World Health Organization Suicide prevention Crisis hotline Public health Universal health care Meaning of life