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Let doctoral candidates teach science to kids: Column
Mediocre U.S. test scores would rise if we deployed hard-science grad students to elementary schools.         
682 points by Arizona Republic | School Academic degree Doctorate Educational stages Education School types Elementary school Postgraduate education
Donald Trump Releases Education Proposal, Promoting School Choice
Mr. Trump on Thursday promised to direct $20 billion in federal grants for poor children to attend a school of their family’s choice.
3013 points by The New York Times | Charter school Iraq War Teacher Donald Trump Education School types Magnet school Education in the United States
State school board approves Fayette Co. consolidation plan
CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) - The West Virginia Board of Education has approved a consolidation plan for Fayette County public schools. Local news organizations report that the Comprehensive Education Facilities Plan, which was approved Wednesday, seeks to reconfigure, redistrict and renovate several county schools. The plan would drop the number of ...
-1 points by The Washington Times | High school West Virginia School types Fayette County West Virginia Grammar school Primary school School Primary education
Police in West Texas town of Alpine search for 'active shooter'
Police in the West Texas town of Alpine say there's an "active shooter" situation and schools have been locked down amid the search for a suspect. Police dispatcher Scarlet Eldred had no immediate information on whether anyone was hurt in the unspecified incident shortly before 9 a.m. Thursday....
-1 points by Chicago Tribune | High school Texas College School district Grammar school School types Vocational school Middle school
Police in West Texas town of Alpine search for 'shooter'
Police in the West Texas town of Alpine say there's an "active shooter" situation and schools have been locked down amid the search for a suspect. Police dispatcher Scarlet Eldred had no immediate information on ...
-1 points by Las Vegas Sun | High school Texas School district College Grammar school School types Middle school Vocational school
U.S. Department of Education awards grant to Renaissance Academy
Federal education officials will send more than $350,000 to Baltimore's Renaissance Academy High School to help students and staff recover from the stabbing death of a student in a classroom last year.The U.S. Department of Education said the Project School Emergency Response to Violence grant...
-1 points by Baltimore Sun | High school Education Public school Secondary school School types Hong Kong Baltimore Gymnasium
Philly schools Superintendent Hite optimistic about new school year
When 130,000 students report to Philadelphia public-school classrooms Wednesday, they will be greeted by a novelty in city schools: brand-new textbooks.
475 points by The Philadelphia Inquirer | High school Academic term Philadelphia School types Contract School Education Teacher
A nontraditional school opens in Kensington
The Rev. Michael V. Marrone, a former Catholic high school teacher, dreamed of opening a school for students who struggled in traditional classrooms and were behind in reading and math.
602 points by The Philadelphia Inquirer | High school Teacher School types Public school Private school Education Independent school School
After hunger strike, Dyett reopens as arts-focused neighborhood high school
Freshmen walking through the doors of Walter H. Dyett High School for the Arts on the South Side experienced feelings similar to those of new high school students everywhere, a mix of first-day jitters and bashful excitement. But for the Washington Park and Bronzeville neighborhoods, the first...
-1 points by Chicago Tribune | High school College Education Grammar school School types Vocational school Nat King Cole Middle school
Trenton schools to dismiss early due to heat, humidity
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) - Trenton's public school district says staff and students will be dismissed early every day this week due to expected high temperatures and humidity. The district announced that students in elementary schools and the Stokes Early Childhood Center will dismiss at 1:00 p.m. on Wednesday, Thursday and ...
-1 points by The Washington Times | High school School types Middle school Secondary school College Grammar school
Suit: $12M for nine struggling schools in New York
Parents and advocates are suing to force state officials to cough up more than $12.4 million in extra funding for nine struggling schools.
7 points by Daily News | High school New York City College Secondary school School State School types Education
Bells ring as summer ends for 130K Philadelphia public school students
Ringing giant bells and declaring optimism, School Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. and Mayor Kenney formally opened the 2016-17 school year for 130,000 Philadelphia students Wednesday.
-1 points by The Philadelphia Inquirer | High school Education College School district Secondary school School School types Superintendent
Unknown substance causes lockdown at Las Vegas junior high school
A Las Vegas junior high school is on lockdown Tuesday afternoon while a hazardous materials team investigates an unknown substance found in the school’s gymnasium, police said.
97 points by Las Vegas Review-Journal | High school College Dangerous goods Middle school School types
Hogan blasts bill that would limit education reforms
Gov. Larry Hogan on Friday blasted an education reform bill that's moving through the General Assembly, calling it "misguided and horrible."Hogan said the bill — known as the "Protect Our Schools Act" — would thwart "an exciting opportunity to move beyond outdated practices" for reforming schools....
-1 points by Baltimore Sun | Public school United States Congress United States Private school High school Federal government of the United States United States Constitution School types
Is Kenney's community schools initiative making a difference in Philly?

-1 points by The Philadelphia Inquirer | High school School types College Middle school
Traffic pollution poses invisible health risk for dozens of Denver schools
A new online mapping tool, part of a joint investigative project by two nonprofit news organizations, the Center for Public Integrity and Reveal, puts the issue in stark relief. Residents across Colorado and the nation can easily check which schools fall into red zones where traffic volume, and the accompanying air pollution, is worst, and orange zones where traffic volume is lower, but still potentially problematic for kids and staff who may spend long hours at their schools.
-1 points by The Denver Post | Charter school High school School types Charter Education Colorado Interstate Highway System Education in the United States
Here's a look at 3 Detoit schools superintendent finalists
The finalists will undergo interviews with the Detroit board of education in the coming weeks.        
-2 points by Detroit Free Press | High school Detroit College School district School types Detroit Public Schools Education in the United States School
Redistricting recommended as Howard County schools pass capacity
Overcrowding in Howard County public schools has school officials contemplating another round of redistricting, while parents worry about the county's growing student population. According to the school system's 2016 feasibility study, 15 of the county's 76 schools are currently overcapacity, falling...
-2 points by Baltimore Sun | High school Middle school College Elementary school School types Educational stages Secondary school School terminology
Struggles of new East Baltimore school show challenges of integration
On the day that the Henderson-Hopkins school opened its doors to let children in, Crystal Jordan marveled at its light-filled rooms, curving stairs and interior play areas.She couldn't believe her family's good fortune. In a city with so many struggling schools, her fifth-grade daughter was entering...
-1 points by Baltimore Sun | High school Johns Hopkins University Johns Hopkins Hospital Secondary school School types Baltimore Johns Hopkins Independent school
Bill curbing suspensions, expulsions of youngest Maryland students nears final approval
Shirl Struck says her son, Noah, was getting suspended so often for acting out at Baltimore's Patterson Park Public Charter School that she had to quit her job.Noah is 6. He has autism."It didn't seem to me that suspension should ever be an option for them," the 49-year-old nurse said. "I mean,...
-1 points by Baltimore Sun | Maryland High school Kindergarten Charter school Public school School types United States Senate State school
Hogan pledges veto of bill that would limit Maryland school reforms
Gov. Larry Hogan is pledging to veto a bill moving quickly through the General Assembly that would prevent Maryland from enacting controversial reforms for struggling schools.The bill would prevent the state from creating a new district to govern the lowest-performing schools. It would also prohibit...
-1 points by Baltimore Sun | High school School types Public school United States Congress Teacher College Legislature United States
Hogan visits Montgomery County school with U.S. Education Secretary DeVos
Gov. Larry Hogan popped into a Montgomery County elementary school Thursday morning to read some Dr. Seuss. He shared the job with one of the Trump administration's most divisive figures: Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.The Republican governor and DeVos greeted second graders from Carderock Springs...
-1 points by Baltimore Sun | Barack Obama Public school Charter school School types Independent school High school Private school Michael E. Busch
With few students in an aging building, a Camden school is closing
District officials say declining enrollment and a crumbling building led to decision to close Sumner Elementary School.
-1 points by The Philadelphia Inquirer | High school Education Public school School types Primary school College Grammar school Primary education
Hogan steps back from harsh comments on Montgomery’s handling of alleged rape
The governor and U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos read to students at a Bethesda school Thursday morning.
-1 points by The Washington Post | High school School types Public school Middle school United States Senate School voucher College Private school
NYC Schools Chancellor ready to work with Betsy DeVos
Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña urged Trump's new Education Secretary Betsy DeVos not to cut funding for the city's public schools.
12 points by Daily News | Teacher High school Education Federal government of the United States School College Public school School types
CCSD Turnaround Zone offers ‘approach on steroids’ for lifting low-performing schools
Clark County School District officials argue that schools exit the Turnaround Zone in better standing than they entered. Yet nine of 13 schools that have exited still fall below state averages, either in math and reading proficiency levels or in composite ACT scores.
1 points by Las Vegas Review-Journal | High school Middle school College Educational stages Elementary school School types Secondary school Three-tier education
Catholic diocese announces plans for North Hills elementary schools
The Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh announced the final plans for parish schools in the North Hills that will consolidate in time for next school year. 
165 points by Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | Primary school Primary education School types Mary Catholic school Education Educational stages Elementary school
SRC approves expansion for charter to serve immigrant students

-2 points by The Philadelphia Inquirer | High school Education College School Primary education School types Poverty Teacher
The CU South Denver gift that keeps on giving in Douglas County
CU South Denver was gifted to the university more than 2 years ago. The 151,000-square-foot former museum is continuing to add education programs for people of all ages.
8 points by The Denver Post | School types 2015 Douglas County Colorado High school School terminology 2016 Charles R. Schwab Education
Would 8:30 a.m. start time help students do better?
Essential Education: Restorative justice for parents Feb. 15, 2017, 4:02 p.m. Welcome to Essential Education, our daily look at education in California and beyond. Here's the latest: L.A. Unified is looking at a way to smooth conflict between parents and schools. U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy...
2 points by Los Angeles Times | High school Charter school Education United States College Charter School School types
Polaneczky: A parent's school choice is nobody else's business
Why the hate toward parents trying to get their kids into the best public schools they can?
-2 points by The Philadelphia Inquirer | High school Secondary school Education Education in the United States School types Independent school College School
DeVos pledges support for magnet schools
Todd Mann, executive director of the Magnet Schools of America group, urged DeVos to commit to increasing school funds        
-2 points by The Detroit News | School voucher Private school Charter school Teacher Education Education in the United States School School types
In her first public speech, DeVos focuses on magnet schools' attractions
Essential Education: Restorative justice for parents Feb. 15, 2017, 4:02 p.m. Welcome to Essential Education, our daily look at education in California and beyond. Here's the latest: L.A. Unified is looking at a way to smooth conflict between parents and schools. U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy...
532 points by Los Angeles Times | Charter school Magnet school High school School types Public school Education in the United States Education Private school
Snyder proposes cut for private, homeschooled students
Snyder’s plan would cap yearly spending on “shared-time” programs at $60 million, down from $115 million this year        
-2 points by The Detroit News | High school Independent school School types Private school Public school Teacher Education Proposals
Teachers union: Detroit students need more sanctuary schools
At Western International High School — on the city's southwest side — the big topic is immigration.        
94 points by Detroit Free Press | High school School types Detroit Public Schools Detroit Education
Principal, DFT: Detroit needs sanctuary schools
At Western International High School — on the city's southwest side — the big topic is immigration.        
94 points by Detroit Free Press | High school Education School types Detroit Detroit Public Schools College Public school Grammar school
Urban Community School's miracle worker, Sister Maureen Doyle retiring after 34 years
Serving children from 3 years old through eighth grade, the school proves that with enough support, even children from the poorest homes can thrive. CLEVELAND, Ohio - As Sister Maureen Doyle contemplated her upcoming retirement in May from Urban Community School, the Near West Side school she has directed for more than three decades, a piece of wisdom about nurturing children came to her. Give your children roots and give them wings, the adage goes. "Roots to know where home is, and wings to fly off and practice what has been taught them." "I feel as though my own wings are fully developed," Sister Maureen said, "and there are other things I can do now. I don't know what that is yet, but there's still something out there." Parents, students and graduates of Urban would certainly agree that Sister Maureen's wings are wide and full. When they describe her profound influence on their lives, and the many ways, big and small, that she and the school have helped them, the image that comes to mind is of a guardian angel in human form. That's fitting, since Urban Community School is a kind of secular miracle. Serving children from 3 years old through eighth grade, the school proves that with enough support, even children from the poorest homes can thrive, with 90 percent going on to graduate from high school. Not all of them succeed, though, demonstrating how hard it can be for a child to overcome the gravitational pull of poverty. Naturally, the school's heart and soul would be a nun with wings. "Without Urban and Sister Maureen, I probably would be an alcoholic, and probably would never have gone to college," said Bob Duda, who graduated from Urban in 1991. Duda was the youngest of eight children in a family that struggled with poverty and the turmoil brought on by their father's alcoholism. All of the kids went to Urban, where Duda found the roots he needed. He was the first in his family to graduate from college. But, he said, "Some of my siblings still struggle and continue that poverty cycle." He remembered how the sisters looked out for him, letting him stay late after school just to talk, or inviting him to the convent to have dinner. "At home, we never had those family meals where you all sat around a table together," Duda said. "I was always jealous of kids who had that." Duda did not realize until many years later that he was not the only student who didn't have that kind of family, or got that kind of attention from the nuns. Everyone did, including his brothers and sisters. "I thought I was the only one," he said. "Sister Maureen and the other sisters and teachers made you feel that special." A vision of diversity, affordability The Ursuline Sisters of Cleveland started Urban Community School in 1968, after the closing of St. Patrick and St. Malachi elementary schools in the late 1960s. The sisters wanted their school to be diverse, to reflect the neighborhood, to be affordable for families living in economic distress, and to give students individualized attention - fairly radical concepts in Catholic schools at the time. Their vision led to a school that today has 550 students: 35 percent Hispanic; 30 percent Caucasian; 20 percent African American; and 15 percent other ethnicities, including a growing refugee population. All students come from the neighborhood, and while 78 percent of families live at or below the poverty line, the school also offers places to a smaller group of students whose families are of greater means. "And their families are helpful to the school," Sister Maureen said. "They volunteer, they coach. And the diversity's there in the classroom." Tuition is calculated on a sliding scale according to families' financial needs, with $110 a year the average. Full tuition is $7,400, but at present no one pays that. Tuition covers 3 percent of the school's $4.9 million annual budget. An Early Childhood Expansion grant and vouchers from the Cleveland Scholarship Program provide about $2 million, and the Ursuline nuns who work at the school donate back nearly 40 percent of their salaries. Community support adds $1.6 million, in addition to income from the school's endowment fund. Urban still offers the individualized attention its founders originated, allowing students to progress at their own pace through mixed-grade levels. But though faith-based education is still part of the curriculum, with students required to attend either Catholic or Christian classes, Urban is not officially a Catholic school. It is an ecumenical, independent school in the Catholic tradition, Sister Maureen said, run by a board of directors and sponsored by the Ursuline Sisters. Sister Maureen has been there for 34 of the school's nearly 50 years, 30 of them as the director. That's not including the year she volunteered at the school, when she was a 19-year-old Ursuline novice and was startled by her first glimpse of the "cold, dank and dreary" facilities. Her time there as a novice helped her realize her vocation: serving disadvantaged children through education. She had seen, up close, that education is the way to get out of poverty, and she wanted to provide it. She's now 66, and in her years as teacher and director she has helped transform lives while overseeing a transformation of Urban that the school's founders - not to mention that 19-year-old novice - might well consider miraculous. A record of expanding dreams, high achievement A large part of the transformation is concrete and visible. When Sister Maureen arrived as a teacher in 1983, Urban had 380 students and a long waiting list. It operated out of two old Catholic school buildings on the West 25th Street corridor, St. Malachi at one end and St. Wendelin at the other, neither of them offering amenities such as a gymnasium. A strategic planning process in 1993 - the school's first formal plan - launched the effort to grow and expand, and kick-started a fundraising drive to pay for a new building and to give Urban an endowment fund. In 2005, the spectacular new $12 million building opened, on a large parcel of donated land at Lorain Avenue and West 49th Street. In 2011, a $5 million donation allowed for the construction of a connected, dedicated middle school, which opened in 2014. Pledges to the endowment required by the strategic plan have reached $17 million. But Sister Maureen does not consider those her most meaningful accomplishments. "A lot of people would say, 'She built the building.' But from my perspective, what gives me the most satisfaction is being with graduates of the school," she said. "They come back, a lot of them, and they talk about why they have been successful, and they attribute a lot of that to what they got at Urban Community School. They speak with pride about their experience here." That success includes the high school graduation rate once students leave Urban: 90 percent graduate from high school within four years, and the school estimates that 65 percent then begin college. By contrast, 66 percent of students in the Cleveland Metropolitan School District graduated from high school in 2014, the most recent statistic available. The school report cards released by the Ohio Department of Education in January 2016 showed that just 39.3 percent of the CMSD class of 2012 enrolled in college within two years. Numbers like that get Sister Maureen to thinking: How and where did Urban help the students who, despite poverty and the other risks of inner-city life, went on to wonderful high schools and extraordinary colleges? And what about the children who don't make it, even with all that Urban offers them? She has sat with grieving mothers who have lost sons to gangs, and the school has helped pay for the funerals of former students killed at the hands of violence. "Our kids are targets right here in this neighborhood," she said. "We have kids whose parents are incarcerated and kids who are in jail themselves." Why do some succeed and others fall through the cracks? Because sometimes poverty wins. "You do everything," said Tom Gill, the school's associate director. "You hire the right teachers. You have the classroom aide. You feed them. But you can't get them to school, or they just can't do it behaviorally. Sometimes poverty is just a more powerful force, and no matter how good we think we are, we just can't reach some kids." Unlike public schools, Urban has the ability to remove such students from the school. "It's a criticism we hear all the time," Sister Maureen said, particularly when comparisons are made with public schools on graduation rates. Urban, she said, removes only about five children a year, and only after going through an intervention process that includes the parents, the teacher, a school counselor or psychologist, and any outside agency assisting the family. "We work with them so we can keep them," she said, while acknowledging that it doesn't always work. "Children act out oftentimes because of the consequences of poverty." Always more than just a school But poverty doesn't always win, and that's what keeps Gill and Sister Maureen and everyone else at Urban going. "I can remember loading up food in the back of the car and driving to somebody's house and dropping it off, just because we knew they had six kids, and we knew for sure that [their] mom knew us, trusted us to preserve their dignity, and accepted things from the school," Sister Maureen said, describing both the needs of the population and one of the solutions Urban offered. Bob Duda remembers food deliveries, too, though as a child he was not entirely aware how much his family needed that help. "You see your mom eat a sardine sandwich while you're eating dinner, and she says it's because she likes it, and you don't realize until you get older that it was because there wasn't enough food for everyone," he said. Duda went from Urban to Cleveland Central Catholic High School. He started college at Cuyahoga Community College, went on to the Pittsburgh College of Mortuary Science, and finished his degree at John Carroll University. He now works as a funeral director and embalmer at Bogner Family Funeral Home in North Ridgeville. "None of that would have happened without Urban," he said. "When I was at Central Catholic, my parents wouldn't pay my tuition. So who do I call when I'm about to get kicked out? Sister Maureen. She made a few phone calls and worked with St. Augustine Church, and thankfully got it paid." Tuition payments were at times a problem at Urban, too. "I remember at eighth-grade graduation, I was bawling my eyes out because I knew my parents had not paid, and I knew I would get to walk with my class but I wouldn't get my real diploma." When Sister Maureen handed the diploma cover to him, he opened it and the diploma was there. "She whispered to me, 'Do you really think we weren't going to let you graduate?' " Urban, said Sister Maureen, has always been more than a school, and this is one of the key reasons its students succeed. The school calls the approach the Whole Child Network, which encompasses academic, social, emotional, physical and spiritual development. "We're looking at the full scope of that whole child and that whole family," Gill said. "Because they're developing human beings, and you've got to think about all aspects of the child's life if you're going to have an impact." Individual attention - and an open heart  Partnership programs give Urban expanded opportunities to serve their students and community. The school offers after-school programs, in a partnership with Open Doors Academy, and summer camps, in partnership with St. Ignatius High School. It is embarking on a partnership with Urban Squash Cleveland, a part of the National Urban Squash Educational Association. That group started in Boston about 25 years ago, when they saw research that showed squash programs at elite colleges offered scholarships, but half of those scholarships were never awarded because so few students played. A new squash facility will break ground on the Urban campus this summer. "We donate the property," Gill said. "Urban Squash Cleveland's board raises the money to build the building. We'll have half the slots for our students." Urban is hoping to build an early-learning center for children from birth to age 3 using a similar partnership strategy. "Our board would build that on our property," Gill said. "But another center would operate it, because that age group is not what we do; they do it well; and we want it on our campus." Agnes Akita, who has two children at Urban, was surprised by how far the school goes to support not just students, but the whole family. Akita arrived in Cleveland from Uganda 11 years ago; both she and her ex-husband came here for graduate school at Case Western Reserve University. By the time Akita met Sister Maureen through a priest at her church, she and her children had fled her home near CWRU and were living in a West Side domestic violence shelter. "I was just this woman from Uganda in a shelter with two kids, and she right away wanted to help," Akita said. "I was like 'Wow, this woman doesn't even know me, and she offered to pay my rent.' " Akita ended up making other arrangements. But, she said, "just that she offered, that was really, really touching. That's an example of the extent she'll go to, to get people back on their feet." As Bob Duda discovered, Akita found that she was not the only one on Sister Maureen's radar. "It's whoever she can help." Akita's children, Selina, now 12 years old, and Fernando, 10, thrived at Urban, both academically and socially. "What I really like about Urban is the diversity, not just ethnicity but cultural and financial," she said. "There are people there who have been fortunate and people who are working hard and struggling, and immigrants. Every place has a culture, and they have this warm, humble atmosphere." Akita, who is 36, earned two master's degrees from CWRU, one in nonprofit management in 2009 and the second in social work in 2014. She's now studying in the registered nurse program at Tri-C. The academic piece of her children's school is key for her. She likes the individual attention, which starts when all teachers visit their students' homes at the beginning of the school year. "I love that," she said. "So the children know the teacher, and the teacher knows them." This helped when Akita went through a divorce, and her son was having a hard time. "The teachers really work with you," she said. Akita said she's heartbroken that Sister Maureen is retiring. "My children and a lot of other children consider Sister Maureen family," she said. "And she's a role model for me. When I look at her picture as a young nun with the children, I see this reflection of who I want to grow up and become." Duda said Sister Maureen and his teachers taught him how to imagine a different life when he grew up. "Urban is such a special school because it is a place of love and acceptance," he said. "They pushed me to dream bigger than staying in that circle of poverty. They taught me to dream."
807 points by The Plain Dealer | School types High school College Poverty School Secondary education Secondary school Catholic school
Protesters briefly block Education Secretary Betsy DeVos’s visit to a D.C. school
Education Secretary Betsy DeVos encountered protesters Friday morning outside a D.C. middle school and found her way barred as she tried to enter through a side door, forcing her to retreat into a government vehicle as a man shouted "Shame!"
418 points by The Denver Post | High school Private school Public school Charter school School types Independent school Education Teacher
Parents should talk with their children early about post-graduation plans
There is a mountain of information available to students as they make plans for after high school.
5 points by Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | High school College Secondary school Higher education University Education School types Student
Butler schools maintenance director resigns amid lead contamination controversy
The director of maintenance for the Butler Area School District is the latest person to resign amid a controversy surrounding lead and E coli contamination in an elementary school well.
-2 points by Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | Termination of employment Primary school School types High school Primary education Escherichia coli Butler County Pennsylvania Elementary school
If you care about our public schools and our democracy, beware of Betsy DeVos and her vouchers
The confirmation hearings for Betsy DeVos provided an inordinate amount of drama: guns and grizzlies, an all-night talkathon on the Senate floor, and Vice President Mike Pence’s tie-breaking vote — and with good reason. DeVos, now confirmed as secretary of Education, is not just another inexperienced...
15852 points by Los Angeles Times | School voucher Private school Independent school Teacher Democracy Education School types Religious education
Missouri man charged with beating kids on playground near school
A Missouri man has been charged with beating four children and a school administrator Tuesday morning on a playground near a Near North Side school.
16 points by Chicago Sun-Times | Felony Assault Bodily harm Battery Primary school Chicago School types State
Henderson City Council agrees to receive federal funds for Special Milk Program
Henderson City Council agreed Tuesday to receive up to $35,000 in federal funds for the Special Milk Program, which serves students from 25 elementary schools and seven middle schools citywide.
2 points by Las Vegas Review-Journal | High school Middle school Elementary school School types Primary school Clark County Nevada College Elementary and primary schools
Maryland Democrats blast Hogan's education agenda, likening it to Trump's
Maryland Democratic lawmakers on Tuesday made their case against a series of state education bills that they say push a "privatization agenda" also championed by President Donald Trump and his controversial new education secretary, Betsy DeVos. Dozens of Democrats joined the state teachers union...
-2 points by Baltimore Sun | Public school High school School types Independent school Private school Charter school Teacher United States
Betsy DeVos: 5 faith facts to know about the Education secretary
DeVos was confirmed as Education secretary on Tuesday.       
384 points by USA Today | Calvinism Calvin College School Dick DeVos Christian school School types United States Cabinet Protestant Reformation
5 faith facts about Betsy DeVos
DeVos was confirmed as Education secretary on Tuesday.       
384 points by USA Today | Calvinism Calvin College School Dick DeVos Christian school School types United States Cabinet Protestant Reformation
Grosse Pointe schools 4th grader suspended for threatening teacher
The post was made outside of school hours on Snapchat by a fourth grader at Poupard Elementary in Harper Woods.        
-2 points by Detroit Free Press | Teacher Education High school School types Private school Grosse Pointe Primary school Gymnasium
Harper Woods elementary student suspended for online threat to teacher
The post was made outside of school hours on Snapchat by a fourth grader at Poupard Elementary in Harper Woods.        
-2 points by Detroit Free Press | Teacher Education High school School types Private school Grosse Pointe Primary school Gymnasium
Elementary student suspended for online threat
The fourth-grade student in Harper Woods threatened a teacher on Snapchat, officials said        
-2 points by The Detroit News | Teacher Education High school School types Private school Grosse Pointe Primary school Gymnasium
Elementary student suspended for threatening teacher online
HARPER WOODS, Mich. (AP) - Officials say an elementary school student in suburban Detroit has been suspended after threatening in a social media post to shoot a teacher. WXYZ-TV reports (http://bit.ly/2jYgjA7 ) the Jan. 31 post was made outside of school hours on Snapchat by a fourth grader at Poupard ...
-2 points by The Washington Times | Teacher High school School types Primary school Education Private school English-language films Grosse Pointe