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Jeep erupts in flames after charging cellphone apparently explodes

4 points by Atlanta Journal Constitution | Mobile phone 2000s music groups Battery United States Jeep Telephone Totaled Galvanic cell
Hundreds of Verizon customers are battling data over-limit fees: Money Matters
In the last week, I've heard from about 400 Verizon customers, mostly in Ohio but some from other states too. Most have iPhones. Some have Droids. All have seen their data use through Verizon jump significantly -- doubling or tripling since the spring in many cases, even though their cell phone habits haven't changed. Data costs money. It's been an interesting week. Last weekend, I wrote about a sudden surge in my family's cell phone data through Verizon. In my unscientific survey that lasted one week, every friend and acquaintance I asked said they were having the same problem: Their monthly data use had been soaring in recent months for no apparent reason. In some cases, using more data meant hefty over-limit fees. Well, well, well. Since my column ran a week ago, I've heard from about 400 Verizon customers, mostly in Ohio but some from other states too. Most have iPhones. Some have Droids. All have seen their data use through Verizon jump significantly -- doubling or tripling since the spring in many cases, even though their cell phone habits haven't changed. Data costs money. If you're getting hit by data over-limit charges, you might take comfort knowing you're not alone, no matter what Verizon tells you. And you may be encouraged by a couple of things: I've gotten a few answers this week. And I'm not done yet.   To check your phone's Wi-Fi settings: On an iPhone, go to Settings, then Cellular. Go all the way to the bottom. Make sure the Wi-Fi Assist toggle is off (not green). On a Droid, the button is called Avoid Bad Wi-Fi or Smart Network Switch or something similar, depending on the phone. Go to Settings, then Wi-Fi, then Menu, then Advanced. You should see some sort of Wi-Fi connection option that you can turn off. Like me, many Verizon customers' data use is soaring even when they're on their home Wi-Fi the majority of the time. Even when their phone settings are changed to prevent the phone from switching to data if the Wi-Fi is weak. Verizon is logging data on people's accounts when they are sleeping and not using their phones.  Or being used when their phones are off. Or when the phone's owner has died. A typical person who uses his phone a lot while not on Wi-Fi for things like email, GPS, or checking Facebook might use 2 GB a month. If you watch a lot of videos, or stream, or download things while not on Wi-Fi, you'll use a lot more. One unhappy Verizon customer is Barb McCullough of Parma Heights. She has an old flip phone that can't use data. Data is blocked on the line. But Verizon says her phone is using data. Granted, the amounts are minuscule -- 1.02 MB a month (not GB, but MB). But this ridiculous "data usage," which seems impossible, makes her skeptical of her entire bill from Verizon. McCullough noticed this data use on her flip phone after digging into her bill. The bigger problem is that she and her husband four months ago decided to cut their phone bill by $40 a month by downsizing from unlimited data to a 6 GB plan. Her husband had been using only about 4 GB, so 6 GB seemed like more than enough. But since changing plans in April, he keeps getting alerts every month that he's near his limit, even though he's almost always on their home Wi-Fi. And Verizon hasn't been able answer why McCullough's "dumb" phone with no data or internet capability is using data, she said. Then there's Ron Staso of Cleveland. His family's use has jumped from 30 GB a month to almost 60 GB, according to Verizon. Staso can't figure out why. He just knows Verizon says he racked up over-limit fees of $1,600. After two decades with Verizon, Staso changed to T-Mobile. "I have not had any problems since I switched to T-Mobile," he said. But he refuses to pay the $1,600. Julie Wilson's over-limit charges are less dramatic but she's just as ticked off. Her family's usage has more than doubled in the last four months, from 2.5 GB to about 6 GB, again with no change in cellular habits. When the New York resident complained to Verizon about her $15 over-limit fee, they suggested she change plans. But that would cost her $40 more a month, above the $104 she's paying right now.  She refuses to change from her grandfathered, lower-priced plan.   To file a complaint about Verizon with the FCC Online: https://consumercomplaints.fcc.gov/hc/en-us By phone: 1-888-225-5322. (888-CALL-FCC) When Theresa Cancila of Baltimore called Verizon recently to complain about her family's head-scratching increase in data, she got talked into increasing her plan to save money. Verizon assured her she could get 8 GB a month for the same cost as her current 6 GB. But instead of her bill remaining the same, she got charged a $15 over-limit fee for going over 6 GB, plus $10 more for the new plan that was supposed to be the same cost. She's furious and thinks Verizon is squeezing customers.  "They keep changing the data plans so you keep getting sucked into higher plans," she said. "It's funny because I have been asking people, 'Have you noticed you are blowing through a lot of data lately?' And every time I am getting, 'Yes!' " Perhaps few cases are more stunning than Joyce Shinn's. Her son Stephen is almost always on Wi-Fi, but a few months ago, he started exceeding his 18 GB per month plan. That's more than a lot of families use combined. But her son ran over, racking up $75 in over-limit fees last month. He swears he hasn't changed his cell phone habits. "I talked to Verizon and they gave me some bull about his turning off some setting or another," said Shinn, of Highland Heights. "My son, like most young adults, is pretty phone savvy so I was sure he knew what to do." The troubling part of Shinn's data usage woes is this: Her husband died 18 months ago. "I kept his phone active until recently so I could deal with any business or other calls that might come in that needed to be addressed. " His phone suddenly started using small amounts of data. Shinn insists her late husband's phone isn't used for anything other than looking at phone numbers of missed calls or dealing with incoming calls. How, she asks, is her late husband's phone using data? Overall, she's upset about the over-limit fees -- $75 on her son's account and $30 on hers. But more than that, she's upset that she's being deceived. "We are definitely being ripped off," Shinn said. Karen Savena of Broadview Heights feels the same. Her oldest son has a 6 GB per month plan, and usage has been inexplicably soaring since spring. When he reaches his data limit each month, he immediately shuts off his data. Yet every month for the last four month, his data exceeded his limit. The totals: 6.00900; GB 6.00200; GB 6.01100 GB; and 6.00400 GB. How did he exceed 6 GB? Verizon notified him when he reached his limit. It's the notification that Verizon sent that pushed him over. Yes, the alert is what caused the $10 over-limit fee. If that doesn't make you irate, chew on a few things I learned this month when I talked with Stephen Van Dinter, a manager for Verizon's Great Lakes region. Verizon insists that many customers' problems hinge on the infamous "Wi-Fi Assist" button, Van Dinter said. With iPhones, this is automatically "on" under iOS9, which was introduced a year ago. This allows the phone to switch to costly data if the phone decides the internet connection is poor. What's the definition of "poor"? Dunno. Right now, that's a secret. But it racks up data. With Droids, the default on this Wi-Fi function is off. However, even customers with Droids are seeing surges in data.  Verizon says that when my phone records, and those of hundreds of other people, show data usage in the middle of the night, that's not really accurate. If the records show you used data at 1:47 a.m., for example, when you were fast asleep, that may not be accurate. Verizon reports data in six-hour windows, Van Dinter said. So data usage at 1:47 a.m. may not really have been at 1:47 a.m., he said. "It could be at any hour in that six-hour time frame."  I believe Verizon realizes it has a problem with over-limit charges. That must be the reason the company just this week rolled out its "safety mode" feature for all new plans at no extra charge. It works like this: When you reach your data limit, whatever level you're paying for, Verizon will allow you to continue using data -- but at a much slower speed of 128 kbps for the rest of the billing cycle. So you'll go over your limit, but you won't pay extra, Van Dinter said. Until this past week, "safety mode" cost $5 a month unless you had a new plan of 16 GB or more. So if you were a normal family with 2 or 4 or 8 GB, which is enough for most households, you had to pay extra for "safety mode." Until now. So back to my account. My family's use has basically doubled from 8 GB to 16 GB a month. The Verizon manager, Van Dinter, said that a supervisor in customer service could dig into the specifics of my account and answer a lot of the questions about my usage. That should help me answer other people's questions and we can all get to the bottom of this mystery that is dipping into our wallets. I'm still waiting for that follow-up call. I have a long list of questions for Verizon, and a few for Apple. Here they are: Why are people's phones using data at times when they're on their home Wi-Fi and the Wi-Fi Assist button is off? If there's any truth to that six-hour window thing, consider this: I walked my dog at 8 a.m. Tuesday. I walked him again at 8:30 a.m. Wednesday. In between that time, I didn't leave my house except to take out the trash and to check the mailbox. (It was too darn hot!) I didn't leave my property for about 24 hours. I was on my home's very strong Wi-Fi. My Wi-Fi Assist button is off. Why did my phone ping cellular data 11 times during this period? Why are people's phones using data in the middle of the night when the phones aren't being used and are turned off or on do-not-disturb?  Why do people still go over their data even if they totally turn off their data as soon as they're notified that they're at their limit? How can phones with the data function blocked use data? Do new (replacement) phones use data differently? Like if you get a new 6s to replace your old 6s? If Safety Mode is such a great customer service, why was it just offered as a free option this week for all customers with new plans? If Safety Mode is such as great customer service, why isn't it available for all customers?  If Verizon has known for a year that the Wi-Fi Assist button was causing many customers to use data without their knowledge, why not send a push text to all customers or include an alert with people's bills?  If the Wi-Fi Assist or Avoid Bad Wi-Fi features have been a problem for a year, why did customers start encountering data surges only four or five months ago? And the data use has continued to increase every month for many customers without explanation. When customers call Verizon to complain about data usage, why is the default response from customer service to recommend that they switch their plans and increase their data usage? Why aren't all customers encouraged to look at their Wi-Fi Assist or Avoid Bad Wi-Fi buttons, or their Background App Refresh button, or their Location Services, or other things that could drive up data use? Instead, the customary response given to customers is often: Buy more data. If the times of the data pings aren't necessarily accurate and are really only within a six-hour window, how is it that the phone call time stamps are accurate to the minute?   For people who have their Wi-Fi Assist/ Avoid Bad Wi-Fi buttons turned on, what's the definition of "poor" Wi-Fi? Who makes that determination? Apple or another phone manufacturer? Verizon?  I'd rather be the one to make that decision rather than allow my phone to decide what Wi-Fi strength is acceptable. Some people say that Verizon has told them that their phones sleep when they're not used for long periods. Supposedly, during this time, the phones revert to the LTE data network instead of Wi-Fi. Is this true?   Some people say that Verizon has told them their phones are pinged in the middle of the night to make sure they're working. Is this true? Will customers who were harangued into increasing their data usage be able to switch back to their old plan at the same price? I expect to get answers from Verizon, Apple, regulators and others. Stay tuned.
211720 points by The Plain Dealer | Data Cuyahoga County Ohio Laptop AT&T Telephone Mobile phone Bill Nintendo DS
Abducted woman calls family from trunk of her own car before she dies
From the trunk of her Pontiac, Rita Maze frantically dialed her cellphone. She had been carjacked around noon Tuesday at a Montana highway rest stop between Great Falls and Helena, and now her abductor was driving her east. She made several 911 calls and managed a roughly 10-minute conversation...
1064 points by Los Angeles Times | Federal Bureau of Investigation Law enforcement agency Spokane Washington Interstate 90 Telephone Washington Coeur d'Alene Idaho Spokane County Washington
FAA warns airline passengers not to use Samsung smartphones
Aviation safety officials took the extraordinary step of warning airline passengers not to turn on or charge a new-model Samsung smartphone during flights following numerous reports of the devices catching fire. The Federal Aviation Administration issued the warning Thursday night, citing "recent...
709 points by Los Angeles Times | Federal Aviation Administration Aircraft Air safety Mobile phone Air traffic control Airline Telephone The Extraordinary
FAA warns airline passengers not to use Samsung smartphone
Aviation safety officials took the extraordinary step of warning airline passengers not to turn on or charge a new-model Samsung smartphone during flights following numerous reports of the devices catching fire. WASHINGTON -- Aviation safety officials took the extraordinary step of warning airline passengers not to turn on or charge a new-model Samsung smartphone during flights following numerous reports of the devices catching fire. The Federal Aviation Administration issued the warning Thursday night, citing "recent incidents and concerns raised by Samsung about its Galaxy Note 7 devices." It is extremely unusual for the FAA to warn passengers about a specific product. Passengers were also urged not to put the phones in checked bags. Samsung recently stopped selling the phones and recalled more than 2 million of them after reports that the phones have spontaneously caught fire. In one case, a family in St. Petersburg, Florida, reported a Galaxy 7 phone left charging in their Jeep caught fire, destroying the vehicle.
17 points by The Plain Dealer | Federal Aviation Administration Geoff Tate Sound Telephone Report Federal Mobile phone September 11 attacks
Pokemon Go Wearable to Go on Sale September 16
Pokemon Go is about take a step beyond the phone: Nintendo will start selling a wearable device called Pokemon Go Plus  next week. The device will become available on September 16 for a retail price of $35. Pokemon Go Plus will work a little bit like an activity tracker, connecting to a phone via Bluetooth, and is looking to make... Read more »
45 points by Variety | Mobile phone Game Walking Pokémon Player Telephone A Little Bit Wearable computer
Men alleged to have hacked CIA director’s email account arrested
U.S. authorities have arrested two North Carolina men accused of hacking into the private email accounts of high-ranking U.S. intelligence officials.
6 points by Las Vegas Review-Journal | Central Intelligence Agency Director of National Intelligence Federal Bureau of Investigation E-mail E-mail address Telephone Personal computer Webmail
Exclusive: The ISIS files revealed

34787 points by CNN | Terrorism Mobile phone Europe Telephone Counter-terrorism United Kingdom Attack Telephone exchange
What to Expect at Mobile World Congress (MWC) 2017
Editor's Note: This story was updated on Feb. 19 with more details.
-2 points by Arizona Daily Star | ARM architecture Mobile phone Nexus One Smartphone 3GPP Long Term Evolution Motorola Telephone Google
Patio discussion of N Korea missile launch raises concerns
President Donald Trump's patio strategy session at Mar-a-Lago on Saturday evening is drawing scrutiny for its open-air nature, including aides' use of cell phone flashlights to illuminate potentially sensitive documents.
38608 points by CNN | Mobile phone President of the United States The Washington Post Washington D.C. President Telephone George W. Bush Prime minister
Survey: Members of Congress care what you have to say more than you think
The survey found that emails that aren’t personalized were the least effective type of outreach.       
23149 points by USA Today | United States Congress E-mail Congress Legislatures Telephone United States House of Representatives E-mail address Legislators
In Senate offices, aides juggle other responsibilities as phone calls keep coming
WASHINGTON — Jonas Murphy was taking a message about a cabinet nominee, and Noel Walker was explaining her boss’s opposition to the president’s travel ban when Sen. Bob Casey’s third phone line rang.
397 points by Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | Telephone Telephone call Telephone exchange Facebook Arlen Specter United States Senate Candidate Telephone number
Trump ripped US-Russia nuke treaty during Putin call
President Trump ripped a treaty that capped American and Russian deployment of nuclear warheads as a bad deal for the US during his phone call last month with Russian leader Vladimir Putin, it was reported Thursday. And when Putin suggested extending the 2010 treaty, known as New START, Trump had to pause to ask his...
1423 points by New York Post | President of the United States Russia United States Senate Cold War United States National Security Council United States Telephone Nuclear weapon
New Jersey man connects with sender of message in a bottle
LONG BEACH ISLAND, N.J. (AP) — A New Jersey man has found the person who wrote a message in a bottle.
-2 points by Arizona Daily Star | New Jersey Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom Tony Blair United Kingdom Kingdom of England England Telephone New York
How to get invited to Sen. Cory Gardner’s regional telephone town halls
Sen. Cory Gardner probably won't hold an in-person meeting with constituents, but there are telephone town halls in the works.
545 points by The Denver Post | Twitter United States Senate City and town halls Telephone Internet Telephone exchange Telephone number Social media
Pescara President to quit after his cars were set on fire
PESCARA, Italy (AP) - Club president Daniele Sebastiani says he will leave Pescara at the end of the year after two of his cars were set on fire. Pescara lost 6-2 at Lazio on Sunday and in the early hours of Tuesday morning Sebastiani's cars, which were parked on his ...
-2 points by The Washington Times | Italy Serie A Juventus F.C. Football in Italy Italy national football team Genoa C.F.C. Telephone President
Man, 21, shot during attempted robbery in Baltimore
A 21-year-old man was shot in the cheek by two suspects trying to rob him in Baltimore Monday night, police said. The victim told police he was walking in the 1100 block of West North Avenue in Reservoir Hill when he was approached and shot by the two suspects. Police did not provide a description....
-2 points by Baltimore Sun | Police Harvey Keitel Crime Victim Telephone Detective fiction Transport Week-day names
Can you hear me? What matters is phone fraudsters hear you
Will saying "Yes" automatically cost you money after one of these "Can You Hear Me?" calls? Not necessarily. But don't answer the phone anyway.         
-2 points by Arizona Republic | Telephone number Telephone call Telephone Fraud Credit card Telephone exchange Better Business Bureau Business
‘All hands on deck’ as Trump opposition jams phone lines for Philly-area congressmen
Calls to Senators have more than doubled a previous record, and the House is being flooded, too.
-2 points by The Philadelphia Inquirer | Telephone Telephone call Telephone number Telephone exchange United States Congress United States Senate Arlen Specter Call option
The unemployment rate ticked up slightly. Cue the Trump Twitter distraction.
Here are six other things to talk about!
111 points by The Washington Post | Oath Prayer Unemployment Economics Homelessness Economy Prime minister Telephone
Trump tweets: Iran, Australia, protesters, and Schwarzenegger
A variety of things on the president's social media mind       
11070 points by USA Today | President Arnold Schwarzenegger Prime minister Prime Minister of Australia President of the United States Telephone Governor of California Gray Davis
Openly gay mayor of Holyoke receives letter saying, ‘You are going down.’
Holyoke Mayor Alex Morse is no stranger to letters criticizing his way of doing things. Add to that tweets, Facebook messages, and phone calls to his office giving feedback — both positive and negative — on his job as an elected official. But a note that arrived at his home address this week was different: […]
90 points by The Boston Globe | Official Massachusetts Office Sound Place name disambiguation pages Telephone Freeware Evolution
Cops: Mom charged after 5-year-old found playing in puddle
SKOWHEGAN, Maine (AP) - A Skowhegan, Maine, woman has been charged with endangering the welfare of a child after police say a passer-by told them the woman's 5-year-old child was playing in a mud puddle wearing only a sweatshirt provided by that person. Police say 29-year-old Shawna Towers was jailed ...
-2 points by The Washington Times | Maine Puddle The Washington Times English-language films Prison Telephone
Macedonian prosecutor investigates secret police over tapping of 4,000 phones
SKOPJE (Reuters) - A special prosecutor in Macedonia has launched criminal proceedings against 10 people, including top officials of the secret police, over their suspected role in a phone-tapping scandal that brought down the prime minister.
-2 points by Reuters | Reuters Telephone Thomson Reuters News agency Republic of Macedonia Nikola Gruevski News European Union
Apple covertly sends call histories of iPhone users to iCloud, stores info 4 months – report
Despite Apple fighting to protect customer data in recent years, the company is reportedly storing the call history of iPhone users, uploading the records to the iCloud for as long as four months – unbeknownst to its loyal customers. Read Full Article at RT.com
592 points by Russia Today | Authentication Law enforcement agency Police IPhone Password Security token Two-factor authentication Telephone
Three Mobile hack leaves data of up to 6mn customers at risk – report
A major security breach at the UK’s Three Mobile has potentially exposed the data of up to six million customers, a source told The Telegraph. Three suspected hackers, who reportedly used an employee login to access its database, have been arrested. Read Full Article at RT.com
58 points by Russia Today | Telephone Mobile phone Sales Telephone exchange Customer Mobile River Microsoft Access Mobile Web
Google hits Pixel resellers with 'digital death sentence'
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Some of Google's unwitting users are learning a harsh lesson: If you violate the company's policies, it can abruptly cut you off from your Gmail account, online photos and other vital digital services.
-2 points by Arizona Daily Star | Gmail Internet Punishment Mobile phone Photography Telephone Violated Google
Why the pollsters were so wrong
The election-night coverage of the 2016 vote began with images of the Clinton campaign team gathering in the Javits Center—under the symbolic glass ceiling. Hillary Clinton supporters were enthusiastic, upbeat and expectant.        
-2 points by The Detroit News | Voting Democracy Election Poll Hillary Rodham Clinton Scientific method Behavior Telephone
Man, 36, charged in Sept. 1 shooting in Northwest Baltimore
Police on Tuesday arrested a man in a Northwest Baltimore shooting earlier this month, officials said.Ronald Wilson, 36, of the 3800 block of Penhurst Avenue, is charged with attempted first-degree murder in the Sept. 1 shooting of a 25-year-old man in the 4900 block of Reisterstown Road.Wilson...
-1 points by Baltimore Sun | Database State Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom Murder Telephone
Samsung says China phone fire caused by external heat
Samsung Electronics Co Ltd has said a Galaxy Note 7 phone a Chinese user claimed caught on fire was damaged by external heating, seeking to assure customers in the world's top smartphone market the devices being sold there are safe.
268 points by | Heater Telephone Mobile phone Handset Fan heater Sound China Cordless telephone
Divers searching for triathlete
Divers are searching Lake Livingston for a person believed to have competed in a triathlon on Sunday, the Polk County Texas Game Warden's office said.
36 points by The Houston Chronicle | Polk County Texas Livingston Texas Polk County Tennessee Telephone Humans Telephone exchange
How to buy an iPhone 7 without getting locked into a carrier
Q. Can you walk me through the various iPhone 7 deals? They’re a little overwhelming.         
156 points by Arizona Republic | SIM lock Mobile phone IPhone GSM Telephone 3G Verizon Wireless Roaming
Consumer agency: Don't use Galaxy Note 7
Consumer Product Safety Commission urges Samsung Note 7 owners to stop using the phones         
434 points by Arizona Republic | Consumer Product Safety Commission The Replacements United States Telephone Consumer Replacements Sound
Consumer agency says don't use Galaxy Note 7
Consumer Product Safety Commission urges Samsung Note 7 owners to stop using the phones         
434 points by Arizona Republic | Consumer Product Safety Commission The Replacements United States Telephone Consumer Replacements Sound
Consumer agency to Note 7 users: Stop using your phones
Consumer Product Safety Commission urges Samsung Note 7 owners to stop using the phones         
434 points by Arizona Republic | Consumer Product Safety Commission The Replacements United States Telephone Consumer Replacements Sound
U.S. agency: Samsung Galaxy Note 7 too dangerous to use
The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission says owners of the Galaxy Note 7 smartphones should turn them off and stop using them because of the risk that their batteries can explode. The agency also says it's working with Samsung on ...
2 points by Las Vegas Sun | Consumer Product Safety Commission Mobile phone New York City Telephone Sound California
Samsung Galaxy Note 7 too dangerous to use, U.S. agency says
The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission says owners of the Galaxy Note 7 smartphones should turn them off and stop using them because of the risk that their batteries can explode.The agency also says it's working with Samsung on an official recall of the phones "as soon as possible" and that...
-1 points by Chicago Tribune | Consumer Product Safety Commission Mobile phone Sound Telephone Ahn Byeong-ki Telephone exchange
Consumer agency says don't use the Galaxy Note 7
Consumer Product Safety Commission urges Samsung Note 7 owners to stop using the phones         
434 points by Arizona Republic | Consumer Product Safety Commission The Replacements United States Telephone Consumer Replacements Sound
How to decide if it's time to upgrade your iPhone
It comes down to cost, battery life, storage and speed.         
84 points by Arizona Republic | Mobile phone IPhone Apple Inc. App Store IPod IPhone OS Telephone Headphones