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Suburban St. Louis man convicted of defrauding investors
ST. LOUIS (AP) - A suburban St. Louis man has been convicted of fraud charges for a scheme that cost investors nearly $300,000. A federal jury on Thursday found 45-year-old Robert S. Beyer of Kirkwood guilty of wire fraud and money laundering. Sentencing is Dec. 7. A message seeking comment ...
1 points by The Washington Times | Fraud Supreme Court of the United States Prosecution United States Department of Justice United States Prosecutor Federal Bureau of Investigation Phone fraud
VW engineer pleads guilty to diesel emissions scandal
James Liang reportedly developed a defeat device for a Volkswagen Jetta diesel car        
-1 points by The Detroit News | Volkswagen Volkswagen Group Federal Bureau of Investigation United States Department of Justice Porsche Audi Federal government of the United States Diesel engine
PolitiFact: Clinton’s email defense checks out
During NBC’s “Commandr-in-Chief Forum” on Sept. 7, Hillary Clinton said: “Classified material has a header which says ‘top-secret, secret, confidential.’ Nothing, and I will repeat this and this is verified in the report by the Department of Justice, none of the emails sent or received by me had suc...
4 points by Concord Monitor | Secrecy Classified information Hillary Rodham Clinton E-mail Federal Bureau of Investigation United States Department of Justice Espionage Information sensitivity
Chicago to receive $2.3M to help with police overtime costs
CHICAGO (AP) - The city of Chicago is receiving more than $2.3 million in federal money to help cover overtime costs for police officers amid a spike in violent crime. U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin announced Thursday the city is among the latest recipients of funding from the Department of Justice's ...
1 points by The Washington Times | Washington D.C. Federal Bureau of Investigation City United States United States Department of Justice Illinois Federal government of the United States Chicago
Hackers with attitude: Two arrested for hack that leaked contact info of nearly 30,000 feds
Two North Carolina men were arrested for allegedly participating in hacks targeting high ranking federal officials. The cyberattack led to the leaking of contact information for over 20,000 FBI employees. Read Full Article at RT.com
61 points by Russia Today | United States Department of Justice .hack IP address Federal Bureau of Investigation Member of Parliament United States Department of Homeland Security J. Edgar Hoover Internet
How the FBI went easy on Hillary Clinton
It’s clear now the FBI conducted a sweetheart investigation into Hillary Clinton’s e-mail shenanigans that appears to have been fixed from the start to go nowhere. Far from exonerating Clinton, the nearly 60 pages of documents expose both the systematic destruction of subpoenaed evidence by Clinton’s aides and the curious lack of interest by investigators...
4190 points by New York Post | Federal Bureau of Investigation J. Edgar Hoover United States Department of Justice J. Edgar Hoover Building Bill Clinton Law enforcement agency Drug Enforcement Administration 9/11 Commission
U.S. Ends Corruption Case Against Former Virginia Governor
The Justice Department said Thursday that it would cease its prosecution of Bob McDonnell and his wife, Maureen.
128 points by The New York Times | Supreme Court of the United States United States Attorney Jury Prosecutor United States Department of Justice Lawyer United States Judge
Cleveland police's proposed use-of-force policy designed to address past issues
A proposed use-of-force policy the Cleveland police monitoring team put forth on Thursday is designed to be a stepping stone on which all other departmental reforms can be built, the head monitor said. Watch video CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A proposed use-of-force policy the Cleveland police monitoring team put forth on Thursday is designed to be a stepping stone on which all other departmental reforms can be built, the head monitor said. Matthew Barge said the proposed policy, mandated in a settlement the city entered into with the U.S. Justice Department, is designed to be more streamlined, after receiving complaints from officers that the old one was wonky and unclear. Barge said the policy would be "a road map to a different organization and a new approach to force." The proposed policy was made public following input from the Justice Department, the city and other stakeholders. The monitoring team is seeking public input on the policy. A final version will go before Chief U.S. District Judge Solomon Oliver Jr. for approval. Barge said the team would accept suggestions for at least a few weeks, and that the monitoring team will hold community forums on the city's east and west sides. (To provide feedback, visit the monitoring team's website.) The city's policy must be changed because the Justice Department said Cleveland officers too often use force. Under a plan approved by the judge, it must be approved and in place, complete with additional training for officers, by the end of the year. Barge said that not everything included in the proposed policy can be tied to specific instances in Cleveland police history. Some are, while others are tied to issues that happened in other parts of the country. Here are a few key portions of the proposed use-of-force policies, and why they were included. Reasonable and proportional force The proposed new policy says, like the current one, that officers can use force when it is "objectionably reasonable" -- a legal standard that means an average officer would have made the same decision. This takes into account the fact that officers often have to make split-second decisions. They must also take into account the totality of the circumstances. The proposed policy says the officer can use force "only as necessary, meaning only when no reasonably effective alternative to the use of force appears to exist." If an officer must use force, it can only be enough to fulfill a lawful duty, such as subduing a violent suspect. Barge said it was designed to have a clear set of guidelines that officers should be thinking through before he or she uses force. The policy clarification was necessary because of a myriad of instances where officers used force against a suspect, even when the suspect was not resisting or violent. The Justice Department cited multiple cases as examples for such a policy change. Most notable was the 22-mile police chase in November 2012 that ended in police firing 137 shots and killing Timothy Russell and Malissa Williams. The shots were fired as a result of the car backfiring, as Russell and Williams did not have a weapon. De-escalation techniques Under the proposed policy, officers must take every step possible to de-escalate situations before resorting to force. This can be as small of a task to moving to escape danger and doing their best to "slow down the situation so that more time, options and resources for the incident to be resolved." They should also question whether the reason a person isn't complying with an officer's orders because of a medical condition, mental illness, a language barrier or drug use. If a person is experiencing a mental health crisis, a specialized officer should be called to the scene. Don'ts The proposed policy also has a page-long section of what officers are prohibited to do when using force. These include: * Using force to subdue subjects who are not suspected of any criminal conduct, other than to ensure the safety of an officer or other person. * Use force in retaliation. * Use force against people who yell at officers and are not committing a crime. * Using force against somebody exercising their First Amendment rights. * Use neck holds. * Fire warning shots. The proposed policy acknowledges that there are "rare and exceptional circumstances" that may lead to use of force in these situations. Medical attention Under the proposed policy, officers must provide medical care to anybody injured after he or she used force. The current policy only requires officers to request a supervisor go to the scene and call for medical assistance if someone appeared to be or said they were injured. This policy change is likely necessary for several instances, including the case of 12-year-old Tamir Rice. Officer Timothy Loehmann shot Tamir in November 2014. After Loehmann shot Rice, Loehmann and his partner Frank Garmback stood around, presumably waiting until an ambulance arrived. An FBI agent who heard about the shooting over a scanner arrived soon after and gave the boy help. Duty to intervene Under the new provisions, officers would be required to intervene and stop use of force abuses carried out by their fellow officers. A sense of loyalty among officers is believed to have caused some internal and criminal investigations into officer conduct to implode.  This includes the case of Edward Henderson, whom police officer kicked on Jan. 1, 2011 as he lay on the ground, subdued following a car chase on the Detroit Shoreway. Four officers were charged in state court but their charges were dropped when federal prosecutors picked up the case. The investigation stalled after federal authorities were unable to identify the officers shown on the video. None of the officers involved in Henderson's arrest filed reports that indicated they used force. Henderson was convicted of felonious assault of a peace officer, after police said he tried to run an officer over at the beginning of the chase. He served three years in prison. The city agreed to pay Henderson $600,000 to settle an excessive force lawsuit.  Barge said it is going to take a long time to have this type of duty baked into the police culture, but that it is an important. If you would like to comment on this story, please visit Thursday's crime and courts comments section.
195 points by The Plain Dealer | Police United States Department of Justice Crime Constable Police brutality Criminal law Federal Bureau of Investigation Officer
Roger Thomas Clark, Silk Road suspect, defies extradition efforts 10 months after arrest
Roger Thomas Clark, a Canadian man accused of helping operate Silk Road, the now defunct internet drug bazaar, vowed to beat efforts to have him extradited to the United States in his first interview since being arrested last year in Thailand. Mr. Clark, 55, has been held in Bangkok jail ...
14 points by The Washington Times | Federal Bureau of Investigation United States Department of Justice Prison United States Crime Special agent Collateral consequences of criminal charges Law enforcement agency
Washington man charged in $2.7-million Alaska fraud case
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) - Federal authorities have arrested a Washington state man suspected of defrauding Alaskans by promising to share a pharmaceutical settlement if they helped pay his medical expenses. Federal prosecutors in Anchorage say 55-year-old Floyd Mann, Jr. of Puyallup (pew-AL-up) bilked Alaskans out of $2.7 million and used ...
1 points by The Washington Times | Washington United States Alaska Fraud U.S. state United States Department of Justice Supreme Court of the United States United States Attorney
A fish story in Platte River Networks’ purge of Clinton e-mails
The latest controversy involving Hillary Clinton’s decision to run her State Department e-mail through private servers contains a hard-to-believe shocker that ought to give reasonable people pause.
9203 points by The Denver Post | Hillary Rodham Clinton Federal Bureau of Investigation Bill Clinton United States Department of Justice J. Edgar Hoover Robert Mueller Barack Obama United States Senate election in New York 2006
Tucson man gets 30-year prison sentence in child porn case
TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) - A 29-year-old Tucson man faces 30 years in federal prison after pleading guilty to four counts of production of child pornography. U.S. District Judge Cindy Jorgenson on Tuesday sentenced Eric James Alvarez in a case stemming from Alvarez's making of videos of himself sexually assaulting a ...
-1 points by The Washington Times | Federal Bureau of Investigation Tucson Arizona Arizona U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement United States Department of Justice European Union United States Washington D.C.
Cleveland releases proposed policies on police use of force
CLEVELAND (AP) - Cleveland is proposing that officers attempt de-escalation techniques such as taking cover before using force, a tactic that might have prevented an officer from fatally shooting 12-year-old Tamir Rice. The proposed use-of-force policy made public Thursday is required under an agreement between Cleveland and the U.S. Justice ...
-1 points by The Washington Times | Federal Bureau of Investigation Federal government of the United States United States Department of Justice Police Washington D.C. United States Marshals Service United States federal executive departments Drug Enforcement Administration
Proposed Cleveland police policy clearly defines when cops can use force
The team monitoring Cleveland's police reform efforts is expected Thursday to unveil a new use-of-force policy for public comment before it is submitted to a judge for approval. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- The team monitoring Cleveland's police reform efforts is expected Thursday to unveil a new use-of-force policy for public comment before it is submitted to a judge for approval. The proposed policy is another step required by a settlement the city entered into with the U.S. Justice Department after the Justice Department said Cleveland officers too often use force. The new policy would make several key changes to the department's current use-of-force policy, the monitoring team says. These include: * Officers can use force when it is "objectionably reasonable" -- a legal standard that means an average officer would have made the same decision -- but they must also use force that is proportional to the threat against the officer. In other words, if a suspect or resident is passively resisting arrest, using force is likely not allowed. * Instead of encouraging officers to using de-escalation techniques to try to calm a situation down, officers will now be required to use these techniques before using force. * Officers must provide medical care to anybody injured after he or she used force. The current policy only requires officers to request a supervisor go to the scene and call for medical assistance if someone appeared to be or said they were injured. The proposed policy also lists 16 "don'ts" for officers, many of which appear to be inspired by incidents the Justice Department described in a December 2014 report. This policy was originally set to be presented to the public for comment in July. However, the department's preparations for the Republican National Convention that month pushed back many deadlines. Monitoring team head Matthew Barge said in a video set to be released Thursday that his plan is still to have all officers trained on a new policy by the turn of the new year. "This means that, if all the timelines hold, Cleveland will be operating under a new use-of-force policy at the start of next year," Barge said in the video. If you would like to comment on this story, please visit Thursday's crime and courts comments section.
77 points by The Plain Dealer | United States Department of Justice Federal government of the United States Arrest United States federal executive departments Resisting arrest
Montgomery faith council presents DOJ talk on religious bias
SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) - Montgomery County faith leaders are bringing a U.S. Justice Department official to Silver Spring to talk about religious discrimination in land-use decisions. The Rev. Ken Howard, an Episcopal rector from Germantown, says 80 faith communities and 10 government agencies are sending representatives to the forum ...
-1 points by The Washington Times | Law Washington D.C. Federal government of the United States United States Department of Justice Federal Bureau of Investigation Montgomery County Maryland Maryland United States Marshals Service
Federal judge dismisses fraud case, blasts prosecutors' actions
A federal judge has dismissed fraud charges against the owner of a local pharmacy chain, accusing prosecutors of failing to disclose evidence, presenting "significant" false testimony at trial and destroying evidence.U.S. District Judge George L. Russell III called the actions of federal prosecutors...
76 points by Baltimore Sun | Lawyer Jury United States Department of Justice United States Attorney Supreme Court of the United States Prosecutor Attorney at law Judge
FBI tactic in child porn sting under attack
Judges are saying FBI violated federal rules of criminal procedure when it acted as child porn purveyor.         
862 points by Arizona Republic | Judge Magistrate United States magistrate judge Warrant United States federal judge Supreme Court of the United States Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution United States Department of Justice
Feds working with local authorities on evidence-destruction cases
Federal investigators are working with local authorities to untangle the destruction of what prosecutors say could be as many as 21,500 pieces of evidence by the Precinct 4 constable's office that led to erroneous jailing or convictions of more than 150 defendants.
18 points by The Houston Chronicle | Federal Bureau of Investigation Audit United States Department of Justice Office Police Financial audit Auditing Local government
Brothers convicted in cocaine distribution case
A pair of brothers from Eagle Pass will spend almost 20 years in federal prison for using their body shop as a front for their narcotics trafficking operation, officials said.
5 points by The Houston Chronicle | Rio Grande Drug addiction United States Department of Justice Illegal drug trade United States Morphine Money Sibling
If you want checks and balances, vote Trump: Glenn Reynolds
The civil service, though supposedly professional and nonpartisan, has become a Democratic Party monoculture.         
3695 points by Arizona Republic | Bill Clinton Federal Bureau of Investigation Hillary Rodham Clinton Paul Cellucci President of the United States United States Department of Justice Democratic Party United States
FBI launches billboard campaign to find Baltimore Co. man charged in mail fraud case
The FBI launched a billboard campaign Wednesday to track down a Lutherville man who is wanted in an alleged $50 million mail fraud scheme.Brian Keith Wallen, 52, is one of two men named in a federal indictment unsealed Wednesday. The June indictment alleges that Wallen was the CEO of companies...
-1 points by Baltimore Sun | Baltimore County Maryland Federal Bureau of Investigation Plea Fraud Law enforcement agency Baltimore United States Secret Service United States Department of Justice
Man charged in Minneapolis mosque threat
Federal prosecutors have charged a 57-year-old man with threatening a Minneapolis …
-1 points by Las Vegas Sun | Federal Bureau of Investigation Lawyer United States United States Department of Justice U.S. state Egypt September 11 attacks Law enforcement agency
Federal judge calls out prosecutors in prison recording case
KANSAS CITY, Kan. (AP) — During a federal court hearing that mainly focused on recordings of attorney-client conversations by a Kansas prison, U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson accused a federal prosecutor Wednesday of improperly trying to access her office last…
-1 points by Arizona Daily Star | Lawyer Prosecutor Jury Supreme Court of the United States Judge United States Department of Justice Federal government of the United States Prosecution
DOJ drops appeal in Pulse records case
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — The U.S. Department of Justice is reversing itself less than a week after it appealed a ruling on whether authorities must release hundreds of 911 calls recorded during a massacre at a gay nightclub in Florida.
-1 points by Arizona Daily Star | Federal Bureau of Investigation United States Department of Justice Weather United States United States Marshals Service Court Florida Tropical cyclone
Deputy constable in Texas destroys 21,500 pieces of evidence
A deputy constable in Texas destroyed more than 20,000 pieces of evidence.
205 points by Daily News | Houston Federal Bureau of Investigation Greater Houston Law Lawyer United States Department of Justice Harris County Texas
Detroit-area trucking company owner sentenced to nine years for dealing club drugs
A Detroit-area trucking company owner was sentenced Wednesday to nine years in prison for leading an operation that included two Rocky River sisters and brought large amounts of club drugs to the Cleveland area. Rinald TurhaniFBI  CLEVELAND, Ohio -- The owner of a Detroit-area trucking company was sentenced Wednesday to nine years in prison for leading an operation along with two Rocky River sisters that brought large amounts of club drugs to the Cleveland area. Rinald Turhani, 37, used his trucks to bring MDMA and marijuana from Canada to Ohio. He pleaded guilty in June to a conspiracy charge. U.S. District Judge Dan Polster said Turhani would have to be punished for "selling a great deal of poison into the community." Under a deal Turhani reached with prosecutors, Turhani could have faced more than 11 years in prison, but Polster said he felt nine years was sufficient. Turhani was arrested in March along his mistress Denisa Alicka, her sister Jonida Alicka and truck driver Leka Konini. All have pleaded guilty. Ian Friedman, Turhani's attorney, worked hard Wednesday to present Turhani as a family man who, despite letting his family down, was still a good father and husband. Turhani's loved ones sat in the viewing area. Ilva Turhani, Rinald's wife, said her husband has apologized to her every day. And Rinald Turhani said his actions were because he got addicted to drugs. "I promise you this is the first time and the last time I do wrong in my life," Turhani told Polster. Assistant U.S. Attorney Robert Corts questioned how good of a family man Turhani was "when he was out dealing drugs with his paramour." He noted that Turhani was arrested in California in December with nearly 20 pounds of MDMA, yet was let go after the Cleveland FBI wanted to continue its investigation. Even though many would take that as a warning, Turhani continued to deal with drugs, Corts said. Prosecutors said some of the drugs were dealt out of the Rocky River apartment complex where Denisa Alicka lived. She and Jonida Alicka, a former Linndale police officer, routinely traveled from New York and Michigan with drugs, according to court records. Prosecutors have described the two as having a lavish lifestyle, complete with plastic surgery, luxury cars and trips to Miami. The FBI also said Turhani could be a violent man. An agent testified in March that Turhani punched the dealer who owed him drugs in the face so hard that a tooth went through his lip. More: Judge cites 'unexplained wealth' in detaining Rocky River sisters accused of dealing club drugs If you would like to comment on this story, please visit Wednesday's crime and courts comment section.
-1 points by The Plain Dealer | Federal Bureau of Investigation English-language films United States Department of Justice Court Cuyahoga County Ohio Judge Family Greater Cleveland
Hundreds of Chromebooks meant for Providence schools stolen
CUMBERLAND, R.I. (AP) - Hundreds of laptops meant for Providence students have been stolen from a Cumberland FedEx distribution center. WJAR-TV reports (http://bit.ly/2caNHOi ) the Dell Chromebooks were stolen in June and the FBI is now investigating. The Providence School Department says the missing shipment isn't the department's responsibility because ...
-1 points by The Washington Times | Federal Bureau of Investigation Rhode Island Law enforcement agency J. Edgar Hoover English-language films United States Department of Justice Organized crime The Washington Times
Two charged after Cleveland federal agents seize more than 200 pounds of cocaine
Two men face federal drug charges following their arrest Saturday in bust that saw state and federal officials seize more than 200 pounds of cocaine on Cleveland's East Side. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Two men face federal drug charges following their arrest Saturday in bust that saw state and federal officials seize more than 200 pounds of cocaine on Cleveland's East Side. Antonio Navarro-Gaytan, 64, and Alejandro Cota-Luna, 28, each face a drug-conspiracy charge. Agents from a Drug Enforcement Administration task force found the cocaine in a secret compartment below a semi trailer in a parking lot in the 17800 block of St. Clair Avenue.  Their arrest came after California DEA agents tipped off local agents about a large shipment of drugs headed to Cleveland, according to an affidavit released by the U.S. Attorney's Office. Both men declined to make statements to investigators after their arrests, the affidavit says. They made their initial appearances Wednesday afternoon in front of Magistrate Judge William Baughman. Preliminary and detention hearings are scheduled for next week. Both men spoke through a translator and were appointed attorneys. The U.S. Attorney's Office says both men are Mexican nationals. The affidavit says Navarro-Gaytan was stopped at the U.S.-Mexico border in April 2010 while hauling a trailer with cement patio furniture and nearly 40 pounds of marijuana. He was not criminally prosecuted by U.S. officials at the time. The bust is the largest cocaine seizure in Cleveland in more than a decade. Terry Gilbert, Navarro-Gaytan's court-appointed attorney, said he did not know enough about the case to comment. Carolyn Kucharski, Cota-Luna's federal public defender, declined to comment. According to the affidavit: After California agents passed on information, law enforcement here surveyed the address and the semi that was westbound on the Ohio Turnpike. Agents saw Navarro-Gaytan and Cota-Luna meet up with the semi when it arrived at the St. Clair Avenue address. Both men worked beneath the truck with what appeared to be a hidden compartment. A Highway Patrol trooper stopped the car later on Interstate 90 for speeding. When questioned, both men gave different stories. Troopers searched the car and found tools they believed were used to open and re-seal the secret compartment. They also found a ledger that, while mostly written in Spanish, had the address where the men met up with the semi. Agents let them go and got a warrant to search the semi on St. Clair Avenue. They found 92 bricks of cocaine. Each weighed a little more than two pounds. After this discovery, both men were arrested at a hotel near Cleveland-Hopkins International Airport. If you would like to comment on this story, please visit Wednesday's crime and courts comment section.
86 points by The Plain Dealer | Interstate 90 Arrest Federal Bureau of Investigation Drug Enforcement Administration Criminal law Truck Ohio Turnpike United States Department of Justice
Former physician assistant faces federal charges in opioid kickback scheme
A former physician assistant was paid more than $41,000 by a drug manufacturer in exchange for writing hundreds of prescriptions for a powerful fentanyl spray in New Hampshire, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.Christopher Clough, 43, of Dover was arrested Friday and charged with conspirac...
-1 points by Concord Monitor | Medical prescription Medicine Federal Bureau of Investigation Federal government of the United States Patient Health care Health care provider United States Department of Justice
Local businessman prepares false tax returns, sentenced to federal prison for the second time
A local tax return preparer was sentenced Friday to federal prison for the second time, after preparing false tax returns, according to U.S. Attorney Abe Martinez and D. Richard Goss, special agent in charge of Internal Revenue Service-Criminal Investigation.
-1 points by The Houston Chronicle | Taxation in the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation Internal Revenue Service Plea United States Department of Justice Tax Prison Sentence
Review of Minnesota police department includes traffic stops
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) - A federal assessment of the Minnesota police department involved in the fatal shooting of Philando Castile will include a look at traffic stops. The Department of Justice's Office of Community Oriented Policing Services has outlined the goals and objectives for its assessment of the St. Anthony Police ...
-1 points by The Washington Times | Police Constable Law enforcement Community policing United States Department of Justice Police officer Police brutality London
Baltimore County officials notified calls were intercepted during 2013-14 wiretap
Numerous Baltimore County government officials received notices from federal prosecutors this month saying their communications had been intercepted as part of a wiretap investigation in 2013 and 2014. Members of the County Council and County Executive Kevin Kamenetz's administration are among...
-2 points by Baltimore Sun | Federal Bureau of Investigation United States Department of Justice Supreme Court of the United States United States Telephone tapping Baltimore County Maryland Special agent United States Attorney
19yo US-Israeli citizen arrested for wave of bomb threats against Jewish centers
A 19-year-old US-Israeli citizen has been arrested in southern Israel on suspicion of carrying out a wave of telephone bomb threats targeting Jewish centers and communities around the world. Read Full Article at RT.com
-1 points by Russia Today | Law enforcement agency Federal Bureau of Investigation Israel United States Department of Justice United States Police Judaism IP address
DA Seth Williams, in federal court, pleads not guilty to corruption charges

-1 points by The Philadelphia Inquirer | Lawyer Judge Prosecutor United States Department of Justice Criminal law Prosecution United States Attorney Lawyers by type
Hawaii judge who blocked travel ban target of threats
HONOLULU (AP) — The FBI says authorities are aware that the federal judge in Hawaii who ruled against President Donald Trump's travel ban has received threatening messages.
-2 points by Arizona Daily Star | United States United States Marshals Service United States Department of Justice Federal Bureau of Investigation Federal government of the United States Judge United States Secret Service Organized crime
DirecTV, AT&T Settle Antitrust Suit Over Dodgers Channel Carriage
AT&T’s DirecTV has settled an antitrust lawsuit brought by the Department of Justice, claiming that it illegally shared confidential information with competitors as they negotiated for carriage of the Dodgers Channel. The Department of Justice said on Thursday that under the terms of the settlement, DirecTV and AT&T agreed to not share “competitively sensitive information”... Read more »
-1 points by Variety | Time Warner Cable Time Warner United States Department of Justice NFL Network Comcast Los Angeles Department of Justice Secrecy
COMMENTARY: Illegal FBI leaks a big problem
Good for Trump for pushing back against the FBI.
1 points by Las Vegas Review-Journal | United States Department of Justice Federal Bureau of Investigation United States Organized crime New York City New York Democratic Party President of the United States
Prosecutors allege Dorothy Brown took bribe, but her lawyer calls it loan
Federal prosecutors alleged for the first time on Friday that Cook County Circuit Court Clerk Dorothy Brown took a $15,000 bribe disguised as a business loan from a man seeking a job with her office.An attorney for Brown, who has not been charged with any wrongdoing, said the payment was a legitimate...
239 points by Chicago Tribune | Federal Bureau of Investigation Grand jury Prosecutor Jury United States Department of Justice Lawyer Supreme Court of the United States Cook County Illinois
Officials: Ohio inmate threatened Trump, sent white powder
Ohio prison inmate has been charged with threatening president, federal judges and others.       
5 points by USA Today | Criminal justice Federal government of the United States United States Federal Bureau of Investigation Lawyer Prison Burglary United States Department of Justice
Is Fox in the doghouse with the feds over secret payments made by former Fox News CEO Roger Ailes?
Whether Rupert Murdoch’s 21st Century Fox lands in hot water with federal prosecutors over payments made to resolve sexual harassment claims at Fox News could boil down to a few key issues: Were Murdoch and other high-level corporate officers aware of the payments, and did they conspire to shield...
2 points by Los Angeles Times | News Corporation Roger Ailes Rupert Murdoch Prosecutor Fox News Channel United States Department of Justice Lachlan Murdoch Corporate governance
Convicted 'Dance Moms' star allowed to travel overseas
"Dance Moms" star Abby Lee Miller, a convicted felon, has been allowed to travel to England today on business over the objections of federal prosecutors. 
9 points by Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | United States district court Felony United States Department of Justice Lawyer Misdemeanor Criminal law 2005 albums Supreme Court of the United States
Trump announces new Labor nominee at White House press conference
In his first solo press conference at the White House, US President Donald Trump announced his new nominee to head the Department of Labor, Alexander Acosta. Read Full Article at RT.com
-2 points by Russia Today | George W. Bush President of the United States Bill Clinton Barack Obama Supreme Court of the United States United States Department of Justice John G. Roberts Alberto Gonzales
Court seeks public comment on Baltimore Police consent decree
U.S. District Court Judge James K. Bredar has set a March 7 deadline for written comments from the public regarding the Baltimore Police consent decree with the Department of Justice, according to an order filed Wednesday. Bredar's order also formally sets an April 6 date for a hearing at the U.S....
-2 points by Baltimore Sun | Federal government of the United States United States Department of Justice U.S. state United States Washington D.C. Federal Bureau of Investigation Law Judge
FBI releases file on 1970s Trump housing discrimination case
Minorities accused Trump company of racial bias.
870 points by The Washington Post | Donald Trump Racism Washington D.C. J. Edgar Hoover Fred Trump The Washington Post United States Department of Justice Watergate scandal
Progressive Caucus turns up heat on Emanuel over police reforms
The aldermen want to know specifically how Mayor Rahm Emanuel intends to proceed on issues such as police training, education and supervision.
45 points by Chicago Sun-Times | Police Federal Bureau of Investigation Criminal justice Police brutality Constable Democratic Party Crime United States Department of Justice
Feds probing Fox News in undisclosed criminal investigation
The U.S. Attorney’s office may be investigating Fox News for an unspecified violation of federal law, the Daily News has learned.
23014 points by Daily News | Supreme Court of the United States Pleading Fox News Channel Roger Ailes United States News Corporation United States Department of Justice Grand jury
Massachusetts man guilty of social media threats to torch mosque
A convicted Massachusetts felon has pleaded guilty to threatening to burn down a Boston mosque during an alcohol-fueled social media spree. The threat was made a day after the 2015 terrorist attack in Paris that left 130 people dead and 360 injured. Read Full Article at RT.com
99 points by Russia Today | Supreme Court of the United States Crime United States Attorney United States Department of Justice First Amendment to the United States Constitution Criminal law Judiciary Act of 1789 Facebook
Jamaican man gets 3 years for threatening immigration judge
COLUMBUS, Ga. (AP) — Prosecutors say a Jamaican man has been sentenced to serve more than three years in federal prison for threatening an immigration judge.
-2 points by Arizona Daily Star | United States Department of Justice Weather Judge Rain
PA Cyber Charter School founder Trombetta seeks to hold prosecutors in contempt
Pennsylvania Cyber Charter School founder Nick Trombetta and his legal team, who have been sparring with the government for weeks following his conspiracy conviction, are now asking a judge to hold the U.S. attorney's office in contempt and pay a fine for filing a document publicly instead of under seal. 
37 points by Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | United States Department of Justice Supreme Court of the United States United States Attorney Federal government of the United States Lawyer Dismissal of U.S. attorneys controversy Judge Judiciary Act of 1789
Emanuel used meeting with Sessions to get specific on fed help
Mayor Rahm Emanuel met with Sessions at the Justice Department after a round of “relationship building” meetings with senior staff at the White House.
42 points by Chicago Sun-Times | President of the United States Democratic Party United States United States Department of Justice Federal government of the United States Barack Obama White House Chicago