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The plot sickens: Oil lobbyist MDEQ chief disappoints
Heidi Grether says she loves nature. But she also lives in the real world, she says, and that means "we have to think about economic prosperity and jobs."        
-1 points by Detroit Free Press | Drinking water Water crisis Water treatment Michigan Water resources Environment Water pollution Water supply
Despite desalinating water, floating it in by barge and taking short showers, Catalina islanders are told to cut back even more
This quaint resort town has a reputation for making visitors feel as if they’re an ocean apart from the troubled megalopolis 22 miles to the east. So it figures that the tourists in Hawaiian shirts and flip-flops strolling past Avalon’s restaurants, bars and trinket shops seemed unruffled by the...
888 points by Los Angeles Times | Desalination Water supply Drinking water Water Water crisis Water resources
DEQ rep who told Flint to 'relax' lands new job
Brad Wurfel resigned as DEQ communications director in December and is named as a defendant in several Flint lawsuits        
-1 points by Detroit Free Press | Drinking water Water crisis Water resources Michigan Water supply Water treatment Water supply network Deficit irrigation
City launching negotiations to bring water to Faraday, Apex
Water could flow by March 2018 to Faraday Future and other tenants that might someday move into the Apex Industrial Complex.
27 points by Las Vegas Review-Journal | Water Water supply network Las Vegas metropolitan area Infrastructure Nevada Construction Water resources Clark County Nevada
Cher Drops Out of Lifetime’s Flint Water Crisis TV Movie, Citing ‘Serious Family Issue’
Cher has dropped out of Lifetime’s television movie “Flint” about the water contamination crisis, Variety has confirmed. The iconic actress and musician was scheduled to begin shooting the film next month, but is unable to participate, due to family issues. Cher cited a “serious family issue” as the reason for her departure from the project, though did not... Read more »
4 points by Variety | Producer Water crisis Film producer Film Water supply Executive producer Katie Couric Water resources
Michigan civil rights panel: Flint water crisis rooted in 'systemic racism'
The Flint drinking water crisis has its root causes in historical and systemic racism, the Michigan Civil Rights Commission said Friday in a hard-hitting report that calls the public health catastrophe " a complete failure of government" and recommends a rewrite of the state's emergency manager...
3 points by Chicago Tribune | Drinking water Water treatment Water crisis Water supply Water supply network Water resources Deficit irrigation Water purification
Civil rights panel: Flint water crisis linked to 'systemic racism'
Report calls for revamp of emergency manager law; training to help state officials recognize unconscious biases        
4553 points by Detroit Free Press | Drinking water Water treatment Water crisis Water supply Water supply network Water resources Deficit irrigation Water purification
Will the crisis at Oroville Dam become a catalyst for change?
Jeffrey Mount, a leading expert on California water policy, remembers the last time a crisis at the Oroville Dam seemed likely to prompt reform. It was 1997 and the lake risked overflowing, while levees further downstream failed and several people died. “If this doesn’t galvanize action, I don’t...
7 points by Los Angeles Times | Reservoir Flood Dam Global warming Water resources
The Latest: Governor sticks by plan to end Flint credits
LANSING, Mich. (AP) — The Latest on Flint's water crisis (all times local):
-2 points by Arizona Daily Star | Water supply Legionellosis Water resources Water supply network Belief Water crisis Deficit irrigation Health
The Latest: Flint hospital fires back at Michigan over order
LANSING, Mich. (AP) — The Latest on Flint's water crisis (all times local):
-2 points by Arizona Daily Star | Water supply Legionellosis Water resources Drinking water Water supply network Belief Water crisis Deficit irrigation
Michigan orders Flint hospital to address Legionella risks
LANSING, Mich. — Michigan ordered a Flint hospital Tuesday to immediately comply with federal recommendations that were issued due to its association with a deadly Legionnaires' disease outbreak, saying the hospital's water system is unsanitary and a possible source of illness.The order, which was issued by the state Department of Health and Human Services, said McLaren Flint has insufficiently demonstrated compliance with recommendations made by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the fall.
-2 points by Boston Herald | Epidemiology Water supply Water supply network Water quality Infectious disease Great Lakes Water resources Michigan
The Latest: State orders Flint hospital to fix health risks
LANSING, Mich. (AP) - The Latest on Flint's water crisis (all times local): 3:35 p.m. Michigan is ordering a Flint hospital to immediately fix conditions the state suspects pose on ongoing public health threat of Legionella bacteria. The state Department of Health and Human Services issued the order Monday. It ...
-2 points by The Washington Times | Michigan Water supply Drinking water Water supply network Water resources Lansing Michigan Water crisis Deficit irrigation
Flint mayor, Michigan governor to discuss water bill credits
LANSING, Mich. — The mayor of Flint is planning to meet with Gov. Rick Snyder Tuesday to discuss Michigan's decision to withdraw some financial assistance that was originally offered to help the beleaguered city and its residents cope with a man-made public health crisis caused by lead-contaminated tap water.The state announced three weeks ago that it will stop paying a portion of customers' bills and also halt covering Flint's costs to use water from the Great Lakes Water Authority — a move that will save the state more than $2 million per month.
-2 points by Boston Herald | Great Lakes Michigan Office Water quality Water supply Water resources United States Official
Tests show high lead levels in water at 60 Cleveland schools
CLEVELAND (AP) - Cleveland schools say tests done this summer show high lead levels in the water at 60 of its buildings. The district said Friday that it will begin replacing 582 drinking fountains, faucets and other water fixtures that were over the federal limits. That includes removing and replacing ...
-2 points by The Washington Times | High school Cleveland The Plain Dealer Water crisis George Voinovich Water resources Cleveland Press Water supply
High lead levels in water found at 60 Cleveland schools
The district said Friday that it will begin replacing 582 drinking fountains, faucets and other water fixtures       
-2 points by The Detroit News | High school Cleveland The Plain Dealer Education Teacher Water crisis George Voinovich Water resources
Cleveland schools find dangerous lead levels in water from 60 buildings; will replace 580 outlets
The school district tested more than 5,000 water samples in dozens of schools and found dangerous levels of lead in 580. 119 were from drinking water sources. All are being replaced. CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Water testing in the Cleveland Municipal School District has uncovered dangerously high levels of lead in samples taken from drinking fountains, sinks and other water sources in 60 older school buildings, the district reported today. The school district voluntarily tested more than 5,000 water samples in 69 schools, starting over the summer, and found 582 were above the Environmental Protection Agency's drinking water standards. These included 79 drinking fountains and 40 faucets in common areas. Some of the water samples were shockingly toxic. A bathroom sink at Wilbur Wright Elementary School on the city's West Side, which houses Pre-K to eighth-grade students, tested at 4,480 parts per billion. Water from a drinking fountain at Tremont Montessori School had lead levels of 1,560 parts per billion. The EPA's drinking water "action level" is 15 parts per billion. (You can find the district's full reports for each building here or enter your school name to find results in the box below). The school district will remove and replace all the fixtures and fittings on the 582 outlets that had results above the EPA standard, said Patrick Zohn, the school district's chief operating officer. Children haven't been exposed to the water this school year. All the tested schools were provided water cooler stations in the fall and any buildings with high results will continue to receive outside water until the repairs are made and a final test confirms no further issues. "We're taking a cautious, conservative approach," Zohn said. The district is expected to notify parents today. Exposure to lead in small children, and particularly infants, can lead to IQ deficits and lifelong health, learning and behavior problems. There is no safe level of lead exposure. The heavy metal is toxic at any level and has no use in the body. Most children with lead poisoning are exposed to the toxin at home by ingesting fine particles of deteriorated lead-based paint or lead-contaminated soil. Far fewer are exposed by drinking water. Cleveland's water supply is regularly tested for lead and has consistently been found safe. Dr. Bruce Lanphear, former director of Cincinnati Children's Hospital's Environmental Health Center, cautioned against dismissing the danger to students, though. School water fountains "can be an important minor source of lead intake for dozens, or even hundreds of children," said Lanphear, professor of children's environmental health at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, British Columbia. Lead levels in water as low as 5 parts per billion can be cause for concern, Lanphear said. Marc Edwards, a civil engineer at Virginia Tech and part of the team that helped uncover the Flint lead water crisis, agreed, noting that the EPA's 25-year-old action level for drinking water is outdated and not based on what's healthy. Both Lanphear and Edwards said the school district's actions -- providing bottled water, taking unsafe taps out of service and replacing problem fixtures -- are the best way to protect children. Decision to act No federal or state law requires schools using a public water supply to test water for lead or other contaminants. It was the crisis in Flint, Michigan, last year that prompted Cleveland school district officials to examine their testing records, said Zohn. In Flint, a switch to a more corrosive water source -- the Flint River -- caused a spike in the amount of lead leached from old pipes in the city, leading to lead poisoning in many children. "You didn't need the gift of prescience to know that someone would eventually say here 'Well, what's the school district doing?'" said Zohn. That's what happened in Chicago, where an inquiry from the Chicago Tribune last spring led city schools to begin testing their water. (Results of those tests are here). Cleveland schools had tested water most recently in 2000, when more than 100 school buildings had issues.   Over the summer, the school district hired Getco Environmental Consultants to begin testing every water source for lead in 65 school buildings constructed before 2002. Another four schools built after 2002 were tested to rule out problems in the district's newer structures. A total of 5,124 samples were taken from drinking fountains, outdoor hoses, bathroom and kitchen sinks, slop and lab sinks, and other sources beginning in July. Of these, about 1,200 had levels of lead above the EPA action level of 15 parts per billion. One sample, taken from a bathroom sink in an administrative building, tested at 79,400 parts per billion. Many of the first results were particularly high because outlets hadn't been used in the schools for a month when samples were taken, giving the water more time to sit and accumulate the toxin. A second round of testing using the same EPA-recommended method confirmed high lead levels in 582 of the 1,200 initially high water samples, including 119 drinking water sources. That's about 9 percent of the drinking water sources tested, which include drinking fountains and any sink where a student or faculty member might fill a cup to drink. None of the four newer buildings tested -- Euclid Park, James A. Garfield, George Washington Carver and Mound Elementary schools -- had any problems. The school district also tested water samples gathered after water had been flushed from each of the outlets for 30 seconds to determine if the lead was more likely coming from the fixtures or the plumbing leading to them. They'll use that information when replacing the 582 water outlets that tested over the EPA level, said Robert Kasler, the school district's trades director. The school district will also replace the non-working and out-of-service water sources, which numbered about 40. Work ongoing, no firm cost estimate School officials do not yet know how much it will cost to fix the district's water issues. Cleveland has spent $140,000 for water stations in the 69 schools where testing took place this year, and has budgeted $50,000 for this purpose through the end of the semester. Some schools will still need the service while water outlets are replaced, adding to the cost. Water testing to date has cost about $390,000 and is not complete. The district does not yet have an estimate for the total cost of replacing the water outlets.  A state law passed in June provides up to $15,000 per building to school districts for replacing lead pipes and fixtures as well as reimbursement for some costs of water testing. Cleveland has applied for this funding, Zohn said. After each outlet is replaced, Getco consultants will again test for lead to be sure the problem is resolved. But for the school district water sources that initially tested near the EPA limit but did not trigger follow-up testing, the plan is less clear. Over time, many become hazards as the fixtures continue to age. School officials said they do not know how or whether they will monitor these potentially hazardous water sources in the future but will "probably" follow up. "We're just kind of focused on getting through this right now," said Zohn. "We can certainly do a survey of the data and include that in follow-up discussions." Plain Dealer researcher Jo Ellen Corrigan contributed to this report. Find out if your school's waters sources tested positive for lead: // try{f_cbload("d22e0000adc79a9fbaae4be8b3be","https:");}catch(v_e){;} // ]]> Click here to load this Caspio Cloud Database Cloud Database by Caspio
420 points by The Plain Dealer | Drinking water Water resources High school Lead poisoning Water crisis Water supply Water Fountain
State: Flint water delivery ‘unnecessary’ burden
The judge’s order of home delivery of four cases of water per resident weekly would cost the state $10.5 million a month        
-2 points by The Detroit News | Drinking water Michigan Water supply Water crisis Appeal Water resources Deficit irrigation Water
Flint water delivery ‘unnecessary’ burden
The judge’s order of home delivery of four cases of water per resident weekly would cost the state $10.5 million a month        
-2 points by The Detroit News | Drinking water Michigan Water supply Water crisis Appeal Water resources Deficit irrigation Lansing Michigan
State: Flint water delivery order ‘unnecessary’ burden
The judge’s order of home delivery of four cases of water per resident weekly would cost the state $10.5 million a month        
-2 points by The Detroit News | Drinking water Michigan Water supply Water crisis Appeal Water resources Deficit irrigation Lansing Michigan
Flint water delivery 'unnecessary' burden
The judge ordered home delivery of four cases of water per resident each week unless they have a proper filter        
-2 points by The Detroit News | Drinking water Water supply Water crisis Michigan Water resources Injunction Federal government of the United States Lawsuit
State fights order to deliver bottled water in Flint
The state plans to appeal a federal court order and today filed a request for an immediate stay.        
-2 points by Detroit Free Press | Drinking water Water supply Water crisis Water quality Water resources Tap water
Flint must top the president-elect’s agenda
The interminable failure of government to marshal all available resources, brainpower, imagination, and resolution of spirit, to finally solve Flint, Michigan’s contaminated water problem, stands as a giant scarlet letter branded on the breast of Ame        
-2 points by The Detroit News | Drinking water Water crisis Water supply network Water resources Water treatment Waterborne diseases Desalination Water quality
Editorial: House should move Flint relief bills
The House should give the Flint relief package the same overwhelming support that the Senate did        
-1 points by The Detroit News | United States Congress United States Environmental Protection Agency Water supply network Infrastructure Water resources United States Drinking water United States Senate
Democrats see stopgap spending bill as best chance to get funding for Flint water crisis
Flint aid has emerged as one of the final sticking points as negotiators continue to bicker over the remaining details of the stop-gap spending bill, which would keep the government funded through Dec. 9 and also provide more $1 billion to combat the Zika virus.
106 points by The Washington Post | Water crisis Democratic Party United States Senate Water Water supply Water resources Harry Reid Deficit irrigation
California is backsliding on water conservation. L.A. can't and won't follow suit
Last month, California’s Water Resources Control Board took the easy way out on water conservation.  In 2015, California nearly met Governor Brown’s mandatory water conservation goal of 25% thanks to transparent monthly reporting and identifying profligate water wasters. The water board even fined...
-1 points by Los Angeles Times | Water supply Water resources Water management Water crisis Water quality Deficit irrigation Desalination Water
As Flint water improves, how can crisis end?
A top EPA official warns Flint should expect to use filters for drinking tap water through at least the end of the year        
354 points by Detroit Free Press | Drinking water Water supply network Water crisis Water supply Tap water Water resources Water Water quality
Lead leads to busy days at Vancouver lab
VANCOUVER, Wash. (AP) - A typical month at the Vancouver lab location of BSK Associates used to mean 10 to 15 water samples sent in through various cities and a few other homeowner samples sprinkled in. In August, the lab with seven full-time employees handled more than 5,000 samples, reported ...
1 points by The Washington Times | High school Drinking water Water crisis Safe Drinking Water Act Water supply Clean Water Act Water quality Water resources