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Will: Senator’s no populist, still popular
TERRACE PARK, Ohio — U.S. Sen. Rob Portman probably will win a second term, despite the fact that he deserves to. The swarm of young people who gathered on a Saturday morning in this Cincinnati suburb to feast on doughnuts and his gratitude are among the 5,000 volunteer interns, including students from 35 campuses, who have made 3.5 million voter contacts. Portman’s supporters are a forgiving sort, undeterred by his many accomplishments and qualifications that could be disqualifying in this season of populist antagonism toward people who have actually governed.
-1 points by Boston Herald | Ohio George W. Bush Republican Party President of the United States William Howard Taft Warren G. Harding George H. W. Bush Ohio Republicans
Send Rob Portman back to Washington
Ohio Sen. Rob Portman probably will win a second term, despite the fact that he deserves to        
-1 points by The Detroit News | Ohio Republican Party William Howard Taft Warren G. Harding Ohio Republicans Robert Taft Bob Taft William Henry Harrison
Democratic leader won’t overturn decision to re-elect ‘lazy’ judge
Manhattan Democratic Party chairman Keith Wright says he disagrees with his judicial screening panel’s controversial decision that found state Supreme Court Justice Doris Ling-Cohan not qualified for re-election — but won’t overturn it. In a carefully worded statement, Wright said he would abide by the panel’s recommendation even though “I fundamentally disagree” with its decision....
37 points by New York Post | Supreme Court of the United States United States State supreme court Judge Democratic Party New Jersey William Howard Taft Bill Clinton
Ohio lawmakers push bill to override Supreme Court cocaine ruling
Ohio lawmakers seek to negate a state Supreme Court ruling that says sentences must be based on how much pure cocaine the drug offenders had, not the entire weight of suspected drugs, which could include baking soda or other filler material. Ohio lawmakers want to quickly override a state Supreme Court ruling.cleveland.com file photo  TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) -- Ohio lawmakers are quickly pushing through legislation to override a state Supreme Court decision prosecutors fear could delay and shorten sentences for suspects caught with cocaine. The proposal seeks to negate a December ruling that says sentences must be based on how much pure cocaine the drug offenders had, not the entire weight of suspected drugs, which could include baking soda or other filler material. The court's decision upended a practice long-used by law enforcement in Ohio.Only two states, New York and Georgia, require purity tests for cocaine in some cases, while the rest measure the entire weight, according to the attorney general's office in Ohio. The state says Ohio would need to create an entirely new system to test cocaine, which would delay prosecution and require tremendous investment, if the ruling is allowed to stand. It would cost more than $1 million to update the state crime labs and cover the costs of training and supplies within the first year, the attorney general's office said. This past week, lawmakers in the Ohio House unanimously approved legislation that would allow sentences to again be based on the entire weight of the cocaine and filler material. The state Senate is expected to act quickly on the proposal, which includes an emergency clause that would allow it become law as soon as Gov. John Kasich signs it. State Rep. Bob Cupp, a former Ohio Supreme Court justice who sponsored the legislation, said the court's ruling would mean more sentences of probation for people caught with cocaine. "Left unchanged, this incentivizes drug traffickers to possess and transport larger quantities of cocaine," said Cupp, a Republican. The case stems from a 2012 drug sting near Toledo that netted an 11-year sentence for a man convicted of buying more than 100 grams of cocaine from an undercover informant. Rafael Gonzales, of Fremont, was convicted and sentenced to 11 years in prison because he had bought more than 100 grams of what was said to be cocaine from an undercover informant. But prosecutors never tested it to determine how much pure cocaine was purchased, his attorney, Andrew Mayle, argued, noting the difference could be 11 years in prison versus just one year.
70 points by The Plain Dealer | Supreme Court of the United States United States State supreme court William Howard Taft Lists of United States Supreme Court cases Democratic Party United States Congress George W. Bush
Accused killer of jail officer tells on guard’s illegal activity
An NYC man indicted for the murder of a rookie correction officer allegedly told detectives she was involved in her own illegal activity.
456 points by Daily News | Supreme Court of the United States Jury New Jersey New York City Prison William Howard Taft Brooklyn Legal terms
Sununu appoints judicial selection commission
New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu on Monday appointed a bipartisan group of legal, law enforcement and business leaders to help him select judges.Sununu, a Republican who was elected in November, issued an executive order creating a judicial selection commission. It will be led by attorney Chuck Dougl...
-2 points by Concord Monitor | Supreme Court of the United States United States Constitution William Howard Taft State supreme court United States President of the United States Lawyer Judge
Friend of man who claims wrongful conviction: He wasn’t there that night — I was
A Brooklyn man who claims he was wrongfully convicted for the 1995 murder of a 4-year-old girl not only had no part in the fatal shooting — he wasn’t even present at the scene that night, his childhood friend testified Monday. Terrence Morgan told the court he knew his pal Sundhe Moses couldn’t have fired...
45 points by New York Post | Supreme Court of the United States Brooklyn English-language films Conviction Sandra Day O'Connor William Howard Taft Samuel Alito Antonin Scalia
Springs Preserve’s new Boomtown exhibit explores Las Vegas’ history
Open to the public Saturday, the new themed area transports visitors back in time to the city of Las Vegas’ earliest days as a dusty railroad watering stop.
185 points by Las Vegas Review-Journal | William Howard Taft Theodore Roosevelt Train whistle Las Vegas metropolitan area
Let Trump be Trump, the perils of a ‘generals purge,’ and other notable commentary
Military desk: Will Trump Really Purge the Generals? Candidate Donald Trump repeatedly vowed to get rid of the nation’s top senior military officials within 30 days of taking office. But that, warns The Washington Post’s Josh Rogin, “could provoke a crisis in civil-military relations at the very beginning of his presidency.” For one thing, “an...
8 points by New York Post | William Howard Taft Warren G. Harding Charles Evans Hughes President of the United States Herbert Hoover Douglas MacArthur Supreme Court of the United States Calvin Coolidge